Localvore Today https://www.localvoretoday.com More Local For Less Fri, 18 Apr 2014 07:00:25 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=3.7.1 Localvore Security Update! https://www.localvoretoday.com/2014/04/10/localvore-security-update/ https://www.localvoretoday.com/2014/04/10/localvore-security-update/#comments Thu, 10 Apr 2014 13:15:16 +0000 https://www.localvoretoday.com/?p=410591 The good news is that the Localvore SSL encryption was not affected: This is directly from our SSL security provider: To be clear, this is a vulnerability of the OpenSSL library, and not a flaw with SSL/TLS nor certificates issued by RapidSSL. Additionally, RapidSSL immediately followed best practices by patching our systems and re-keying all certificates on our web servers. At no time were RapidSSL's SSL or Code-Signing roots and intermediates at risk, nor was there ever an issue with RapidSSL certificates. That is the good news:  The not so good news is that other sites you may have visited might have been affected. Please do your due diligence and change your passwords on sites that may be affected! We work very hard at protecting your identity and information and want you to be safe! Check out this link for more information: http://mashable.com/2014/04/09/heartbleed-bug-websites-affected/]]> An encryption flaw called the Heartbleed bug is already being called one of the biggest security threats the Internet has ever seen.

The good news is that the Localvore SSL encryption was not affected: This is directly from our SSL security provider:

To be clear, this is a vulnerability of the OpenSSL library, and not a flaw with SSL/TLS nor certificates issued by RapidSSL. Additionally, RapidSSL immediately followed best practices by patching our systems and re-keying all certificates on our web servers. At no time were RapidSSL’s SSL or Code-Signing roots and intermediates at risk, nor was there ever an issue with RapidSSL certificates.

That is the good news:  The not so good news is that other sites you may have visited might have been affected.

Please do your due diligence and change your passwords on sites that may be affected! We work very hard at protecting your identity and information and want you to be safe!

Check out this link for more information: http://mashable.com/2014/04/09/heartbleed-bug-websites-affected/

An encryption flaw called the Heartbleed bug is already being called one of the biggest security threats the Internet has ever seen. The good news is that the Localvore SSL encryption was not affected: This is directly from our SSL security provider: To be clear, this is a vulnerability of the OpenSSL library, and not a flaw with SSL/TLS nor certificates issued by RapidSSL. Additionally, RapidSSL immediately followed best practices by patching our systems and re-keying all certificates on our web servers. At no time were RapidSSL's SSL or Code-Signing roots and intermediates at risk, nor was there ever an issue with RapidSSL certificates. That is the good news:  The not so good news is that other sites you may have visited might have been affected. Please do your due diligence and change your passwords on sites that may be affected! We work very hard at protecting your identity and information and want you to be safe! Check out this link for more information: http://mashable.com/2014/04/09/heartbleed-bug-websites-affected/]]>
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Localvore Spring Giveaway: Enter to Win $250 Gardener’s Supply Co. Gift Card! https://www.localvoretoday.com/2014/04/07/gardeners-supply-giveaway/ https://www.localvoretoday.com/2014/04/07/gardeners-supply-giveaway/#comments Mon, 07 Apr 2014 16:51:17 +0000 https://www.localvoretoday.com/?p=399780 FacebookElement_Ad

LVT_Gardeners_Header

Winter is finally releasing its icy grip on Vermont and spring is in the air. We're day-dreaming about long summer days, creemies, blooming flowers, and bountiful gardens. In the spirit of spring, we're giving away $250 to Gardener's Supply Co. Garden Centers! Entering this contest is free free FREE! All you need to do is click here! After you enter, you can increase your chances of winning by sharing it with your friends. You'll get bonus points for that!]]>
FacebookElement_Ad

LVT_Gardeners_Header

Winter is finally releasing its icy grip on Vermont and spring is in the air. We're day-dreaming about long summer days, creemies, blooming flowers, and bountiful gardens. In the spirit of spring, we're giving away $250 to Gardener's Supply Co. Garden Centers! Entering this contest is free free FREE! All you need to do is click here! After you enter, you can increase your chances of winning by sharing it with your friends. You'll get bonus points for that!]]>
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Hinesburg Public House Earns the Gluten Free Seal of Approval from GF Vermont! https://www.localvoretoday.com/2014/04/03/hinesburg-public-gf-vermont/ https://www.localvoretoday.com/2014/04/03/hinesburg-public-gf-vermont/#comments Thu, 03 Apr 2014 15:45:30 +0000 https://www.localvoretoday.com/?p=379805 gf-vt-featured

gf-vermont-banner Localvore Today features a $20 voucher to the Hinesburgh Public House for just $10! Get it in the next 7 days. Buy one for a friend too! Great gluten-free options at the Public House include GF chicken wings (buffalo with homemade ranch sauce), poutine with GF gravy, salads, fish, meats and more! They feature local farms as much as possible. The wait and kitchen staff are extremely knowledgeable about Celiac’s disease and take great care in preparing your meal gluten-free. I cannot say enough good things about the GF options here!!! xoxo, GFVT   Cross-posted with permission from GF Vermont! Check out their blog!]]>
gf-vt-featured

gf-vermont-banner Localvore Today features a $20 voucher to the Hinesburgh Public House for just $10! Get it in the next 7 days. Buy one for a friend too! Great gluten-free options at the Public House include GF chicken wings (buffalo with homemade ranch sauce), poutine with GF gravy, salads, fish, meats and more! They feature local farms as much as possible. The wait and kitchen staff are extremely knowledgeable about Celiac’s disease and take great care in preparing your meal gluten-free. I cannot say enough good things about the GF options here!!! xoxo, GFVT   Cross-posted with permission from GF Vermont! Check out their blog!]]>
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What’s All This Buzz About Raw Vermont Honey? https://www.localvoretoday.com/2014/03/21/raw-vermont-honey/ https://www.localvoretoday.com/2014/03/21/raw-vermont-honey/#comments Fri, 21 Mar 2014 19:58:54 +0000 https://www.localvoretoday.com/?p=251590 raw-honey-blog-1

raw-honey-blog-1 By Caroline Phillips This winter the Localvore team is dippin’ into local beehives, making like a honey-bear and collecting that sweet nectar produced by our buzzing buddies. Our seasonal obsession with honey is not only delicious but also well founded in the number of awesome health benefits honey--specifically local honey--provides. And you know us, we’re all about local benefits! As most insects escape winter through hibernation, fortifying their bodies and eggs from the cold, the miraculous honeybee works as a community to survive in their non-native northern climate. Alone, a honeybee would die in the cold but within their hive the activity and warmth achieved through the busy buzz of brethren keeps them alive in subzero weather. These inspiring creatures create an inspiring product and like it’s creator, honey provides amazing benefits to those who cultivate and celebrate the flight of the honeybee. So, what exactly is honey anyway? It’s more than just the sweet, golden syrup we like to drizzle into our tea. Honey is a concentration of simple sugars created by honeybees from the nectar of flowers. To the honeybees themselves, honey is their carbohydrate providing energy and fuel. When talking about honey, we often think of pollen. Pollen is collected from flowers along with nectar and is a pure protein used by bees. Humans use pollen in powder form as a protein enhancer for certain foods and natural supplements. Honey, specifically raw honey, contains traces of pollen but its benefits are quite different. Pollen provides the protein and honey provides the antioxidants. When looking to add honey to your diet, look for raw and look for local. Raw honey has not been pasteurized, heated or processed in any way, therefore retaining all valuable minerals, vitamins, enzymes, and powerful antioxidants. This super food works best raw. Although many of our favorite honey recipes call for baking, we learned that the benefits raw honey provides reduce greatly when heated (heated honey = refined sugar) - that’s not to say these baked treats are any less delicious, and honey is still a wiser choice in the honey vs. refined sugar debate. What can raw honey do? A lot! Raw honey helps:
  • digestion
  • strengthen the immune system
  • eliminate allergies
  • stabilize blood pressure
  • balance blood sugar
  • calm nerves
  • relieve pain
  • treat ulcers, sore throats, colds, and indigestion
From ancient to modern times, raw honey can be found in beauty products and health products alike. Honey is a great anti-aging agent, moisturizer, and antibacterial. Got a zit? Put a dot of raw honey on it! What’s the big deal with buying local raw honey? Well, do you have allergies? Local honey is made by local honeybees collecting pollen specific to your neighborhood. Consuming a spoonful once or twice a day starting a few months before allergy season will slowly introduce local pollen to your system- preparing you to take on the great outdoors when everything is in full bloom. Supporting local beekeepers also supports your local market and nature. The cultivation of honeybees is an important step in protecting the natural flora of your community. [caption id="attachment_338845" align="alignright" width="225"]vermont-beekeepers-cookbook The Vermont Beekeepers Cookbook[/caption] In our honey craze, here at Localvore Today we have been trying out some home remedies inspired by The Vermont Beekeepers Cookbook! This sweet, Vermont favorite was found at the Sweet Clover Market in Essex returning home from an apple picking adventure at Chapin Orchards. Initially into the awesome baking recipes, I was pleasantly surprised to find an array of simple, home remedies in the last couple pages of the book. This holiday season I doled out homemade lip balms made of local honey, beeswax, and lavender. Never having made anything like this before, I am pleased to say I have become a convert to not only the honey craze but also the DIY simplicity of quality ingredients creating quality goods. The success of the lip balms encouraged the making of a hydrating salve, that I swear by! I brought my salve into the Localvore office and everyone was feeling the honey love! As a sensitive, dry skinned Vermonter I would recommend this gentle salve recipe as a year-round cure for winter-chapped to sunburned skin.

Honey Lavender Lip Balm

Ingredients: (I made a larger batch than this recipe calls for. The ingredients below will produce approx. 7 little pots of lip balm)
  • 1 tablespoon of beeswax
  • 3 tablespoons of carrier oil (basically, an oil of your choice- I used olive oil because it was what I had on hand, but next time I plan on playing with different oils)
  • 5-10 drops of lavender oil
  • 1 tsp of honey
  • a sprinkle of lavender for aesthetics (optional- made my lip balms look pretty but they did sometimes leave lavender on the lips)
  1. Get out your double boiler or, in my case create one by setting an oven safe pyrex in a pot with rolling boiling water. Mix all ingredients except the honey and aesthetic lavender into pot. Let ingredients slowly melt into liquid.
  2. Remove from heat and stir honey into mixture. Once combined, you are ready to pour your liquid lip balm into individual tin pots.
  3. Sprinkle lavender on top of balms and let cool overnight before use. Simple, easy lip balm. You'll never buy chap stick again!
raw-honey-blog-2

Calendula, Chamomile, Lavender, Peppermint Salve

(Note: The Beekeeper’s Cookbook calls this the Comfrey Salve, however, due to my sensitive skin I chose a Calendula base and the other herbs contain properties similar to what Comfrey offers. I also used Chocolate Peppermint because it was what I had on hand drying in my kitchen but a Wild Mint would do very well too) Ingredients:
  • 4 cups of herbs ( I used equal parts Calendula, Chamomile. Lavender, and Peppermint but you could use more or less of whichever herbal properties you desire most)
  • About 3/4 cup of olive oil (amount will be equal to “tea” solution created)
  • 1 oz. bar of beeswax (usually beeswax  comes in 1 oz bars, I bought mine at City Market and used about 3/4 of the bar)
  • Glass jar with lid
  1. Measure out herbs and place in stainless steel pot or colander with enough water to coat. The leaves should be coated but the water level is not high. The goal here is to make a very strong tea. Bring that water up to boiling then put it low at a simmer for at least 30 min. Don’t burn the leaves!
  2. Strain the tea into a separate pot or bowl. I actually used an upside down cheese grater for this step because I don’t own a sieve or strainer fine enough to catch the small leaves. I then used a small, individual tea strainer to “go fishing” for the loose bits I couldn’t catch with the cheese grater. Now left with a dark, strong tea I poured the tea into a measuring cup then put the tea back into the stainless steel pot. Now it’s time to add the olive oil. You’re going to want to add equal parts olive oil as tea mixture- hence the measuring cup. After adding the olive oil, let the tea-olive oil mixture simmer until all the water is evaporated. You’ll know that has happened when the mixture stops bubbling.
  3. Once all the water has evaporated, it’s time to add the beeswax! Take your now water-free mixture from the stove and start with about a half dollar size of beeswax to add. Stir. Test on a clean plate. Drop a small dollop onto the clean plate, if it hardens immediately you have the right consistency! If it doesn’t add a little bit more beeswax. Once the consistency is right you’re ready to pour it into your glass jar to cool! I used my individual tea strainer again to make sure my salve was pure and leaf-free.
Now you’ve got your finished product cooling! Let sit overnight before use. Smells heavenly, dries on the skin quickly, and provides instant moisture and relief! raw-honey-blog-3
]]>
raw-honey-blog-1

raw-honey-blog-1 By Caroline Phillips This winter the Localvore team is dippin’ into local beehives, making like a honey-bear and collecting that sweet nectar produced by our buzzing buddies. Our seasonal obsession with honey is not only delicious but also well founded in the number of awesome health benefits honey--specifically local honey--provides. And you know us, we’re all about local benefits! As most insects escape winter through hibernation, fortifying their bodies and eggs from the cold, the miraculous honeybee works as a community to survive in their non-native northern climate. Alone, a honeybee would die in the cold but within their hive the activity and warmth achieved through the busy buzz of brethren keeps them alive in subzero weather. These inspiring creatures create an inspiring product and like it’s creator, honey provides amazing benefits to those who cultivate and celebrate the flight of the honeybee. So, what exactly is honey anyway? It’s more than just the sweet, golden syrup we like to drizzle into our tea. Honey is a concentration of simple sugars created by honeybees from the nectar of flowers. To the honeybees themselves, honey is their carbohydrate providing energy and fuel. When talking about honey, we often think of pollen. Pollen is collected from flowers along with nectar and is a pure protein used by bees. Humans use pollen in powder form as a protein enhancer for certain foods and natural supplements. Honey, specifically raw honey, contains traces of pollen but its benefits are quite different. Pollen provides the protein and honey provides the antioxidants. When looking to add honey to your diet, look for raw and look for local. Raw honey has not been pasteurized, heated or processed in any way, therefore retaining all valuable minerals, vitamins, enzymes, and powerful antioxidants. This super food works best raw. Although many of our favorite honey recipes call for baking, we learned that the benefits raw honey provides reduce greatly when heated (heated honey = refined sugar) - that’s not to say these baked treats are any less delicious, and honey is still a wiser choice in the honey vs. refined sugar debate. What can raw honey do? A lot! Raw honey helps:
  • digestion
  • strengthen the immune system
  • eliminate allergies
  • stabilize blood pressure
  • balance blood sugar
  • calm nerves
  • relieve pain
  • treat ulcers, sore throats, colds, and indigestion
From ancient to modern times, raw honey can be found in beauty products and health products alike. Honey is a great anti-aging agent, moisturizer, and antibacterial. Got a zit? Put a dot of raw honey on it! What’s the big deal with buying local raw honey? Well, do you have allergies? Local honey is made by local honeybees collecting pollen specific to your neighborhood. Consuming a spoonful once or twice a day starting a few months before allergy season will slowly introduce local pollen to your system- preparing you to take on the great outdoors when everything is in full bloom. Supporting local beekeepers also supports your local market and nature. The cultivation of honeybees is an important step in protecting the natural flora of your community. [caption id="attachment_338845" align="alignright" width="225"]vermont-beekeepers-cookbook The Vermont Beekeepers Cookbook[/caption] In our honey craze, here at Localvore Today we have been trying out some home remedies inspired by The Vermont Beekeepers Cookbook! This sweet, Vermont favorite was found at the Sweet Clover Market in Essex returning home from an apple picking adventure at Chapin Orchards. Initially into the awesome baking recipes, I was pleasantly surprised to find an array of simple, home remedies in the last couple pages of the book. This holiday season I doled out homemade lip balms made of local honey, beeswax, and lavender. Never having made anything like this before, I am pleased to say I have become a convert to not only the honey craze but also the DIY simplicity of quality ingredients creating quality goods. The success of the lip balms encouraged the making of a hydrating salve, that I swear by! I brought my salve into the Localvore office and everyone was feeling the honey love! As a sensitive, dry skinned Vermonter I would recommend this gentle salve recipe as a year-round cure for winter-chapped to sunburned skin.

Honey Lavender Lip Balm

Ingredients: (I made a larger batch than this recipe calls for. The ingredients below will produce approx. 7 little pots of lip balm)
  • 1 tablespoon of beeswax
  • 3 tablespoons of carrier oil (basically, an oil of your choice- I used olive oil because it was what I had on hand, but next time I plan on playing with different oils)
  • 5-10 drops of lavender oil
  • 1 tsp of honey
  • a sprinkle of lavender for aesthetics (optional- made my lip balms look pretty but they did sometimes leave lavender on the lips)
  1. Get out your double boiler or, in my case create one by setting an oven safe pyrex in a pot with rolling boiling water. Mix all ingredients except the honey and aesthetic lavender into pot. Let ingredients slowly melt into liquid.
  2. Remove from heat and stir honey into mixture. Once combined, you are ready to pour your liquid lip balm into individual tin pots.
  3. Sprinkle lavender on top of balms and let cool overnight before use. Simple, easy lip balm. You'll never buy chap stick again!
raw-honey-blog-2

Calendula, Chamomile, Lavender, Peppermint Salve

(Note: The Beekeeper’s Cookbook calls this the Comfrey Salve, however, due to my sensitive skin I chose a Calendula base and the other herbs contain properties similar to what Comfrey offers. I also used Chocolate Peppermint because it was what I had on hand drying in my kitchen but a Wild Mint would do very well too) Ingredients:
  • 4 cups of herbs ( I used equal parts Calendula, Chamomile. Lavender, and Peppermint but you could use more or less of whichever herbal properties you desire most)
  • About 3/4 cup of olive oil (amount will be equal to “tea” solution created)
  • 1 oz. bar of beeswax (usually beeswax  comes in 1 oz bars, I bought mine at City Market and used about 3/4 of the bar)
  • Glass jar with lid
  1. Measure out herbs and place in stainless steel pot or colander with enough water to coat. The leaves should be coated but the water level is not high. The goal here is to make a very strong tea. Bring that water up to boiling then put it low at a simmer for at least 30 min. Don’t burn the leaves!
  2. Strain the tea into a separate pot or bowl. I actually used an upside down cheese grater for this step because I don’t own a sieve or strainer fine enough to catch the small leaves. I then used a small, individual tea strainer to “go fishing” for the loose bits I couldn’t catch with the cheese grater. Now left with a dark, strong tea I poured the tea into a measuring cup then put the tea back into the stainless steel pot. Now it’s time to add the olive oil. You’re going to want to add equal parts olive oil as tea mixture- hence the measuring cup. After adding the olive oil, let the tea-olive oil mixture simmer until all the water is evaporated. You’ll know that has happened when the mixture stops bubbling.
  3. Once all the water has evaporated, it’s time to add the beeswax! Take your now water-free mixture from the stove and start with about a half dollar size of beeswax to add. Stir. Test on a clean plate. Drop a small dollop onto the clean plate, if it hardens immediately you have the right consistency! If it doesn’t add a little bit more beeswax. Once the consistency is right you’re ready to pour it into your glass jar to cool! I used my individual tea strainer again to make sure my salve was pure and leaf-free.
Now you’ve got your finished product cooling! Let sit overnight before use. Smells heavenly, dries on the skin quickly, and provides instant moisture and relief! raw-honey-blog-3
]]>
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Trouble with the site? https://www.localvoretoday.com/2014/01/06/trouble-with-the-site/ https://www.localvoretoday.com/2014/01/06/trouble-with-the-site/#comments Tue, 07 Jan 2014 02:24:57 +0000 https://www.localvoretoday.com/?p=185121 https://www.whatsmydns.net/flush-dns.html You can clear your cache: http://www.wikihow.com/Clear-Your-Browser%27s-Cache You can try a different browser: (Close whatever browser you are using and open a different one) You can try our direct new IP address: https://54.209.171.51 Want to know more? You can read all about DNS propagation here: http://hosting.intermedia.net/support/kb/?id=797 Again - we are sari for any issues you might have. It is really our greatest wish that you come to our site and find it pleasing and easy to use. Speaking of which - what do you think? Let us know below - we'll give a lottery-style chosen 1 commenter 10 Localvore credits to use (they work just like cash) and we really want to know what you think! Thank you! Team Localvore Oh - and yes - the irony of posting something about not being able to see the site on a site you might not be able to see is not lost on us. We will mirror this on our Facebook page!]]> Trouble seeing the site or purchasing?

We are sorry – believe you me – the tech team here at Localvore Today spends all their days trying to make things as easy as possible. We either are trying to make things easier or planning on future easy-making things.

This change has been in the works for a while! We are trying to provide a smoother, more easy to see experience.

BUT – we moved the site from one server to another. While that change was relatively quick – the system of boxes and tubes that control the internet store records that do not refresh as quickly as we would like. If you are having trouble that is why. Some of the information might be be “old”. We have done everything we can to make the transition smooth, but this was an unavoidable maneuver. This new server will be faster and enable us to provide more services and open more locally-owned markets – which is our long-term goal. Vermont first. Then every where else.

What can you do to try and see the ‘new’ site?

You can flush your DNS:
https://www.whatsmydns.net/flush-dns.html

You can clear your cache:
http://www.wikihow.com/Clear-Your-Browser%27s-Cache

You can try a different browser:
(Close whatever browser you are using and open a different one)

You can try our direct new IP address:
https://54.209.171.51

Want to know more? You can read all about DNS propagation here:
http://hosting.intermedia.net/support/kb/?id=797

Again – we are sari for any issues you might have. It is really our greatest wish that you come to our site and find it pleasing and easy to use.

Speaking of which – what do you think? Let us know below – we’ll give a lottery-style chosen 1 commenter 10 Localvore credits to use (they work just like cash) and we really want to know what you think!

Thank you!
Team Localvore

Oh – and yes – the irony of posting something about not being able to see the site on a site you might not be able to see is not lost on us. We will mirror this on our Facebook page!

Trouble seeing the site or purchasing? We are sorry - believe you me - the tech team here at Localvore Today spends all their days trying to make things as easy as possible. We either are trying to make things easier or planning on future easy-making things. This change has been in the works for a while! We are trying to provide a smoother, more easy to see experience. BUT - we moved the site from one server to another. While that change was relatively quick - the system of boxes and tubes that control the internet store records that do not refresh as quickly as we would like. If you are having trouble that is why. Some of the information might be be "old". We have done everything we can to make the transition smooth, but this was an unavoidable maneuver. This new server will be faster and enable us to provide more services and open more locally-owned markets - which is our long-term goal. Vermont first. Then every where else. What can you do to try and see the 'new' site? You can flush your DNS: https://www.whatsmydns.net/flush-dns.html You can clear your cache: http://www.wikihow.com/Clear-Your-Browser%27s-Cache You can try a different browser: (Close whatever browser you are using and open a different one) You can try our direct new IP address: https://54.209.171.51 Want to know more? You can read all about DNS propagation here: http://hosting.intermedia.net/support/kb/?id=797 Again - we are sari for any issues you might have. It is really our greatest wish that you come to our site and find it pleasing and easy to use. Speaking of which - what do you think? Let us know below - we'll give a lottery-style chosen 1 commenter 10 Localvore credits to use (they work just like cash) and we really want to know what you think! Thank you! Team Localvore Oh - and yes - the irony of posting something about not being able to see the site on a site you might not be able to see is not lost on us. We will mirror this on our Facebook page!]]>
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King Street Ipad Raffle Winner! https://www.localvoretoday.com/2013/12/04/king-street-ipad-raffle-winner/ https://www.localvoretoday.com/2013/12/04/king-street-ipad-raffle-winner/#comments Wed, 04 Dec 2013 19:31:17 +0000 https://www.localvoretoday.com/?p=162829 The winner of the King Street Ipad Mini Raffle is Doug Kelley of Burlington! Congratulations Doug!

He will be picking up the Ipad soon, and we will have pics to follow!

The winner of the King Street Ipad Mini Raffle is Doug Kelley of Burlington! Congratulations Doug! He will be picking up the Ipad soon, and we will have pics to follow!]]>
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Fresh Eats: CSA-Filled Salad https://www.localvoretoday.com/2013/11/24/fresh-eats-csa-filled-salad/ https://www.localvoretoday.com/2013/11/24/fresh-eats-csa-filled-salad/#comments Sun, 24 Nov 2013 18:04:50 +0000 https://www.localvoretoday.com/?p=156301 salad2 Today, I was feeling especially inspired by my CSA basket and, given this rainy day and my craving for a free-form and organic meal, I decided to brighten up my lunch hour with a fresh, CSA-filled salad. How could you not be inspired by these local beauties?

radishpieces

I used the mesclun mix, beets, carrots, and radishes from my CSA basket and assembled a salad that was both splendid in look and taste. I piled a large handful mesclun mix in my bowl, shaved the beets, carrots, and radishes and added them on top. Next I added sprouted tofu (use any protein your local heart desires), a nice heaping of goat cheese from Does' Leap Farm in East Fairfield, VT, and then sprinkled sesame seeds, sea salt, and crushed red pepper flakes on top for an extra kick and crunch. Plus, the sesame seeds add a nice amount of calcium. Drizzle with this miso-sesame dressing and voila! you have a bright, life-filled, delicious and nutritious salad. Knowing that most of it grew up in a soil bed less than a mile from my home makes it taste that much better. I am still enjoying this bountiful bowl as I write to you. Are you participating in a CSA this winter? Tell us about your fresh eats and creations. Happy eating localvores! Cheers, Sarah

veggies

]]>
salad2

Today, I was feeling especially inspired by my CSA basket and, given this rainy day and my craving for a free-form and organic meal, I decided to brighten up my lunch hour with a fresh, CSA-filled salad. How could you not be inspired by these local beauties?

radishpieces

I used the mesclun mix, beets, carrots, and radishes from my CSA basket and assembled a salad that was both splendid in look and taste. I piled a large handful mesclun mix in my bowl, shaved the beets, carrots, and radishes and added them on top. Next I added sprouted tofu (use any protein your local heart desires), a nice heaping of goat cheese from Does’ Leap Farm in East Fairfield, VT, and then sprinkled sesame seeds, sea salt, and crushed red pepper flakes on top for an extra kick and crunch. Plus, the sesame seeds add a nice amount of calcium. Drizzle with this miso-sesame dressing and voila! you have a bright, life-filled, delicious and nutritious salad. Knowing that most of it grew up in a soil bed less than a mile from my home makes it taste that much better. I am still enjoying this bountiful bowl as I write to you. Are you participating in a CSA this winter? Tell us about your fresh eats and creations. Happy eating localvores!

Cheers,
Sarah

veggies

salad2 Today, I was feeling especially inspired by my CSA basket and, given this rainy day and my craving for a free-form and organic meal, I decided to brighten up my lunch hour with a fresh, CSA-filled salad. How could you not be inspired by these local beauties?

radishpieces

I used the mesclun mix, beets, carrots, and radishes from my CSA basket and assembled a salad that was both splendid in look and taste. I piled a large handful mesclun mix in my bowl, shaved the beets, carrots, and radishes and added them on top. Next I added sprouted tofu (use any protein your local heart desires), a nice heaping of goat cheese from Does' Leap Farm in East Fairfield, VT, and then sprinkled sesame seeds, sea salt, and crushed red pepper flakes on top for an extra kick and crunch. Plus, the sesame seeds add a nice amount of calcium. Drizzle with this miso-sesame dressing and voila! you have a bright, life-filled, delicious and nutritious salad. Knowing that most of it grew up in a soil bed less than a mile from my home makes it taste that much better. I am still enjoying this bountiful bowl as I write to you. Are you participating in a CSA this winter? Tell us about your fresh eats and creations. Happy eating localvores! Cheers, Sarah

veggies

]]>
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Aqua Vitea Kombucha is Fermenting a Sustainable Business in Vermont https://www.localvoretoday.com/2013/11/22/aqua-vitea-kombucha-is-fermenting-a-sustainable-business-in-vermont/ https://www.localvoretoday.com/2013/11/22/aqua-vitea-kombucha-is-fermenting-a-sustainable-business-in-vermont/#comments Fri, 22 Nov 2013 18:17:27 +0000 https://www.localvoretoday.com/?p=146254 aqua-viteaA year after building a state-of-the art brewing facility, Vermont beverage company Aqua Vitea is experiencing significant growth.  The new location provides the infrastructure  required to meet demand and expand distribution throughout the northeast, while continuing to innovate the brewing process. Aqua Vitea pioneered the in-store Kombucha On Tap business model starting at the Middlebury Co-op during the fall of 2007.  Now you can find Aqua Vitea Kombucha on tap throughout the northeast via self-serve Kombucha fountains in health food stores/ Co-ops, integrated into juices and smoothies at juice bars/ cafes, and on traditional tap systems in restaurants/ bars. With the recent explosion of national news and interest in Kombucha as a nourishing and probiotic beverage, Aqua Vitea is poised to reach more consumers who are passionate about healthy food choices. Aqua Vitea continues to expand their market area as they install Kombucha fountains (including multiple six tap fountains) and distribute kegs throughout the northeast. The bottled product enables new customers to try different flavors and an easy grab and go option.  Kombucha on tap allows customers to save money, save glass, try limited seasonal releases, and enjoy the freshest Kombucha possible. “As I look back and review the highlights and successes of 2013 and plan for 2014, I am very encouraged that our effortsand commitment to authentic Kombucha are being recognized and well received”, said Jeff Weaber, Aqua Vitea Founder and Imagineer. Aqua Vitea managed sustainable, consistent and significant growth during 2013.  A new Director of Operations and Sales and Distribution Manager as well as production and event staff were added to the growing team.  Aqua Vitea Kombucha cocktails were served at multiple events with a highlight being when Jeff Tweedy of Wilco mentioned Kombucha on stage in front of 7,500 fans at Wilco’s Solid Sound Festival at Mass MoCA in North Adams, MA. In addition to vending at the event, Aqua Vitea provided a professional bartender, Kombucha on tap and Kombucha cocktails in the artist lounge serving hundreds including performing artists along with their families and friends, leaving a lasting impact. Mike Kin has been with Aqua Vitea since 2008 and is Head Brewer/ Creative Director.  “As a painter and former naturalist for the Audubon Society, I tend to see most things as systems or environments in which many different elements are collaborating and competing.  If the system works, it is because all of these interactions have developed naturally and have reached a sort of homeostasis.  The more that we get to know our Kombucha cultures and the Kombucha ecosystem in general, the more fascinating and delicate those relationships are within.”  say’s Kin. “We have tried to create and continue to maintain a stable, healthy ecosystem for our Kombucha through our brewing processes so that it will help maintain a healthy one in your’s”, Kin added.  The research and development Aqua Vitea has done ensures consistent product and supports a scalable brewing system. Microflora and probiotics in the news shows a broadened awareness that the living environments in our guts are critical to a healthy immune system, metabolism and even brain function. kombucha-fill Mike McCarney, Director of Operations, joined Aqua Vitea earlier this year and acknowledges what went into building the new brewery as well as the talent behind the product and brand.  “Our brewery is a living organism that is a by-product of 8 years of hard work brewing Kombucha on the farm, 13 years of brewing experience and a vision for the future”, said Mike McCarney.  “Everyday I get to work with a talented, innovative and fun team that keeps one foot in the present, managing significant growth and delivering great Kombucha to our market, and one foot in the future, planning for new products and distribution channels.”  The outlook for 2014 is very exciting in the Kombucha industry as Kombucha reaches a broader market. This fall Aqua Vitea released a new flavor on Tap - Hibiscus Ginger Lime as well as two limited seasonal releases - Watermelon and Mulled Cider.  Local Bristol, VT artist Rory Jackson who is involved with a school in Ghana was the inspiration for Aqua Vitea’s new flavor based on a traditional West African drink called “bissop”.  Local farmer Eric Rozendaal from Rockville Market Farm sold Aqua Vitea his entire organic watermelon crop for the refreshing Watermelon Kombucha.  “Aqua Vitea has been working with local producers and sourcing local and/ or organic ingredients since our first days of operation” said Weaber. “Cultivating a symbiotic relationship with our community is a core value of Aqua Vitea”, Weaber added.  Hibiscus Ginger Lime and Watermelon have been well received by the Aqua Vitea loyal fan base.  Aqua Vitea’s branding and products finds balance in art, sense of place and community… all integral elements of Aqua Vitea’s Culture. Aqua Vitea recently launched a new website that serves as the interactive hub for vendors, customers and nourishing beverage enthusiasts. The site connects customers to the closest place to buy their Kombucha on tap or in bottle, shares the Aqua Vitea brand story through a visual and interactive experience, links to their social media platforms, and encourages visitors to contact Aqua Vitea.  What is Kombucha? Kombucha is an ancient energy boosting and body-purifying beverage from the Far East.  It is a fermented beverage made simply from tea, sugar, water, and a symbiotic culture of bacteria and yeast (SCOBY).  Through fermentation the beverage is transformed into an elixir full of potent organic and amino acids, beneficial bacteria (probiotics), live enzymes, vitamins, and minerals.  The result is a health promoting energy drink that tastes similar to aromatic sparkling cider. Aqua Vitea distinguishes itself from other producers by being the first company in the nation to sell fresh from in-store self serve fountains, allowing customers to re-use their own containers. This environmentally friendly and sustainable practice has saved over 5.4 tons of glass waste just in this year alone! Because of Aqua Vitea’s popularity their kombucha and cultured tea is available in grab and go bottles. Products: Currently Aqua Vitea offers 6 different flavors on tap of the freshest Kombucha in the Northeast including Original, Hibiscus Ginger Lime, Elderberry, Black Currant, Cranberry, and Ginger. Current seasonal limited releases include Watermelon and Mulled Cider.  Limited seasonal releases and Hibiscus Ginger Lime are not available in bottles. About Aqua Vitea: Aqua Vitea was started in 2006 by Jeff Weaber and Dr. Katina Martin. Jeff's background in brewing combined with Katina's training as a Naturopath and Acupuncturist led them to merge their passions and produce this beneficial beverage. They strive to use only the best organic ingredients, drawing on local sources whenever possible. Building a sustainable community that empowers people to be healthy is the underlying mission of Aqua Vitea Kombucha.

kombucha

]]>

aqua-vitea
A year after building a state-of-the art brewing facility, Vermont beverage company Aqua Vitea is experiencing significant growth.  The new location provides the infrastructure  required to meet demand and expand distribution throughout the northeast, while continuing to innovate the brewing process.

Aqua Vitea pioneered the in-store Kombucha On Tap business model starting at the Middlebury Co-op during the fall of 2007.  Now you can find Aqua Vitea Kombucha on tap throughout the northeast via self-serve Kombucha fountains in health food stores/ Co-ops, integrated into juices and smoothies at juice bars/ cafes, and on traditional tap systems in restaurants/ bars.

With the recent explosion of national news and interest in Kombucha as a nourishing and probiotic beverage, Aqua Vitea is poised to reach more consumers who are passionate about healthy food choices. Aqua Vitea continues to expand their market area as they install Kombucha fountains (including multiple six tap fountains) and distribute kegs throughout the northeast. The bottled product enables new customers to try different flavors and an easy grab and go option.  Kombucha on tap allows customers to save money, save glass, try limited seasonal releases, and enjoy the freshest Kombucha possible.

“As I look back and review the highlights and successes of 2013 and plan for 2014, I am very encouraged that our effortsand commitment to authentic Kombucha are being recognized and well received”, said Jeff Weaber, Aqua Vitea Founder and Imagineer. Aqua Vitea managed sustainable, consistent and significant growth during 2013.  A new Director of Operations and Sales and Distribution Manager as well as production and event staff were added to the growing team.  Aqua Vitea Kombucha cocktails were served at multiple events with a highlight being when

Jeff Tweedy of Wilco mentioned Kombucha on stage in front of 7,500 fans at Wilco’s Solid Sound Festival at Mass MoCA in North Adams, MA. In addition to vending at the event, Aqua Vitea provided a professional bartender, Kombucha on tap and Kombucha cocktails in the artist lounge serving hundreds including performing artists along with their families and friends, leaving a lasting impact.

Mike Kin has been with Aqua Vitea since 2008 and is Head Brewer/ Creative Director.  “As a painter and former naturalist for the Audubon Society, I tend to see most things as systems or environments in which many different elements are collaborating and competing.  If the system works, it is because all of these interactions have developed naturally and have reached a sort of homeostasis.  The more that we get to know our Kombucha cultures and the Kombucha ecosystem in general, the more fascinating and delicate those relationships are within.”  say’s Kin. “We have tried to create and continue to maintain a stable, healthy ecosystem for our Kombucha through our brewing processes so that it will help maintain a healthy one in your’s”, Kin added.  The research and development Aqua Vitea has done ensures consistent product and supports a scalable brewing system. Microflora and probiotics in the news shows a broadened awareness that the living environments in our guts are critical to a healthy immune system, metabolism and even brain function.

kombucha-fill

Mike McCarney, Director of Operations, joined Aqua Vitea earlier this year and acknowledges what went into building the new brewery as well as the talent behind the product and brand.  “Our brewery is a living organism that is a by-product of 8 years of hard work brewing Kombucha on the farm, 13 years of brewing experience and a vision for the future”, said Mike McCarney.  “Everyday I get to work with a talented, innovative and fun team that keeps one foot in the present, managing significant growth and delivering great Kombucha to our market, and one foot in the future, planning for new products and distribution channels.”  The outlook for 2014 is very exciting in the Kombucha industry as Kombucha reaches a broader market.

This fall Aqua Vitea released a new flavor on Tap – Hibiscus Ginger Lime as well as two limited seasonal releases – Watermelon and Mulled Cider.  Local Bristol, VT artist Rory Jackson who is involved with a school in Ghana was the inspiration for Aqua Vitea’s new flavor based on a traditional West African drink called “bissop”.  Local farmer Eric Rozendaal from Rockville Market Farm sold Aqua Vitea his entire organic watermelon crop for the refreshing Watermelon Kombucha.  “Aqua Vitea has been working with local producers and sourcing local and/ or organic ingredients since our first days of operation” said Weaber. “Cultivating a symbiotic relationship with our community is a core value of Aqua Vitea”, Weaber added.  Hibiscus Ginger Lime and Watermelon have been well received by the Aqua Vitea loyal fan base.  Aqua Vitea’s branding and products finds balance in art, sense of place and community… all integral elements of Aqua Vitea’s Culture.

Aqua Vitea recently launched a new website that serves as the interactive hub for vendors, customers and nourishing beverage enthusiasts. The site connects customers to the closest place to buy their Kombucha on tap or in bottle, shares the Aqua Vitea brand story through a visual and interactive experience, links to their social media platforms, and encourages visitors to contact Aqua Vitea. 

What is Kombucha?

Kombucha is an ancient energy boosting and body-purifying beverage from the Far East.  It is a fermented beverage made simply from tea, sugar, water, and a symbiotic culture of bacteria and yeast (SCOBY).  Through fermentation the beverage is transformed into an elixir full of potent organic and amino acids, beneficial bacteria (probiotics), live enzymes, vitamins, and minerals.  The result is a health promoting energy drink that tastes similar to aromatic sparkling cider.

Aqua Vitea distinguishes itself from other producers by being the first company in the nation to sell fresh from in-store self serve fountains, allowing customers to re-use their own containers. This environmentally friendly and sustainable practice has saved over 5.4 tons of glass waste just in this year alone! Because of Aqua Vitea’s popularity their kombucha and cultured tea is available in grab and go bottles.

Products:

Currently Aqua Vitea offers 6 different flavors on tap of the freshest Kombucha in the Northeast including Original, Hibiscus Ginger Lime, Elderberry, Black Currant, Cranberry, and Ginger. Current seasonal limited releases include Watermelon and Mulled Cider.  Limited seasonal releases and Hibiscus Ginger Lime are not available in bottles.

About Aqua Vitea:

Aqua Vitea was started in 2006 by Jeff Weaber and Dr. Katina Martin. Jeff’s background in brewing combined with Katina’s training as a Naturopath and Acupuncturist led them to merge their passions and produce this beneficial beverage. They strive to use only the best organic ingredients, drawing on local sources whenever possible. Building a sustainable community that empowers people to be healthy is the underlying mission of Aqua Vitea Kombucha.

kombucha

aqua-viteaA year after building a state-of-the art brewing facility, Vermont beverage company Aqua Vitea is experiencing significant growth.  The new location provides the infrastructure  required to meet demand and expand distribution throughout the northeast, while continuing to innovate the brewing process. Aqua Vitea pioneered the in-store Kombucha On Tap business model starting at the Middlebury Co-op during the fall of 2007.  Now you can find Aqua Vitea Kombucha on tap throughout the northeast via self-serve Kombucha fountains in health food stores/ Co-ops, integrated into juices and smoothies at juice bars/ cafes, and on traditional tap systems in restaurants/ bars. With the recent explosion of national news and interest in Kombucha as a nourishing and probiotic beverage, Aqua Vitea is poised to reach more consumers who are passionate about healthy food choices. Aqua Vitea continues to expand their market area as they install Kombucha fountains (including multiple six tap fountains) and distribute kegs throughout the northeast. The bottled product enables new customers to try different flavors and an easy grab and go option.  Kombucha on tap allows customers to save money, save glass, try limited seasonal releases, and enjoy the freshest Kombucha possible. “As I look back and review the highlights and successes of 2013 and plan for 2014, I am very encouraged that our effortsand commitment to authentic Kombucha are being recognized and well received”, said Jeff Weaber, Aqua Vitea Founder and Imagineer. Aqua Vitea managed sustainable, consistent and significant growth during 2013.  A new Director of Operations and Sales and Distribution Manager as well as production and event staff were added to the growing team.  Aqua Vitea Kombucha cocktails were served at multiple events with a highlight being when Jeff Tweedy of Wilco mentioned Kombucha on stage in front of 7,500 fans at Wilco’s Solid Sound Festival at Mass MoCA in North Adams, MA. In addition to vending at the event, Aqua Vitea provided a professional bartender, Kombucha on tap and Kombucha cocktails in the artist lounge serving hundreds including performing artists along with their families and friends, leaving a lasting impact. Mike Kin has been with Aqua Vitea since 2008 and is Head Brewer/ Creative Director.  “As a painter and former naturalist for the Audubon Society, I tend to see most things as systems or environments in which many different elements are collaborating and competing.  If the system works, it is because all of these interactions have developed naturally and have reached a sort of homeostasis.  The more that we get to know our Kombucha cultures and the Kombucha ecosystem in general, the more fascinating and delicate those relationships are within.”  say’s Kin. “We have tried to create and continue to maintain a stable, healthy ecosystem for our Kombucha through our brewing processes so that it will help maintain a healthy one in your’s”, Kin added.  The research and development Aqua Vitea has done ensures consistent product and supports a scalable brewing system. Microflora and probiotics in the news shows a broadened awareness that the living environments in our guts are critical to a healthy immune system, metabolism and even brain function. kombucha-fill Mike McCarney, Director of Operations, joined Aqua Vitea earlier this year and acknowledges what went into building the new brewery as well as the talent behind the product and brand.  “Our brewery is a living organism that is a by-product of 8 years of hard work brewing Kombucha on the farm, 13 years of brewing experience and a vision for the future”, said Mike McCarney.  “Everyday I get to work with a talented, innovative and fun team that keeps one foot in the present, managing significant growth and delivering great Kombucha to our market, and one foot in the future, planning for new products and distribution channels.”  The outlook for 2014 is very exciting in the Kombucha industry as Kombucha reaches a broader market. This fall Aqua Vitea released a new flavor on Tap - Hibiscus Ginger Lime as well as two limited seasonal releases - Watermelon and Mulled Cider.  Local Bristol, VT artist Rory Jackson who is involved with a school in Ghana was the inspiration for Aqua Vitea’s new flavor based on a traditional West African drink called “bissop”.  Local farmer Eric Rozendaal from Rockville Market Farm sold Aqua Vitea his entire organic watermelon crop for the refreshing Watermelon Kombucha.  “Aqua Vitea has been working with local producers and sourcing local and/ or organic ingredients since our first days of operation” said Weaber. “Cultivating a symbiotic relationship with our community is a core value of Aqua Vitea”, Weaber added.  Hibiscus Ginger Lime and Watermelon have been well received by the Aqua Vitea loyal fan base.  Aqua Vitea’s branding and products finds balance in art, sense of place and community… all integral elements of Aqua Vitea’s Culture. Aqua Vitea recently launched a new website that serves as the interactive hub for vendors, customers and nourishing beverage enthusiasts. The site connects customers to the closest place to buy their Kombucha on tap or in bottle, shares the Aqua Vitea brand story through a visual and interactive experience, links to their social media platforms, and encourages visitors to contact Aqua Vitea.  What is Kombucha? Kombucha is an ancient energy boosting and body-purifying beverage from the Far East.  It is a fermented beverage made simply from tea, sugar, water, and a symbiotic culture of bacteria and yeast (SCOBY).  Through fermentation the beverage is transformed into an elixir full of potent organic and amino acids, beneficial bacteria (probiotics), live enzymes, vitamins, and minerals.  The result is a health promoting energy drink that tastes similar to aromatic sparkling cider. Aqua Vitea distinguishes itself from other producers by being the first company in the nation to sell fresh from in-store self serve fountains, allowing customers to re-use their own containers. This environmentally friendly and sustainable practice has saved over 5.4 tons of glass waste just in this year alone! Because of Aqua Vitea’s popularity their kombucha and cultured tea is available in grab and go bottles. Products: Currently Aqua Vitea offers 6 different flavors on tap of the freshest Kombucha in the Northeast including Original, Hibiscus Ginger Lime, Elderberry, Black Currant, Cranberry, and Ginger. Current seasonal limited releases include Watermelon and Mulled Cider.  Limited seasonal releases and Hibiscus Ginger Lime are not available in bottles. About Aqua Vitea: Aqua Vitea was started in 2006 by Jeff Weaber and Dr. Katina Martin. Jeff's background in brewing combined with Katina's training as a Naturopath and Acupuncturist led them to merge their passions and produce this beneficial beverage. They strive to use only the best organic ingredients, drawing on local sources whenever possible. Building a sustainable community that empowers people to be healthy is the underlying mission of Aqua Vitea Kombucha.

kombucha

]]>
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Localvore Adventures in Cooking: Black Pepper Tofu https://www.localvoretoday.com/2013/11/21/localvore-adventures-in-cooking/ https://www.localvoretoday.com/2013/11/21/localvore-adventures-in-cooking/#comments Thu, 21 Nov 2013 23:03:01 +0000 https://www.localvoretoday.com/?p=154794 Intervale Food Hub CSA shares or from our local co-cop, City Market! What are you making with your CSA shares these days? Tell us in the comments! -Meg  ]]> Yesterday Sarah and I got together and made the Black Pepper Tofu recipe from my favorite cookbook, Plenty.

We modified the recipe slightly, using liquid aminos instead of the two different kinds of soy sauce the recipe called for, and the leeks from our CSA in place of the shallots. We also used coconut butter in place of vegetable oil, just because of personal preference.

plenty-cookbook final product udon sarah ingredients

We learned the secret to making perfectly crispy tofu is to cube it, lightly coat it in something to give it some crunch, fry it up on its own first until it’s golden on all sides, and then let it sit on some paper towels and mix it in with the rest of the ingredients at the end. We’ve always just thrown the tofu in with the veggies to fry in the past — this way worked much better!

This recipe is fresh, simple, full of flavor, and easily amendable. We had an easy time substituting ingredients without sacrificing in flavor or texture.

The heaping quantities of ginger, garlic, red chilies and black pepper give this dish a lot of umph — so we just lightly dressed some udon noodles in some sesame oil to go along with the tofu topping.

For a side, we roasted beets, carrots and sweet potatoes (also from our CSA shares)!

Everything for this meal was sourced either directly from our Intervale Food Hub CSA shares or from our local co-cop, City Market! What are you making with your CSA shares these days? Tell us in the comments!

-Meg

 

Yesterday Sarah and I got together and made the Black Pepper Tofu recipe from my favorite cookbook, Plenty. We modified the recipe slightly, using liquid aminos instead of the two different kinds of soy sauce the recipe called for, and the leeks from our CSA in place of the shallots. We also used coconut butter in place of vegetable oil, just because of personal preference. [gallery ids="154780,154793,154783,154782,154781"] We learned the secret to making perfectly crispy tofu is to cube it, lightly coat it in something to give it some crunch, fry it up on its own first until it's golden on all sides, and then let it sit on some paper towels and mix it in with the rest of the ingredients at the end. We've always just thrown the tofu in with the veggies to fry in the past -- this way worked much better! This recipe is fresh, simple, full of flavor, and easily amendable. We had an easy time substituting ingredients without sacrificing in flavor or texture. The heaping quantities of ginger, garlic, red chilies and black pepper give this dish a lot of umph -- so we just lightly dressed some udon noodles in some sesame oil to go along with the tofu topping. For a side, we roasted beets, carrots and sweet potatoes (also from our CSA shares)! Everything for this meal was sourced either directly from our Intervale Food Hub CSA shares or from our local co-cop, City Market! What are you making with your CSA shares these days? Tell us in the comments! -Meg  ]]>
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King Steet Center Raise The Bar Campaign https://www.localvoretoday.com/2013/11/15/king-steet-center-raise-the-bar-campaign/ https://www.localvoretoday.com/2013/11/15/king-steet-center-raise-the-bar-campaign/#comments Fri, 15 Nov 2013 14:51:10 +0000 https://www.localvoretoday.com/?p=146405 Social Media #BTV Edition:   Raise the Bar Capital Campaign: King Street Center is planning to re-construct & renovate its current building at 87 King Street. They look forward to serving more children and families - as well as delivering even more relevant, responsive programs starting in 2015. As part of the community, and as part of the social media landscape here, Localvore Today is helping raise funds for this awesome project - the goal is for the many parts of the #BTV* to raise $10,000 - some of which this contest will cover - that will pay for naming rights to a tutoring room in the new space - with the idea that all the web and social businesses in town will be encouraged to tutor the youths on their particular web expertise! So won't you help spread the word? Won't you enter the raffle yourself? Five bucks get you a chance to win an iPad Mini! Together we can raise the bar and help be a positive agent of change for the next generation!   *The #BTV (BTV  hashtag) is used on Twitter to indicate the tweet is about Burlington - BTV is our airport code - so all those tagged tweets can be filtered and viewed as a stream. Want to know what is going on in Burlington? Follow the BTV hashtag! Example here! Other Vermont hashtags include #VT  #VERMONT  #SouthBurlington #MontP]]> Social Media #BTV Edition:

 

Raise the Bar Capital Campaign: King Street Center is planning to re-construct & renovate its current building at 87 King Street. They look forward to serving more children and families – as well as delivering even more relevant, responsive programs starting in 2015.

As part of the community, and as part of the social media landscape here, Localvore Today is helping raise funds for this awesome project – the goal is for the many parts of the #BTV* to raise $10,000 – some of which this contest will cover – that will pay for naming rights to a tutoring room in the new space – with the idea that all the web and social businesses in town will be encouraged to tutor the youths on their particular web expertise!

So won’t you help spread the word? Won’t you enter the raffle yourself? Five bucks get you a chance to win an iPad Mini! Together we can raise the bar and help be a positive agent of change for the next generation!

 

*The #BTV (BTV  hashtag) is used on Twitter to indicate the tweet is about Burlington – BTV is our airport code – so all those tagged tweets can be filtered and viewed as a stream. Want to know what is going on in Burlington? Follow the BTV hashtag! Example here! Other Vermont hashtags include #VT  #VERMONT  #SouthBurlington #MontP

Social Media #BTV Edition:

  Raise the Bar Capital Campaign: King Street Center is planning to re-construct & renovate its current building at 87 King Street. They look forward to serving more children and families - as well as delivering even more relevant, responsive programs starting in 2015. As part of the community, and as part of the social media landscape here, Localvore Today is helping raise funds for this awesome project - the goal is for the many parts of the #BTV* to raise $10,000 - some of which this contest will cover - that will pay for naming rights to a tutoring room in the new space - with the idea that all the web and social businesses in town will be encouraged to tutor the youths on their particular web expertise! So won't you help spread the word? Won't you enter the raffle yourself? Five bucks get you a chance to win an iPad Mini! Together we can raise the bar and help be a positive agent of change for the next generation!   *The #BTV (BTV  hashtag) is used on Twitter to indicate the tweet is about Burlington - BTV is our airport code - so all those tagged tweets can be filtered and viewed as a stream. Want to know what is going on in Burlington? Follow the BTV hashtag! Example here! Other Vermont hashtags include #VT  #VERMONT  #SouthBurlington #MontP]]>
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A Recipe from Chef Contos’ Kitchen: Kopanisti & Whole Wheat Crackers https://www.localvoretoday.com/2013/11/06/chef-contos-recipe/ https://www.localvoretoday.com/2013/11/06/chef-contos-recipe/#comments Wed, 06 Nov 2013 19:28:39 +0000 https://www.localvoretoday.com/?p=140566  Kopanisti (Whipped Feta Dip)
  • 12-ounces Vermont feta cheese
  • 1/4 cup olive oil
  • 2-3 garlic cloves
  • 1 teaspoon freshly squeezed lemon juice
  • 8 pepperoncini peppers, stems removed
  • Pinch of finely ground pepper

IMG_6219

  Place all ingredients in the food processor and mix well.  Screen Shot 2013-11-06 at 12.29.51 PM

Transfer mixture into a serving bowl and enjoy with vegetables (radishes or sliced cucumber), pita chips, crackers, spread on sandwiches or a wonderful garnish for lamb. Can be made a day ahead of time.

IMG_6239

Garnish options - chopped parsley, chopped mint, aleppo chilies, smokey paprika, red pepper flakes, or lemon zest.

Whole Wheat Crackers

Ingredients:

  • 3 cups whole wheat pastry flour
  • 1 teaspoon fine-grain sea salt
  • 1 cup warm water
  • 1/3 cup extra virgin olive oil
  • garnish with paprika

Screen Shot 2013-11-06 at 12.29.19 PM

Add all ingredients to the bowl fitted to an electric mixer with the paddle attachment. Mix well and knead for 7-8 minutes. Dough will form a ball and become smooth on the surface. Remove dough from mixer and place on counter and cover well with plastic. Let rest 40 minutes. Preheat oven to 450 degrees.

Screen Shot 2013-11-06 at 12.27.47 PM

Cut dough into three sections and on a floured surface roll out until thin. Cut into desired shapes and sizes. I like to use a fluted pasta cutter to have a petty edge. Place close together on a baking sheet and bake for about 8-10 minutes or until bottoms of crackers become a touch golden. Remove from oven and place on cooking rack, repeat with rest of dough. Store in an airtight container for one week. Garnish with paprika!

]]>
 Kopanisti (Whipped Feta Dip)
  • 12-ounces Vermont feta cheese
  • 1/4 cup olive oil
  • 2-3 garlic cloves
  • 1 teaspoon freshly squeezed lemon juice
  • 8 pepperoncini peppers, stems removed
  • Pinch of finely ground pepper

IMG_6219

 

Place all ingredients in the food processor and mix well. 

Screen Shot 2013-11-06 at 12.29.51 PM

Transfer mixture into a serving bowl and enjoy with vegetables (radishes or sliced cucumber), pita chips, crackers, spread on sandwiches or a wonderful garnish for lamb. Can be made a day ahead of time.

IMG_6239

Garnish options – chopped parsley, chopped mint, aleppo chilies, smokey paprika, red pepper flakes, or lemon zest.

Whole Wheat Crackers

Ingredients:

  • 3 cups whole wheat pastry flour
  • 1 teaspoon fine-grain sea salt
  • 1 cup warm water
  • 1/3 cup extra virgin olive oil
  • garnish with paprika

Screen Shot 2013-11-06 at 12.29.19 PM

Add all ingredients to the bowl fitted to an electric mixer with the paddle attachment. Mix well and knead for 7-8 minutes. Dough will form a ball and become smooth on the surface. Remove dough from mixer and place on counter and cover well with plastic. Let rest 40 minutes. Preheat oven to 450 degrees.

Screen Shot 2013-11-06 at 12.27.47 PM

Cut dough into three sections and on a floured surface roll out until thin. Cut into desired shapes and sizes. I like to use a fluted pasta cutter to have a petty edge. Place close together on a baking sheet and bake for about 8-10 minutes or until bottoms of crackers become a touch golden. Remove from oven and place on cooking rack, repeat with rest of dough. Store in an airtight container for one week. Garnish with paprika!

 Kopanisti (Whipped Feta Dip)

  • 12-ounces Vermont feta cheese
  • 1/4 cup olive oil
  • 2-3 garlic cloves
  • 1 teaspoon freshly squeezed lemon juice
  • 8 pepperoncini peppers, stems removed
  • Pinch of finely ground pepper

IMG_6219

  Place all ingredients in the food processor and mix well.  Screen Shot 2013-11-06 at 12.29.51 PM

Transfer mixture into a serving bowl and enjoy with vegetables (radishes or sliced cucumber), pita chips, crackers, spread on sandwiches or a wonderful garnish for lamb. Can be made a day ahead of time.

IMG_6239

Garnish options - chopped parsley, chopped mint, aleppo chilies, smokey paprika, red pepper flakes, or lemon zest.

Whole Wheat Crackers

Ingredients:

  • 3 cups whole wheat pastry flour
  • 1 teaspoon fine-grain sea salt
  • 1 cup warm water
  • 1/3 cup extra virgin olive oil
  • garnish with paprika

Screen Shot 2013-11-06 at 12.29.19 PM

Add all ingredients to the bowl fitted to an electric mixer with the paddle attachment. Mix well and knead for 7-8 minutes. Dough will form a ball and become smooth on the surface. Remove dough from mixer and place on counter and cover well with plastic. Let rest 40 minutes. Preheat oven to 450 degrees.

Screen Shot 2013-11-06 at 12.27.47 PM

Cut dough into three sections and on a floured surface roll out until thin. Cut into desired shapes and sizes. I like to use a fluted pasta cutter to have a petty edge. Place close together on a baking sheet and bake for about 8-10 minutes or until bottoms of crackers become a touch golden. Remove from oven and place on cooking rack, repeat with rest of dough. Store in an airtight container for one week. Garnish with paprika!

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Revolution Kitchen https://www.localvoretoday.com/2013/10/17/revolution-kitchen/ https://www.localvoretoday.com/2013/10/17/revolution-kitchen/#comments Thu, 17 Oct 2013 16:38:13 +0000 https://www.localvoretoday.com/?p=121083 img_7686

Before opening Revolution Kitchen over on Center Street in Burlington, owners Peter and Debra Maisel were the faces behind Luna 61, a macrobiotic restaurant located in Tivoli, New York.  They had such a faithful following that customers were coined “lunatics” (or maybe it was all the delicious entrees and desserts driving them crazy!) Now the Maisels are on their fifth restaurant venture and these seasoned chefs are introducing Burlington to some innovative vegan and vegetarian dishes.

The eclectic menu at Revolution Kitchen is inspired by Peter, a graduate of The Natural Gourmet Institute in Manhattan, and Debra, a self-taught baker with a mean recipe for banana cream pie.  There isn’t just one flavor in this buzzing kitchen. You can find Asian, Mexican, and Italian-inspired dishes that are simultaneously simple and loaded with flavor. “We change our menu with the seasons and try to use as many local ingredients as possible,” says Debra. “We like to keep it simple and use less ingredients to keep the flavors alive.” These guys are true localvores. Their local love and support is deep rooted and genuine and started when Debra and Peter used to trade food for produce with local farmers. They didn’t know it then, but the two were participating in the slow food movement and building long-lasting bonds with farmers in their community. “We just did it because the farmers in our community needed to be supported,” Debra says. The food at Revolution Kitchen is a testament to their dedication to the local food scene, and not to mention a great display of their wildly creative cooking skills.  During my visit to the kitchen, I sat at the bar and behind me was a huge chalkboard with Thank you farms and purveyors written across the top.  Underneath it was a list of local farms and businesses that Revolution Kitchen was using that week, like Arethusa Farms, Boggy Meadow, Vermont Creamery, and many more. When I visited the kitchen, Peter made me a tofu dish. I know, I know, the dreaded T word-- that bland, white mushy stuff that confuses some and is abhorred by others.  Revolution Kitchen will make you a believer in this stuff. For real. The nori, pumpkin, and sesame seed encrusted tofu was served over semolina noodles and topped with veggies and dynamite pesto. Debra even added an extra touch and topped the plate with some beautiful purple flowers. The manager leaned over the bar and jokingly said, “You know that’s talapia right?” If I didn’t know better, I could have been convinced that it actually was something other than tofu. The dish was substantial, satisfying, and perfectly textured.  The combination of those three seeds made for a crust and crunch better than any breaded fish I’ve had. And man, that pesto.  That pesto popped with both color and flavor, complementing the tofu with an herbaceous twist.

rev1

Instead of trying to disguise the flavor or the texture of the tofu (something I’m guilty of in my own kitchen), Peter used it to his advantage, much like a painter and his canvas.  It starts out plain and boring until Peter transforms it into something delicious, wholesome, and dare I say…revolutionary!

rev2

There’s a certain vibration circling through the restaurant with its exposed brick walls and cozy bar area. The staff at Revolution Kitchen is enthusiastic about bringing worldly flavors and new combinations to the Burlington area.  They’re excited to play around with different ingredients and transmute them into something fresh, clean, and powerful.  It’s not about being a vegetarian, vegan, or carnivore.  It’s not about certain food restrictions or eating habits. It’s simpler than that. At Revolution Kitchen, where they are always accommodating to any food preferences, it’s about giving new life to food.  It’s about delivering quality food to people who care about their community.  It’s about utilizing the flavors that the land of Vermont graces us with.  If your taste buds like to dance and you’re down with eating ingredients that grow close to home, you’ll love what they’re doing over at Revolution Kitchen.  Expand your belly, expand your mind. It’s a revolution people!

img_7728-1

]]>
img_7686

Before opening Revolution Kitchen over on Center Street in Burlington, owners Peter and Debra Maisel were the faces behind Luna 61, a macrobiotic restaurant located in Tivoli, New York.  They had such a faithful following that customers were coined “lunatics” (or maybe it was all the delicious entrees and desserts driving them crazy!) Now the Maisels are on their fifth restaurant venture and these seasoned chefs are introducing Burlington to some innovative vegan and vegetarian dishes.

The eclectic menu at Revolution Kitchen is inspired by Peter, a graduate of The Natural Gourmet Institute in Manhattan, and Debra, a self-taught baker with a mean recipe for banana cream pie.  There isn’t just one flavor in this buzzing kitchen. You can find Asian, Mexican, and Italian-inspired dishes that are simultaneously simple and loaded with flavor.

“We change our menu with the seasons and try to use as many local ingredients as possible,” says Debra. “We like to keep it simple and use less ingredients to keep the flavors alive.”

These guys are true localvores. Their local love and support is deep rooted and genuine and started when Debra and Peter used to trade food for produce with local farmers. They didn’t know it then, but the two were participating in the slow food movement and building long-lasting bonds with farmers in their community.

“We just did it because the farmers in our community needed to be supported,” Debra says.

The food at Revolution Kitchen is a testament to their dedication to the local food scene, and not to mention a great display of their wildly creative cooking skills.  During my visit to the kitchen, I sat at the bar and behind me was a huge chalkboard with Thank you farms and purveyors written across the top.  Underneath it was a list of local farms and businesses that Revolution Kitchen was using that week, like Arethusa Farms, Boggy Meadow, Vermont Creamery, and many more.

When I visited the kitchen, Peter made me a tofu dish. I know, I know, the dreaded T word– that bland, white mushy stuff that confuses some and is abhorred by others.  Revolution Kitchen will make you a believer in this stuff. For real. The nori, pumpkin, and sesame seed encrusted tofu was served over semolina noodles and topped with veggies and dynamite pesto. Debra even added an extra touch and topped the plate with some beautiful purple flowers. The manager leaned over the bar and jokingly said, “You know that’s talapia right?” If I didn’t know better, I could have been convinced that it actually was something other than tofu. The dish was substantial, satisfying, and perfectly textured.  The combination of those three seeds made for a crust and crunch better than any breaded fish I’ve had. And man, that pesto.  That pesto popped with both color and flavor, complementing the tofu with an herbaceous twist.

rev1

Instead of trying to disguise the flavor or the texture of the tofu (something I’m guilty of in my own kitchen), Peter used it to his advantage, much like a painter and his canvas.  It starts out plain and boring until Peter transforms it into something delicious, wholesome, and dare I say…revolutionary!

rev2

There’s a certain vibration circling through the restaurant with its exposed brick walls and cozy bar area. The staff at Revolution Kitchen is enthusiastic about bringing worldly flavors and new combinations to the Burlington area.  They’re excited to play around with different ingredients and transmute them into something fresh, clean, and powerful.  It’s not about being a vegetarian, vegan, or carnivore.  It’s not about certain food restrictions or eating habits. It’s simpler than that. At Revolution Kitchen, where they are always accommodating to any food preferences, it’s about giving new life to food.  It’s about delivering quality food to people who care about their community.  It’s about utilizing the flavors that the land of Vermont graces us with.  If your taste buds like to dance and you’re down with eating ingredients that grow close to home, you’ll love what they’re doing over at Revolution Kitchen.  Expand your belly, expand your mind. It’s a revolution people!

img_7728-1

img_7686

Before opening Revolution Kitchen over on Center Street in Burlington, owners Peter and Debra Maisel were the faces behind Luna 61, a macrobiotic restaurant located in Tivoli, New York.  They had such a faithful following that customers were coined “lunatics” (or maybe it was all the delicious entrees and desserts driving them crazy!) Now the Maisels are on their fifth restaurant venture and these seasoned chefs are introducing Burlington to some innovative vegan and vegetarian dishes.

The eclectic menu at Revolution Kitchen is inspired by Peter, a graduate of The Natural Gourmet Institute in Manhattan, and Debra, a self-taught baker with a mean recipe for banana cream pie.  There isn’t just one flavor in this buzzing kitchen. You can find Asian, Mexican, and Italian-inspired dishes that are simultaneously simple and loaded with flavor. “We change our menu with the seasons and try to use as many local ingredients as possible,” says Debra. “We like to keep it simple and use less ingredients to keep the flavors alive.” These guys are true localvores. Their local love and support is deep rooted and genuine and started when Debra and Peter used to trade food for produce with local farmers. They didn’t know it then, but the two were participating in the slow food movement and building long-lasting bonds with farmers in their community. “We just did it because the farmers in our community needed to be supported,” Debra says. The food at Revolution Kitchen is a testament to their dedication to the local food scene, and not to mention a great display of their wildly creative cooking skills.  During my visit to the kitchen, I sat at the bar and behind me was a huge chalkboard with Thank you farms and purveyors written across the top.  Underneath it was a list of local farms and businesses that Revolution Kitchen was using that week, like Arethusa Farms, Boggy Meadow, Vermont Creamery, and many more. When I visited the kitchen, Peter made me a tofu dish. I know, I know, the dreaded T word-- that bland, white mushy stuff that confuses some and is abhorred by others.  Revolution Kitchen will make you a believer in this stuff. For real. The nori, pumpkin, and sesame seed encrusted tofu was served over semolina noodles and topped with veggies and dynamite pesto. Debra even added an extra touch and topped the plate with some beautiful purple flowers. The manager leaned over the bar and jokingly said, “You know that’s talapia right?” If I didn’t know better, I could have been convinced that it actually was something other than tofu. The dish was substantial, satisfying, and perfectly textured.  The combination of those three seeds made for a crust and crunch better than any breaded fish I’ve had. And man, that pesto.  That pesto popped with both color and flavor, complementing the tofu with an herbaceous twist.

rev1

Instead of trying to disguise the flavor or the texture of the tofu (something I’m guilty of in my own kitchen), Peter used it to his advantage, much like a painter and his canvas.  It starts out plain and boring until Peter transforms it into something delicious, wholesome, and dare I say…revolutionary!

rev2

There’s a certain vibration circling through the restaurant with its exposed brick walls and cozy bar area. The staff at Revolution Kitchen is enthusiastic about bringing worldly flavors and new combinations to the Burlington area.  They’re excited to play around with different ingredients and transmute them into something fresh, clean, and powerful.  It’s not about being a vegetarian, vegan, or carnivore.  It’s not about certain food restrictions or eating habits. It’s simpler than that. At Revolution Kitchen, where they are always accommodating to any food preferences, it’s about giving new life to food.  It’s about delivering quality food to people who care about their community.  It’s about utilizing the flavors that the land of Vermont graces us with.  If your taste buds like to dance and you’re down with eating ingredients that grow close to home, you’ll love what they’re doing over at Revolution Kitchen.  Expand your belly, expand your mind. It’s a revolution people!

img_7728-1

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Hen of the Wood Burlington: It’s here. Finally. https://www.localvoretoday.com/2013/10/07/hen-of-the-wood-burlington-its-here-finally/ https://www.localvoretoday.com/2013/10/07/hen-of-the-wood-burlington-its-here-finally/#comments Mon, 07 Oct 2013 20:11:32 +0000 https://www.localvoretoday.com/?p=115839 At Hen of the Wood Burlington, the food is uncomplicated and down-to-earth, allowing their premium ingredients to take center stage. And the atmosphere is second-to none. They craft daily changing menus based on the wealth of high quality ingredients found only miles from the restaurant in the lush Green Mountains and Champlain Valley.

The Localvore team enjoyed a gorgeous evening at the soft opening on Sunday night, and we can't wait to make their cozy fireside bar our regular hangout this winter. Experience this true Vermont dining experience in Burlington, Vermont on Cherry Street right by Hotel Vermont. Finally open to the public on Wednesday, October 9th 2013.

Make your reservations soon, or forever hold your peace.

802.540.0534

*Just in case you were wondering...yes, that is Heady Topper on draft. In a wine glass.

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bar1 crew bar1 eric ham HenOysters butcher

At Hen of the Wood Burlington, the food is uncomplicated and down-to-earth, allowing their premium ingredients to take center stage. And the atmosphere is second-to none. They craft daily changing menus based on the wealth of high quality ingredients found only miles from the restaurant in the lush Green Mountains and Champlain Valley.

The Localvore team enjoyed a gorgeous evening at the soft opening on Sunday night, and we can’t wait to make their cozy fireside bar our regular hangout this winter. Experience this true Vermont dining experience in Burlington, Vermont on Cherry Street right by Hotel Vermont. Finally open to the public on Wednesday, October 9th 2013.

Make your reservations soon, or forever hold your peace.

802.540.0534

*Just in case you were wondering…yes, that is Heady Topper on draft. In a wine glass.

[gallery ids="115786,115784,115829,115789,115788,115787,115785"]

At Hen of the Wood Burlington, the food is uncomplicated and down-to-earth, allowing their premium ingredients to take center stage. And the atmosphere is second-to none. They craft daily changing menus based on the wealth of high quality ingredients found only miles from the restaurant in the lush Green Mountains and Champlain Valley.

The Localvore team enjoyed a gorgeous evening at the soft opening on Sunday night, and we can't wait to make their cozy fireside bar our regular hangout this winter. Experience this true Vermont dining experience in Burlington, Vermont on Cherry Street right by Hotel Vermont. Finally open to the public on Wednesday, October 9th 2013.

Make your reservations soon, or forever hold your peace.

802.540.0534

*Just in case you were wondering...yes, that is Heady Topper on draft. In a wine glass.

]]>
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Hen of the Wood Restaurant Says “Hello, Burlington” https://www.localvoretoday.com/2013/09/23/hen-of-the-wood-restaurant-says-hello-burlington/ https://www.localvoretoday.com/2013/09/23/hen-of-the-wood-restaurant-says-hello-burlington/#comments Mon, 23 Sep 2013 17:18:35 +0000 https://www.localvoretoday.com/?p=108210 Now that's farm to table! (Photo Cred: Denise Fitzgibbon)

[caption id="attachment_109030" align="alignleft" width="225"]Now that's farm to table! (Photo Cred: Denise Fitzgibbon) Now that's farm to table! (Photo Cred: Denise Fitzgibbon)[/caption] Okay, you’ve heard it all before – Hen of the Wood is opening in Burlington right next to the also new and fabulous Hotel Vermont.  Are they behind schedule for their opening?  Yup.  Will you care when you take that first bite of wood fire kissed local deliciousness?  We doubt it. So why all the hype?  Is Hen of the Wood really that good?!? You certainly don’t have to go far to find a story about how chef-owner Eric Warnstedt is the greatest thing since sliced bread.  In fact, rumor has it, he may have actually invented sliced bread… and the internet.  It also wouldn’t be hard to find many-a-glowing review of the sensational dining experience that he and partner William McNeill have cultivated with their uber-successful restaurant in Waterbury over the last 8 years. You have dined with them in Waterbury, haven’t you?  No?  Well, allow us to share what people more objective than ourselves have said: “sitting 300 miles south, in my apartment in New York, it’s difficult to think of a restaurant here in the city that can generate such feelings of satisfaction, fulfillment, culinary pleasure and near-joy as Hen of the Wood. But as I’ve implied, I’m sort of in love with the joint” – Mark Bittman, New York Times You realize the famous New York Times food critic has eaten EVERYWHERE… like, in the world.  Take his word, not ours. Well, we don’t really want to sit here and regurgitate a bunch of press and awards for you – but if you’re bored – Google that time Chef Eric was on the cover of Food & Wine Magazine as one of the top new chefs in the country; or the multiple James Beard Award Nominations; Yankee, Gourmet, Restaurant Insider and Boston Magazines all say the same thing; as does their recent Montreal Gazette review paired with yet another Seven Daysie from readers like you. What we will aim to do over the next couple weeks, is take you a little behind the scenes, should it interest you… [caption id="attachment_109033" align="alignright" width="300"]Hen of the Wood Owners - Chef Eric Warnstedt & Front of the House Czar William McNeill  (Photo Cred: Denise Fitzgibbon) Hen of the Wood Owners - Chef Eric Warnstedt & Front of the House Czar William McNeill
(Photo Cred: Denise Fitzgibbon)[/caption] What is it really like to attend one of their dinners right in the farmers’ field, like they’ve hosted at Pete’s Greens, Jericho Settlers Farm and Shelburne Orchards over the last several years? Or how about their various themed events in Waterbury over the years? Or to travel with the owners and staff to New York City, Montreal, the Pacific Northwest and/or Portland, Maine and eat your way through a city in a 72 hour hedonistic binge?  We’ll give you a hint on this one – it generally involves a lot of romantic dialogue regarding pork belly. And then, the big reveal – Hen of the Wood Burlington, in all it’s glory!  We’ll take you with us as we approach their opening day.  When is that exactly?  Well, I guess you’ll have to stay tuned….]]>
Now that's farm to table! (Photo Cred: Denise Fitzgibbon)

[caption id="attachment_109030" align="alignleft" width="225"]Now that's farm to table! (Photo Cred: Denise Fitzgibbon) Now that's farm to table! (Photo Cred: Denise Fitzgibbon)[/caption] Okay, you’ve heard it all before – Hen of the Wood is opening in Burlington right next to the also new and fabulous Hotel Vermont.  Are they behind schedule for their opening?  Yup.  Will you care when you take that first bite of wood fire kissed local deliciousness?  We doubt it. So why all the hype?  Is Hen of the Wood really that good?!? You certainly don’t have to go far to find a story about how chef-owner Eric Warnstedt is the greatest thing since sliced bread.  In fact, rumor has it, he may have actually invented sliced bread… and the internet.  It also wouldn’t be hard to find many-a-glowing review of the sensational dining experience that he and partner William McNeill have cultivated with their uber-successful restaurant in Waterbury over the last 8 years. You have dined with them in Waterbury, haven’t you?  No?  Well, allow us to share what people more objective than ourselves have said: “sitting 300 miles south, in my apartment in New York, it’s difficult to think of a restaurant here in the city that can generate such feelings of satisfaction, fulfillment, culinary pleasure and near-joy as Hen of the Wood. But as I’ve implied, I’m sort of in love with the joint” – Mark Bittman, New York Times You realize the famous New York Times food critic has eaten EVERYWHERE… like, in the world.  Take his word, not ours. Well, we don’t really want to sit here and regurgitate a bunch of press and awards for you – but if you’re bored – Google that time Chef Eric was on the cover of Food & Wine Magazine as one of the top new chefs in the country; or the multiple James Beard Award Nominations; Yankee, Gourmet, Restaurant Insider and Boston Magazines all say the same thing; as does their recent Montreal Gazette review paired with yet another Seven Daysie from readers like you. What we will aim to do over the next couple weeks, is take you a little behind the scenes, should it interest you… [caption id="attachment_109033" align="alignright" width="300"]Hen of the Wood Owners - Chef Eric Warnstedt & Front of the House Czar William McNeill  (Photo Cred: Denise Fitzgibbon) Hen of the Wood Owners - Chef Eric Warnstedt & Front of the House Czar William McNeill
(Photo Cred: Denise Fitzgibbon)[/caption] What is it really like to attend one of their dinners right in the farmers’ field, like they’ve hosted at Pete’s Greens, Jericho Settlers Farm and Shelburne Orchards over the last several years? Or how about their various themed events in Waterbury over the years? Or to travel with the owners and staff to New York City, Montreal, the Pacific Northwest and/or Portland, Maine and eat your way through a city in a 72 hour hedonistic binge?  We’ll give you a hint on this one – it generally involves a lot of romantic dialogue regarding pork belly. And then, the big reveal – Hen of the Wood Burlington, in all it’s glory!  We’ll take you with us as we approach their opening day.  When is that exactly?  Well, I guess you’ll have to stay tuned….]]>
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GREEN MOUNTAIN DERBY DAMES: The Next Great Vermont Pastime https://www.localvoretoday.com/2013/09/11/green-mountain-derby-dames/ https://www.localvoretoday.com/2013/09/11/green-mountain-derby-dames/#comments Wed, 11 Sep 2013 13:00:46 +0000 https://www.localvoretoday.com/?p=98800 derby

derby-dames

By Lettie Stratton // Originally appeared in Destination Vermont Magazine and is reprinted here with permission. You may not know it, but roller derby is the fastest-growing sport in America. With over 1,300 teams in North America alone and nearly 200 international teams in the Women’s Flat Track Derby Association (WFTDA), roller derby is quickly making a name for itself as a legitimate and popular sport worldwide. So popular, even, that it’s under consideration as a sport for the 2020 Olympics. In Vermont, we’re lucky enough to have a premiere derby league right in our backyard. The Green Mountain Derby Dames are composed of an A team (Grade A Fancy), a B team (Black Ice Brawlers), and a group of referees known as the Legion of Doom. This season, they’re scheduled for 10-12 games. For some reason it took me 11 months since moving to Vermont to go watch the Derby Dames in all their glory, and now I’m kicking myself for not going sooner. Better late than never, though, so in April I went to the Champlain Valley Expo in Essex Junction to watch a doubleheader bout (a bout is the equivalent of a game in the roller derby world). This is the part where I mention that prior to watching the Dames and following up with proper research for this article, my roller derby expertise consisted of watching Drew Barrymore’s Whip It and trying (unsuccessfully) to come up with a clever derby name for myself. I may or may not have even thought at one point in time that a ball was involved in the sport. Let’s just say I was thankful upon arriving to find a cheat sheet on the inside cover of the program. “Roller Derby 101” proved to be very helpful in my quest to figure out how it all works. Here’s a crash course: Each play is called a jam. The jam starts with a whistle, sending off four blockers from each team. Another whistle sounds and the jammers (one from each team) race to be the first to break out ahead of the pack. Jammers then score points by coming back around to the back of the pack and passing members of the opposite team. Blockers try to prevent the other team’s jammer from getting by. Jams last two minutes or less and, no, there’s not a ball involved. derbyIt’s all very fast-paced and exciting. Especially when the Fancies are winning, which they were. They’re ranked 52nd in the WFTDA and it’s easy to see why. I would not want to mess with these ladies. With names like Sonic Euthanizer, Anne I Alater, and TerminateHer…who would? They’re tough, skilled, and they mean business on the track. I spoke with Kristin Welch (aka Star Slayer), co-captain of the Black Ice Brawlers, about her experience with the Derby Dames. Slayer has been skating with the Dames since March 2008 and participated in her final bout in April. She is also the former president of the Board of Directors and current director of public relations and marketing. Slayer said the first meetings that led to the start of the team were in November 2007 and the team started skating three months later. The Green Mountain Derby Dames are entirely skater-owned and operated. “Being skater-owned and operated is part of the reason that Roller Derby has spread so quickly,” Slayer said. Members pay dues each month and work different jobs for the league in order to keep things running smoothly. “Skating over six hours a week and then running a business on top of that is hard work,” she added, “but the women and men who make up our league do it all on top of full time jobs, families, and other commitments because they love it.” The fans love it, too. Enthusiastic and passionate fans of all ages filled the bleachers, folding chairs, and beer garden holding homemade signs and bobbing to the beats of local DJ, DJ Llu. The fans’ pride for their home team, and for Vermont in general, was evident. After a particularly impassioned performance of the National Anthem, sung with gusto, the father of one of the Dames took a moment to get the crowd ready for what was about to come. “I hear the opposing team [the River City Rollergirls’ Poes Punishers] came all the way from Richmond, VA,” he said. “Well I’m from Richmond, too…Richmond, VT!” The stands erupted, the announcer used his best announcing voice to get the fans riled up, and the bout was underway. Much of the Dames’ dynamism and vitality on the track must come from feeding off the energy of the crowd. Slayer said one of her favorite parts of the derby is the fans. “When I started, my favorite part was the aggressiveness of the sport and being able to show a different side of myself,” she said. “But I really fell in love with the crowd at events. Roller derby attracts a diverse, interesting, and accepting group of people.” Whether you’re a seasoned Derby expert or a newbie like me, watching the Green Mountain Derby Dames skate won’t disappoint. For more information on roller derby, check out www.wftda.com and www.flattrackstats.com. To learn more about Vermont’s hometown team, visit www.gmderbydames.com and keep an eye on their schedule for upcoming events. ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- The Derby Dames are returning to Vermont after a long summer of traveling! Away Bout: September 14 in Lyndon, VT
The Grade A Fancy vs. The Suburbia (Westchester, NY) Suburban Brawl
Away Bout: September 21 in Brattleboro, VT
The Black Ice Brawlers at the Elm City Derby Damez (Keene, NH)
Home Doubleheader: October 5 at the Champlain Valley Expo, Essex Jct., VT
4:30pm: The Black Ice Brawlers vs. The Upper Valley Vixens (Lebanon, NH)
7pm: The Grade A Fancy vs. The Assault City Assault Squad (Syracuse, NY)
Home Doubleheader: November 2 at the Champlain Valley Expo, Essex Jct., VT
4:30pm: The Black Ice Brawlers vs. The Elm City Derby Damez (Keene, NH)
7pm: The Grade A Fancy vs. The Ironbound Maidens (Garden State Roller Derby, Newark, NJ)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
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derby

derby-dames

By Lettie Stratton // Originally appeared in Destination Vermont Magazine and is reprinted here with permission. You may not know it, but roller derby is the fastest-growing sport in America. With over 1,300 teams in North America alone and nearly 200 international teams in the Women’s Flat Track Derby Association (WFTDA), roller derby is quickly making a name for itself as a legitimate and popular sport worldwide. So popular, even, that it’s under consideration as a sport for the 2020 Olympics. In Vermont, we’re lucky enough to have a premiere derby league right in our backyard. The Green Mountain Derby Dames are composed of an A team (Grade A Fancy), a B team (Black Ice Brawlers), and a group of referees known as the Legion of Doom. This season, they’re scheduled for 10-12 games. For some reason it took me 11 months since moving to Vermont to go watch the Derby Dames in all their glory, and now I’m kicking myself for not going sooner. Better late than never, though, so in April I went to the Champlain Valley Expo in Essex Junction to watch a doubleheader bout (a bout is the equivalent of a game in the roller derby world). This is the part where I mention that prior to watching the Dames and following up with proper research for this article, my roller derby expertise consisted of watching Drew Barrymore’s Whip It and trying (unsuccessfully) to come up with a clever derby name for myself. I may or may not have even thought at one point in time that a ball was involved in the sport. Let’s just say I was thankful upon arriving to find a cheat sheet on the inside cover of the program. “Roller Derby 101” proved to be very helpful in my quest to figure out how it all works. Here’s a crash course: Each play is called a jam. The jam starts with a whistle, sending off four blockers from each team. Another whistle sounds and the jammers (one from each team) race to be the first to break out ahead of the pack. Jammers then score points by coming back around to the back of the pack and passing members of the opposite team. Blockers try to prevent the other team’s jammer from getting by. Jams last two minutes or less and, no, there’s not a ball involved. derbyIt’s all very fast-paced and exciting. Especially when the Fancies are winning, which they were. They’re ranked 52nd in the WFTDA and it’s easy to see why. I would not want to mess with these ladies. With names like Sonic Euthanizer, Anne I Alater, and TerminateHer…who would? They’re tough, skilled, and they mean business on the track. I spoke with Kristin Welch (aka Star Slayer), co-captain of the Black Ice Brawlers, about her experience with the Derby Dames. Slayer has been skating with the Dames since March 2008 and participated in her final bout in April. She is also the former president of the Board of Directors and current director of public relations and marketing. Slayer said the first meetings that led to the start of the team were in November 2007 and the team started skating three months later. The Green Mountain Derby Dames are entirely skater-owned and operated. “Being skater-owned and operated is part of the reason that Roller Derby has spread so quickly,” Slayer said. Members pay dues each month and work different jobs for the league in order to keep things running smoothly. “Skating over six hours a week and then running a business on top of that is hard work,” she added, “but the women and men who make up our league do it all on top of full time jobs, families, and other commitments because they love it.” The fans love it, too. Enthusiastic and passionate fans of all ages filled the bleachers, folding chairs, and beer garden holding homemade signs and bobbing to the beats of local DJ, DJ Llu. The fans’ pride for their home team, and for Vermont in general, was evident. After a particularly impassioned performance of the National Anthem, sung with gusto, the father of one of the Dames took a moment to get the crowd ready for what was about to come. “I hear the opposing team [the River City Rollergirls’ Poes Punishers] came all the way from Richmond, VA,” he said. “Well I’m from Richmond, too…Richmond, VT!” The stands erupted, the announcer used his best announcing voice to get the fans riled up, and the bout was underway. Much of the Dames’ dynamism and vitality on the track must come from feeding off the energy of the crowd. Slayer said one of her favorite parts of the derby is the fans. “When I started, my favorite part was the aggressiveness of the sport and being able to show a different side of myself,” she said. “But I really fell in love with the crowd at events. Roller derby attracts a diverse, interesting, and accepting group of people.” Whether you’re a seasoned Derby expert or a newbie like me, watching the Green Mountain Derby Dames skate won’t disappoint. For more information on roller derby, check out www.wftda.com and www.flattrackstats.com. To learn more about Vermont’s hometown team, visit www.gmderbydames.com and keep an eye on their schedule for upcoming events. ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- The Derby Dames are returning to Vermont after a long summer of traveling! Away Bout: September 14 in Lyndon, VT
The Grade A Fancy vs. The Suburbia (Westchester, NY) Suburban Brawl
Away Bout: September 21 in Brattleboro, VT
The Black Ice Brawlers at the Elm City Derby Damez (Keene, NH)
Home Doubleheader: October 5 at the Champlain Valley Expo, Essex Jct., VT
4:30pm: The Black Ice Brawlers vs. The Upper Valley Vixens (Lebanon, NH)
7pm: The Grade A Fancy vs. The Assault City Assault Squad (Syracuse, NY)
Home Doubleheader: November 2 at the Champlain Valley Expo, Essex Jct., VT
4:30pm: The Black Ice Brawlers vs. The Elm City Derby Damez (Keene, NH)
7pm: The Grade A Fancy vs. The Ironbound Maidens (Garden State Roller Derby, Newark, NJ)
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Localvore Tonight! https://www.localvoretoday.com/2013/09/09/localvore-tonight/ https://www.localvoretoday.com/2013/09/09/localvore-tonight/#comments Mon, 09 Sep 2013 16:13:36 +0000 https://www.localvoretoday.com/?p=101504 The Skinny Pancake! EVERY Thursday, from 5:30 - 9pm, we will be sponsoring an apres-work get-together at the Skinny in Burlington. The Skinny Pancake will be running a special on a select pint of local microbrew, and we are working on some other local drink offerings. You will also be able to print a coupon through Localvore Today for 50% off a rotating weekly group munchie or special! To top off these happy hours & keep it real 'localvore', the Skinny P is booking a featured local musician or band every Thursday to start at 7pm! So come after work and hang with us! We would love to put faces to the over 10,000 people we send emails to!]]> We’re excited to announce a collaboration with our neighbors & friends, The Skinny Pancake! EVERY Thursday, from 5:30 – 9pm, we will be sponsoring an apres-work get-together at the Skinny in Burlington. The Skinny Pancake will be running a special on a select pint of local microbrew, and we are working on some other local drink offerings. You will also be able to print a coupon through Localvore Today for 50% off a rotating weekly group munchie or special! To top off these happy hours & keep it real ‘localvore’, the Skinny P is booking a featured local musician or band every Thursday to start at 7pm!

So come after work and hang with us! We would love to put faces to the over 10,000 people we send emails to!

We're excited to announce a collaboration with our neighbors & friends, The Skinny Pancake! EVERY Thursday, from 5:30 - 9pm, we will be sponsoring an apres-work get-together at the Skinny in Burlington. The Skinny Pancake will be running a special on a select pint of local microbrew, and we are working on some other local drink offerings. You will also be able to print a coupon through Localvore Today for 50% off a rotating weekly group munchie or special! To top off these happy hours & keep it real 'localvore', the Skinny P is booking a featured local musician or band every Thursday to start at 7pm! So come after work and hang with us! We would love to put faces to the over 10,000 people we send emails to!]]>
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Localvores, it’s time to ART HOP! https://www.localvoretoday.com/2013/09/06/localvores-its-time-to-art-hop/ https://www.localvoretoday.com/2013/09/06/localvores-its-time-to-art-hop/#comments Fri, 06 Sep 2013 17:45:27 +0000 https://www.localvoretoday.com/?p=100063 arthop-feature2

arthop-banner The South End Arts + Business Association's annual South End Art Hop has finally arrived! We know this event doesn't need an introduction -- you know what it's all about. This three day event spans Friday through Sunday and attracts over 30,000 visitors to Burlington's South End, the majority of whom are from out of town. Visitors mingle in artists' studios over drinks and snacks, make their own art, listen to music, admire special exhibits installed outside for the Art Hop crowd, and stay up into the wee hours of the morning enjoying good art and good company. Over 500 artists will be represented at this years' Art Hop. The event celebrates the unique characteristics of the Pine Street corridor, in particular the development of concentrated creative and artistic activity that has been established in numerous re-purposed factories and warehouses within the District. This corridor has been designated, and recognized, as the South End Arts District. Here's a quick run down of some stops along the hop we're looking forward to. Check it out, and leave us some comments! Let us know what you're really looking forward to checking out this weekend as you sit in your office and watch the minutes tick by in anticipation of your South End adventures. southendarthop FRIDAY: Art Hop 2013/Opening Party ArtsRiot is finally opening its doors -- just in time for the  Art Hop! They'll bring you free concerts all night long including ROUGH FRANCIS from 11pm-1am, and drink and food from their brand new bar and restaurant!   artisfood FRIDAY: Art is Food is Art is Food is Art is Food is Art is Food is Art  Foodies and art lovers chow down on Big Easy eats including po'boys and red beans and rice during an evening of screen printing and poetry. Meet in Maglianero parking lot! Menu- Five Courses, One Night Course 1: "Until Next Time..." Pop Up's Presents: Choice Of: French Fry Po'boys $3 Famous Red Beans and Rice $3 Course 2: Screen Printing, bring shirt, choose a design $2 Course 3: Poetry is Art too (priceless) Course 4: Drinks $2 Course 5: Lotsa Art (priceless) (Bring a Few Dollars to Throw in the Pot) comedyclub Friday: Vermont Comedy Club Presents Pop Up Comedy IMPROV SHOW: 7:00 PM STANDUP SHOW: 8:30 PM COST: FREE! FRIDAY LINEUP: 7:00 pm: Spark Improv Troupe 8:30 pm: Natalie Miller, Stephanie Manosh, David Plotkin, Natasha Druhen, Marc Bouchard, Will Betts, Kevin Byer, Josie Leavitt a-dog FRIDAY: Art for A-Dog A Silent Auction and Outdoor Galleria benefit extravaganza for our friend A-DOG to assist in his fight against Leukemia. --------------- OUTDOOR GALLERY CURATED BY JEANETTE MOURIS CONTRIBUTING ARTISTS: SAC + J.GIROUX + JON YOUNG + FATTIE B + ANDY WILLIAMS + JENNIFER KAHN + TABBATHA HENRY + NICOLE CAREY + DENNIS HEALY + JASON TOOTHACHER + ELISE PECOR + SLOAN COLLINS + STICKY BRAND + GEOFF GARROW + ALIA BRINGAS-BRAND + MICHAEL HENDRICKSON + SCOTTIE RAYMOND + SAMUEL BALLING + DAVIN ADOLPHSON + PETER VAN ETTEN + CHRIS MAYNARD + DAVID HITCHCOCK + TRINA ZIDE + SUSAN NORTON + NOAH GREER + CHARLOTTE PHILIE + CHLOE PROBST ------------------------------- NEXUS SOUND STAGE W/ DJ’S: DAKOTA // BONJOUR HI! // 2K DEEP CREW CHRIS PATTISON // DJ RUSSELL a.k.a. MASHTODON & JUSTIN R.E.M. Feat. MC T-NOONZ & LIVE MUSICAL PERFORMANCE BY: VEDORA - vedoramusic.com ---------------------------------- • PUBLIC UNVEILING AND “LIVE” FINAL PRODUCTION PHASE OF COLLABORATIVE SIX-PANEL ART WORK BY J.G. & SAC • ART OF MASSAGE BY: ALISSA FROMKIN, MASSAGE THERAPY • BEER TENT BY TRU-SPIRITS // www.truspirits.com • PHOTO BOOTH VIA JEREMIAH @ BVT PHOTOGRAPHY • MULTI-COLOR OUTDOOR LASER SHOW & MORE! evolution FRIDAY: Evolution This year, the Art Hop corresponds with the seventh birthday of our good friends and Merchant Partners over at Evolution Physical Therapy & Yoga! They celebrate each year with music, art, a studio full of people, and of course yoga! Throughout this weekend they will also have a community art project, free chocolates from Creators Way Confections, and raw wraps and noodle bowls! Here’s our lineup for this year: Friday, Sept 6th 6p-10 Henna Artist opens – Rebecca with Heart Fire Henna – www.heartfirehenna.com 7p-10 “Photo shoot” opens – Jenn with Wild Clover Photography – www.wildcloverphotography.com 7:30p-8:30 Music-New Nile Orchestra 9p-10 Music-New Nile Orchestra LED Hooping Acro Yoga Saturday, Sept 7th 12:30p-1 Kids Yoga with Becky 1p-4 Face Painting with Liz of Stars and Other Dust Face Painting 1p-1:30 Design your own hoop, available for $5 purchase at the event with Nicole – www.hoopingwithnicole.com 2p-2:30 Kids Hoop with Nicole 2:30p-3 Free Flow Hooping (open to anyone) 4p-10 Make Your Own Mat Spray (while supplies last) 4p-10 Make a Prayer Flag (while supplies last) 6p-10 Henna Artist Opens – Heartfire Henna 7:30p-8:30 Music – The Move It, Move It! 7p-10 “Photo shoot” opens – Jenn with Wild Clover 8:30p-9 – The Cranky Show 9p-10 Music – The Move It, Move It! LED Hooping south-end-signsFRIDAY/SATURDAY/SUNDAY: RU12? Your friendly local LGBTQ community center just relocated to the South End and they're getting in the spirit! Stop by their new rainbow-painted pad and check out great art by local LGBTQA artists! Artists featured at RU12?: Megan Moerdyke - Jewelry/ Metal Alyx Lyons - Photography Milton Rosa-Ortiz - Multimedia 3-dimensional Sue Wilson - Glass Asher Sullivan- Drawing Brian Loring - Painting Eva Bessette- Fiber Arts Gavin Rouille - Silkscreen wellness FRIDAY: Wellness Collective After a very successful fundraiser and several weeks of preparation, The Wellness Collective is excited to finally open their doors and show their friends, family and community supporters what they've built! Help them celebrate! They'll be serving up some healthy refreshments & good music and hosting photographer Kelly O'Neal and her amazing artwork. Check out www.ekovisions.com for a sneak preview of what she has in store! ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ Here's a quick glance at some other stops on the Art Hop we're excited about: Functional Glass ProjectSouth End Glass at Davis Studio, 4 Howard Street Work with beautiful cut glass to create a unique and functional fused glass project. Glass DemonstrationsAO Glass Works, 416 Pine Street Drop in for glass demonstrations during all of art hop. A Community Art ProjectBarge Canal Market, 377 Pine Street Barge Canal Market has large ceilings and blank walls. We want your help! We would like to fill these walls with a project made by all of you. There will be large blank panels and multiple art mediums located in front of the store. Come let your creativity flow and leave your mark. After Art Hop come and check out the final project hanging on our walls. Reference for RadicalsVolunteers for Peace, 7 Kilburn Street Suite 316 The Reference for Radicals project is a partnership between the Peace & Justice Center, independent activists, and local artists. The twelve collaborating artists use their various mediums to tell the story of a Radical idea or word that is closest to their hearts. The art pieces created for this project are expressions of the personal stories, beliefs, and ideas of the artists. Print Making Workshop by IskraIskra/Karma Bird House/The JDK Gallery, 47 Maple Street Screens, paper, ink and group instruction will be on going through out the weekend. Make sure you check out the SEABA website for a complete, updated list of Art Hop events this weekend!]]>
arthop-feature2

arthop-banner The South End Arts + Business Association's annual South End Art Hop has finally arrived! We know this event doesn't need an introduction -- you know what it's all about. This three day event spans Friday through Sunday and attracts over 30,000 visitors to Burlington's South End, the majority of whom are from out of town. Visitors mingle in artists' studios over drinks and snacks, make their own art, listen to music, admire special exhibits installed outside for the Art Hop crowd, and stay up into the wee hours of the morning enjoying good art and good company. Over 500 artists will be represented at this years' Art Hop. The event celebrates the unique characteristics of the Pine Street corridor, in particular the development of concentrated creative and artistic activity that has been established in numerous re-purposed factories and warehouses within the District. This corridor has been designated, and recognized, as the South End Arts District. Here's a quick run down of some stops along the hop we're looking forward to. Check it out, and leave us some comments! Let us know what you're really looking forward to checking out this weekend as you sit in your office and watch the minutes tick by in anticipation of your South End adventures. southendarthop FRIDAY: Art Hop 2013/Opening Party ArtsRiot is finally opening its doors -- just in time for the  Art Hop! They'll bring you free concerts all night long including ROUGH FRANCIS from 11pm-1am, and drink and food from their brand new bar and restaurant!   artisfood FRIDAY: Art is Food is Art is Food is Art is Food is Art is Food is Art  Foodies and art lovers chow down on Big Easy eats including po'boys and red beans and rice during an evening of screen printing and poetry. Meet in Maglianero parking lot! Menu- Five Courses, One Night Course 1: "Until Next Time..." Pop Up's Presents: Choice Of: French Fry Po'boys $3 Famous Red Beans and Rice $3 Course 2: Screen Printing, bring shirt, choose a design $2 Course 3: Poetry is Art too (priceless) Course 4: Drinks $2 Course 5: Lotsa Art (priceless) (Bring a Few Dollars to Throw in the Pot) comedyclub Friday: Vermont Comedy Club Presents Pop Up Comedy IMPROV SHOW: 7:00 PM STANDUP SHOW: 8:30 PM COST: FREE! FRIDAY LINEUP: 7:00 pm: Spark Improv Troupe 8:30 pm: Natalie Miller, Stephanie Manosh, David Plotkin, Natasha Druhen, Marc Bouchard, Will Betts, Kevin Byer, Josie Leavitt a-dog FRIDAY: Art for A-Dog A Silent Auction and Outdoor Galleria benefit extravaganza for our friend A-DOG to assist in his fight against Leukemia. --------------- OUTDOOR GALLERY CURATED BY JEANETTE MOURIS CONTRIBUTING ARTISTS: SAC + J.GIROUX + JON YOUNG + FATTIE B + ANDY WILLIAMS + JENNIFER KAHN + TABBATHA HENRY + NICOLE CAREY + DENNIS HEALY + JASON TOOTHACHER + ELISE PECOR + SLOAN COLLINS + STICKY BRAND + GEOFF GARROW + ALIA BRINGAS-BRAND + MICHAEL HENDRICKSON + SCOTTIE RAYMOND + SAMUEL BALLING + DAVIN ADOLPHSON + PETER VAN ETTEN + CHRIS MAYNARD + DAVID HITCHCOCK + TRINA ZIDE + SUSAN NORTON + NOAH GREER + CHARLOTTE PHILIE + CHLOE PROBST ------------------------------- NEXUS SOUND STAGE W/ DJ’S: DAKOTA // BONJOUR HI! // 2K DEEP CREW CHRIS PATTISON // DJ RUSSELL a.k.a. MASHTODON & JUSTIN R.E.M. Feat. MC T-NOONZ & LIVE MUSICAL PERFORMANCE BY: VEDORA - vedoramusic.com ---------------------------------- • PUBLIC UNVEILING AND “LIVE” FINAL PRODUCTION PHASE OF COLLABORATIVE SIX-PANEL ART WORK BY J.G. & SAC • ART OF MASSAGE BY: ALISSA FROMKIN, MASSAGE THERAPY • BEER TENT BY TRU-SPIRITS // www.truspirits.com • PHOTO BOOTH VIA JEREMIAH @ BVT PHOTOGRAPHY • MULTI-COLOR OUTDOOR LASER SHOW & MORE! evolution FRIDAY: Evolution This year, the Art Hop corresponds with the seventh birthday of our good friends and Merchant Partners over at Evolution Physical Therapy & Yoga! They celebrate each year with music, art, a studio full of people, and of course yoga! Throughout this weekend they will also have a community art project, free chocolates from Creators Way Confections, and raw wraps and noodle bowls! Here’s our lineup for this year: Friday, Sept 6th 6p-10 Henna Artist opens – Rebecca with Heart Fire Henna – www.heartfirehenna.com 7p-10 “Photo shoot” opens – Jenn with Wild Clover Photography – www.wildcloverphotography.com 7:30p-8:30 Music-New Nile Orchestra 9p-10 Music-New Nile Orchestra LED Hooping Acro Yoga Saturday, Sept 7th 12:30p-1 Kids Yoga with Becky 1p-4 Face Painting with Liz of Stars and Other Dust Face Painting 1p-1:30 Design your own hoop, available for $5 purchase at the event with Nicole – www.hoopingwithnicole.com 2p-2:30 Kids Hoop with Nicole 2:30p-3 Free Flow Hooping (open to anyone) 4p-10 Make Your Own Mat Spray (while supplies last) 4p-10 Make a Prayer Flag (while supplies last) 6p-10 Henna Artist Opens – Heartfire Henna 7:30p-8:30 Music – The Move It, Move It! 7p-10 “Photo shoot” opens – Jenn with Wild Clover 8:30p-9 – The Cranky Show 9p-10 Music – The Move It, Move It! LED Hooping south-end-signsFRIDAY/SATURDAY/SUNDAY: RU12? Your friendly local LGBTQ community center just relocated to the South End and they're getting in the spirit! Stop by their new rainbow-painted pad and check out great art by local LGBTQA artists! Artists featured at RU12?: Megan Moerdyke - Jewelry/ Metal Alyx Lyons - Photography Milton Rosa-Ortiz - Multimedia 3-dimensional Sue Wilson - Glass Asher Sullivan- Drawing Brian Loring - Painting Eva Bessette- Fiber Arts Gavin Rouille - Silkscreen wellness FRIDAY: Wellness Collective After a very successful fundraiser and several weeks of preparation, The Wellness Collective is excited to finally open their doors and show their friends, family and community supporters what they've built! Help them celebrate! They'll be serving up some healthy refreshments & good music and hosting photographer Kelly O'Neal and her amazing artwork. Check out www.ekovisions.com for a sneak preview of what she has in store! ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ Here's a quick glance at some other stops on the Art Hop we're excited about: Functional Glass ProjectSouth End Glass at Davis Studio, 4 Howard Street Work with beautiful cut glass to create a unique and functional fused glass project. Glass DemonstrationsAO Glass Works, 416 Pine Street Drop in for glass demonstrations during all of art hop. A Community Art ProjectBarge Canal Market, 377 Pine Street Barge Canal Market has large ceilings and blank walls. We want your help! We would like to fill these walls with a project made by all of you. There will be large blank panels and multiple art mediums located in front of the store. Come let your creativity flow and leave your mark. After Art Hop come and check out the final project hanging on our walls. Reference for RadicalsVolunteers for Peace, 7 Kilburn Street Suite 316 The Reference for Radicals project is a partnership between the Peace & Justice Center, independent activists, and local artists. The twelve collaborating artists use their various mediums to tell the story of a Radical idea or word that is closest to their hearts. The art pieces created for this project are expressions of the personal stories, beliefs, and ideas of the artists. Print Making Workshop by IskraIskra/Karma Bird House/The JDK Gallery, 47 Maple Street Screens, paper, ink and group instruction will be on going through out the weekend. Make sure you check out the SEABA website for a complete, updated list of Art Hop events this weekend!]]>
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Guild Fine Meats opens in Burlington https://www.localvoretoday.com/2013/08/22/guild-fine-meats-opens-in-burlington/ https://www.localvoretoday.com/2013/08/22/guild-fine-meats-opens-in-burlington/#comments Thu, 22 Aug 2013 13:47:39 +0000 https://www.localvoretoday.com/?p=96508 guild-fine-meats The Farmhouse Group is doing it again by bringing Burlington and all of its guests Guild Fine Meats. Dry aged steaks, charcuterie, porchetta, and other house prepared meats... take some time soon and get to know the new butcher in town, just like I did Wednesday evening on my way home from the Localvore HQ. Not only was my Laplatte River Roast Beef sandwich with horseradish aioli, lettuce, tomato, and arugula delicious, but I knew exactly where it came from. I ordered mine cold to-go after another busy day, and found an ice cold six pack of Oakshire IPA from Oregon to cool me down in the summer evening heat. The roast beef was very tender, thinly sliced to my liking, and an exceptional addition to the local flavors that make living in Vermont tasty. You can build your own sandwich or choose from their menu of specialty sandwiches. The butchered meats and deli counter is a great find especially while grilling season is still in session. The craft beer selection is very unique and is the last ingredient you need to make this a one stop shop for a great meal. Situated right on the corner of College St. and St. Paul you'll find a new gem to order all your fine meats...  "All made right here from local ingredients." There is a nice vibe to the whole place and the prices are extremely reasonable, so take my word for it. Visit Guild Fine Meats in downtown Burlington next time you need a meal.

Fine Meat Lover and CEO at Localvore, Inc.,

Dan White

 ]]>
guild-fine-meats

The Farmhouse Group is doing it again by bringing Burlington and all of its guests Guild Fine Meats. Dry aged steaks, charcuterie, porchetta, and other house prepared meats… take some time soon and get to know the new butcher in town, just like I did Wednesday evening on my way home from the Localvore HQ.

Not only was my Laplatte River Roast Beef sandwich with horseradish aioli, lettuce, tomato, and arugula delicious, but I knew exactly where it came from. I ordered mine cold to-go after another busy day, and found an ice cold six pack of Oakshire IPA from Oregon to cool me down in the summer evening heat. The roast beef was very tender, thinly sliced to my liking, and an exceptional addition to the local flavors that make living in Vermont tasty.

You can build your own sandwich or choose from their menu of specialty sandwiches. The butchered meats and deli counter is a great find especially while grilling season is still in session. The craft beer selection is very unique and is the last ingredient you need to make this a one stop shop for a great meal.

Situated right on the corner of College St. and St. Paul you’ll find a new gem to order all your fine meats…  “All made right here from local ingredients.”

There is a nice vibe to the whole place and the prices are extremely reasonable, so take my word for it. Visit Guild Fine Meats in downtown Burlington next time you need a meal.

Fine Meat Lover and CEO at Localvore, Inc.,

Dan White

 

guild-fine-meats The Farmhouse Group is doing it again by bringing Burlington and all of its guests Guild Fine Meats. Dry aged steaks, charcuterie, porchetta, and other house prepared meats... take some time soon and get to know the new butcher in town, just like I did Wednesday evening on my way home from the Localvore HQ. Not only was my Laplatte River Roast Beef sandwich with horseradish aioli, lettuce, tomato, and arugula delicious, but I knew exactly where it came from. I ordered mine cold to-go after another busy day, and found an ice cold six pack of Oakshire IPA from Oregon to cool me down in the summer evening heat. The roast beef was very tender, thinly sliced to my liking, and an exceptional addition to the local flavors that make living in Vermont tasty. You can build your own sandwich or choose from their menu of specialty sandwiches. The butchered meats and deli counter is a great find especially while grilling season is still in session. The craft beer selection is very unique and is the last ingredient you need to make this a one stop shop for a great meal. Situated right on the corner of College St. and St. Paul you'll find a new gem to order all your fine meats...  "All made right here from local ingredients." There is a nice vibe to the whole place and the prices are extremely reasonable, so take my word for it. Visit Guild Fine Meats in downtown Burlington next time you need a meal.

Fine Meat Lover and CEO at Localvore, Inc.,

Dan White

 ]]>
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Localvore Referral Program: Earn $5 in Your Localvore Account https://www.localvoretoday.com/2013/06/27/localvore-referral-program-earn-5-in-your-localvore-account/ https://www.localvoretoday.com/2013/06/27/localvore-referral-program-earn-5-in-your-localvore-account/#comments Thu, 27 Jun 2013 14:32:02 +0000 https://www.localvoretoday.com/?p=71577 3for5_banner2 We're doing something a little different today, and we hope you'll get as excited about it as we are. Here's the thing: we are quickly approaching our first birthday, and we want to sprint to that date, and cross that milestone with our fists in the air. We take great pride in what we have built in this first year, especially when it comes to the faithfulness, engagement level, and value of our customer base. We are only as strong and successful as our subscribers. With that in mind, we're asking you to help us grow. We want more subscribers just like you. So we figured you're the best person to ask: help us find them. We're confident that your friends will love us just as much as you do, and the feeling will be mutual. So here's how we're going to do this: we're launching the 3 for 5 referral program. All you have to do is fill out our online form by finding 3 friends in your email contacts who aren't already Localvore Today subscribers (don't worry, our form will let you know if they're already on our list), and convince them to sign up. Once all three of your friends sign up, you'll be notified via email, and you'll be rewarded with $5 in your Localvore account -- a small 'thank you' to show our appreciation. Go forth and multiply! [Click here to participate in the 3 for 5 campaign]]]> 3for5_banner2

We’re doing something a little different today, and we hope you’ll get as excited about it as we are.

Here’s the thing: we are quickly approaching our first birthday, and we want to sprint to that date, and cross that milestone with our fists in the air.

We take great pride in what we have built in this first year, especially when it comes to the faithfulness, engagement level, and value of our customer base. We are only as strong and successful as our subscribers.

With that in mind, we’re asking you to help us grow.

We want more subscribers just like you. So we figured you’re the best person to ask: help us find them. We’re confident that your friends will love us just as much as you do, and the feeling will be mutual.

So here’s how we’re going to do this: we’re launching the 3 for 5 referral program. All you have to do is fill out our online form by finding 3 friends in your email contacts who aren’t already Localvore Today subscribers (don’t worry, our form will let you know if they’re already on our list), and convince them to sign up.

Once all three of your friends sign up, you’ll be notified via email, and you’ll be rewarded with $5 in your Localvore account — a small ‘thank you’ to show our appreciation.

Go forth and multiply!

[Click here to participate in the 3 for 5 campaign]

3for5_banner2 We're doing something a little different today, and we hope you'll get as excited about it as we are. Here's the thing: we are quickly approaching our first birthday, and we want to sprint to that date, and cross that milestone with our fists in the air. We take great pride in what we have built in this first year, especially when it comes to the faithfulness, engagement level, and value of our customer base. We are only as strong and successful as our subscribers. With that in mind, we're asking you to help us grow. We want more subscribers just like you. So we figured you're the best person to ask: help us find them. We're confident that your friends will love us just as much as you do, and the feeling will be mutual. So here's how we're going to do this: we're launching the 3 for 5 referral program. All you have to do is fill out our online form by finding 3 friends in your email contacts who aren't already Localvore Today subscribers (don't worry, our form will let you know if they're already on our list), and convince them to sign up. Once all three of your friends sign up, you'll be notified via email, and you'll be rewarded with $5 in your Localvore account -- a small 'thank you' to show our appreciation. Go forth and multiply! [Click here to participate in the 3 for 5 campaign]]]>
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Natural Body Care for Localvores: Why it Really Matters & What You Need to Know https://www.localvoretoday.com/2013/06/24/natural-body-care-for-localvores-why-it-really-matters/ https://www.localvoretoday.com/2013/06/24/natural-body-care-for-localvores-why-it-really-matters/#comments Mon, 24 Jun 2013 15:42:36 +0000 https://www.localvoretoday.com/?p=69693 natural-products

natural-productsWe can all understand why it's important to eat foods that are certified organic; no one wants to drink antibiotics with their milk or chow down on pesticides along with their cheese burger.  But what's all the fuss over natural body care?  Does it really make that much of a difference if my body lotion is made with natural fragrances or which ingredients my toothpaste uses to clean my teeth? YES! Your skin is the largest organ in your body and, being semi-permeable, it is meant to absorb nutrients and other substances directly into your bloodstream and tissue. So, each and every one of the ingredients you lather, dab and spray onto your skin finds its way into you body and often settles into tissue and fat cells indefinitely.  Many of those ingredients include parabens, sulfates, synthetic fragrances, petrochemicals and even known carcinogens. Many of these ingredients are known to be toxic to the reproductive system and to negatively impact the endocrine system--the system responsible for producing, storing and secreting hormones that carry out essential body functions. labMost of us mistakenly assume  that body care products are regulated, in some way, by someone, to ensure their safety. But they aren't! According to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), the "FDA does not approve cosmetics, although [they] do approve color additives used in cosmetics" (FDA 2012).  Instead, with the exception of certain color additives, the FDA leaves the sole responsibility of cosmetic safety…AND consumer health… up to the manufacturers themselves!  With no regulation and no policing, this means that manufacturers are pretty much free to include any ingredient they want into the products we buy and use everyday, toxic or not. But my shampoo says "organic," and my moisturizer says its "pure," right there on the bottle! They can't just say 'natural,' 'organic' and 'pure' without actually being  natural, organic and pure…can they?   Unfortunately, as the video,  The Story of Cosmetics, by The Story of Stuff Project, points out, "On cosmetics labels, words like 'herbal,' 'natural,' even 'organic' have no legal definition. That means that anybody can put anything in a bottle and call it 'natural.' And they do!" When it comes to cosmetics, 'natural' is simply a marketing term and in no way indicates that the product is any less harmful to you or the environment than any other product. If the FDA isn't looking out for consumer safety, then who is?  Luckily, there are resources on line to help.  Several organizations are woking hard to protect consumer health by informing consumers and changing legislation.  These are two that are very user friendly and offer loads of information:
  • The Environmental Working Group: EWG's Skin Deep website is a fantastic consumer resource. They have compiled an electronic database of ingredient labels for body care products and cross-linked them with databases that describe chemical toxicity.  You can go to their website and type in your favorite products to see their safety rating.  You can also use the site to tips and recommendations for finding the beauty products that will actually help you look, feel and smell beautiful without poisoning you at the same time!
  • The Campaign for Safe Cosmetics: The Campaign for Safe Cosmetics is a coalition effort (of which EWG is a founding member) launched in 2004 to protect the health of consumers and workers by securing reforms needed to eliminate dangerous chemicals from personal care products.
The best way to get toxic ingredients off our shelves, out of our products and out of our bodies, is to stop buying them!  Instead, use your buying power to change the market and choose to support companies who are dedicated to creating beauty products with only the highest quality and safest ingredients possible.  Read labels, check out the safety of unknown ingredients online, and let your local retailer know that you want them to stock the healthiest products available.  In the end, you will look better and feel better inside and out! --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- P.S. We're currently offering a voucher for Flourish Natural Body Care on LocalvoreToday.com! All Flourish products are crafted in Vermont and made in small batches using wholesome, natural, raw ingredients--no fillers--no harmful ingredients, ever! Flourish Natural Body Care mixes premium ingredients with intoxicating essential oils to create a full line of incredible hair and body care products including: shampoos, conditioners, sugar body polishes, shea butter balms, body cremes, lotions and lip balms! With this offer pay $25 and get $50 to spend at their online store.

flourish

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- References: FDA 2012. Cosmetics Q&A: Prohibited Ingredients. Food and Drug Administration. http://www.fda.gov/Cosmetics/ResourcesForYou/Consumers/CosmeticsQA/ucm167234.htm  ]]>
natural-products

natural-productsWe can all understand why it's important to eat foods that are certified organic; no one wants to drink antibiotics with their milk or chow down on pesticides along with their cheese burger.  But what's all the fuss over natural body care?  Does it really make that much of a difference if my body lotion is made with natural fragrances or which ingredients my toothpaste uses to clean my teeth? YES! Your skin is the largest organ in your body and, being semi-permeable, it is meant to absorb nutrients and other substances directly into your bloodstream and tissue. So, each and every one of the ingredients you lather, dab and spray onto your skin finds its way into you body and often settles into tissue and fat cells indefinitely.  Many of those ingredients include parabens, sulfates, synthetic fragrances, petrochemicals and even known carcinogens. Many of these ingredients are known to be toxic to the reproductive system and to negatively impact the endocrine system--the system responsible for producing, storing and secreting hormones that carry out essential body functions. labMost of us mistakenly assume  that body care products are regulated, in some way, by someone, to ensure their safety. But they aren't! According to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), the "FDA does not approve cosmetics, although [they] do approve color additives used in cosmetics" (FDA 2012).  Instead, with the exception of certain color additives, the FDA leaves the sole responsibility of cosmetic safety…AND consumer health… up to the manufacturers themselves!  With no regulation and no policing, this means that manufacturers are pretty much free to include any ingredient they want into the products we buy and use everyday, toxic or not. But my shampoo says "organic," and my moisturizer says its "pure," right there on the bottle! They can't just say 'natural,' 'organic' and 'pure' without actually being  natural, organic and pure…can they?   Unfortunately, as the video,  The Story of Cosmetics, by The Story of Stuff Project, points out, "On cosmetics labels, words like 'herbal,' 'natural,' even 'organic' have no legal definition. That means that anybody can put anything in a bottle and call it 'natural.' And they do!" When it comes to cosmetics, 'natural' is simply a marketing term and in no way indicates that the product is any less harmful to you or the environment than any other product. If the FDA isn't looking out for consumer safety, then who is?  Luckily, there are resources on line to help.  Several organizations are woking hard to protect consumer health by informing consumers and changing legislation.  These are two that are very user friendly and offer loads of information:
  • The Environmental Working Group: EWG's Skin Deep website is a fantastic consumer resource. They have compiled an electronic database of ingredient labels for body care products and cross-linked them with databases that describe chemical toxicity.  You can go to their website and type in your favorite products to see their safety rating.  You can also use the site to tips and recommendations for finding the beauty products that will actually help you look, feel and smell beautiful without poisoning you at the same time!
  • The Campaign for Safe Cosmetics: The Campaign for Safe Cosmetics is a coalition effort (of which EWG is a founding member) launched in 2004 to protect the health of consumers and workers by securing reforms needed to eliminate dangerous chemicals from personal care products.
The best way to get toxic ingredients off our shelves, out of our products and out of our bodies, is to stop buying them!  Instead, use your buying power to change the market and choose to support companies who are dedicated to creating beauty products with only the highest quality and safest ingredients possible.  Read labels, check out the safety of unknown ingredients online, and let your local retailer know that you want them to stock the healthiest products available.  In the end, you will look better and feel better inside and out! --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- P.S. We're currently offering a voucher for Flourish Natural Body Care on LocalvoreToday.com! All Flourish products are crafted in Vermont and made in small batches using wholesome, natural, raw ingredients--no fillers--no harmful ingredients, ever! Flourish Natural Body Care mixes premium ingredients with intoxicating essential oils to create a full line of incredible hair and body care products including: shampoos, conditioners, sugar body polishes, shea butter balms, body cremes, lotions and lip balms! With this offer pay $25 and get $50 to spend at their online store.

flourish

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- References: FDA 2012. Cosmetics Q&A: Prohibited Ingredients. Food and Drug Administration. http://www.fda.gov/Cosmetics/ResourcesForYou/Consumers/CosmeticsQA/ucm167234.htm  ]]>
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Wood Finishing 101 From the Experts at Sam’s Wood Furniture https://www.localvoretoday.com/2013/06/17/wood-finishing-101-from-the-experts-at-sams-wood-furniture/ https://www.localvoretoday.com/2013/06/17/wood-finishing-101-from-the-experts-at-sams-wood-furniture/#comments Mon, 17 Jun 2013 16:34:20 +0000 https://www.localvoretoday.com/?p=66161 SAMS2

Purchasing unfinished wood furniture is a great way to acquire high quality solid pieces  while saving money AND customizing them to match your unique style. But are you daunted by the idea of taking on yet another DIY project?  Never fear!  Sam's wood Furniture has put together the following tips to make hand finishing your own furniture with EF (earth friendly) finishes a fun and easy experience that gives you the results you want! [caption id="attachment_68083" align="alignright" width="307"]finished Solid Alder chest of drawers - built in the USA and finished by Sam's finishing team! Way to go, Patrick and Aaron![/caption] Surface Preparation: All surfaces should be clean and free from all dirt and oils. Sand surface using fine grit sandpaper such as #180-#220. Water base finishes need a smoother surface than oil base finishes. Do not use tack cloths when using water based finish. Tack cloths contain oil and will contaminate the surface. On certain woods such as oak and ash, pre-wet the wood with a damp cloth to raise the grain before final sanding. Allow the dampened wood to dry 30 minutes before the final sanding. This will provide a smoother final finish. Temperature and Humidity: Water base finishes must be applied at temperatures above 65 F. Cooler temperatures will adversely affect how the finish will level and harden, causing fish-eyes or craters. If it is cold enough to wear a sweater it is too cold to apply a water base finish. The surface of the wood must also be warm. If you turn the heat on when you enter your shop in the morning, the air heats up quickly but your furniture will still be cold for some time. Check the surface to see if it is warm. Also, check the temperature of the finish. Warming cold finish by setting the can next to a heater or setting the container in some hot water for 5 minutes will improve the ease of application.In hot temperatures (85F – 100F) the finish may dry too fast. Use EF Extender to open (increase) the dry time. Finishes that dry too fast may not completely level out before all the water evaporates from the finish. This can result in a poor appearance.High humidity can cause the finishes to take longer to dry but will not harm the final finish. Maintenance and careWater base finishes take 7 days before they are ready for daily use. To maintain the finish clean surface with a damp washcloth and wipe dry. Cleaners such as Pledge and Murphy’s Oil Soap are not recommended because they leave a dull residue on the finish. Polishes such as lemon oil or orange oil work well for routine maintenance. Restoring an Old Surface: Top coats may be re-coated at any time in the future. Simply wipe down the surface with mineral spirits to remove any grease or dirt, lightly sand with #320 or finer, and then apply another coat.Tinting Stains: Tinting may be accomplished by adding 10 to 20% EF Stain to an EF Top Coat. Thanks to the folks at Sam's Wood Furniture for letting us pass along these helpful tips!]]>
SAMS2

Purchasing unfinished wood furniture is a great way to acquire high quality solid pieces  while saving money AND customizing them to match your unique style. But are you daunted by the idea of taking on yet another DIY project?  Never fear!  Sam's wood Furniture has put together the following tips to make hand finishing your own furniture with EF (earth friendly) finishes a fun and easy experience that gives you the results you want! [caption id="attachment_68083" align="alignright" width="307"]finished Solid Alder chest of drawers - built in the USA and finished by Sam's finishing team! Way to go, Patrick and Aaron![/caption] Surface Preparation: All surfaces should be clean and free from all dirt and oils. Sand surface using fine grit sandpaper such as #180-#220. Water base finishes need a smoother surface than oil base finishes. Do not use tack cloths when using water based finish. Tack cloths contain oil and will contaminate the surface. On certain woods such as oak and ash, pre-wet the wood with a damp cloth to raise the grain before final sanding. Allow the dampened wood to dry 30 minutes before the final sanding. This will provide a smoother final finish. Temperature and Humidity: Water base finishes must be applied at temperatures above 65 F. Cooler temperatures will adversely affect how the finish will level and harden, causing fish-eyes or craters. If it is cold enough to wear a sweater it is too cold to apply a water base finish. The surface of the wood must also be warm. If you turn the heat on when you enter your shop in the morning, the air heats up quickly but your furniture will still be cold for some time. Check the surface to see if it is warm. Also, check the temperature of the finish. Warming cold finish by setting the can next to a heater or setting the container in some hot water for 5 minutes will improve the ease of application.In hot temperatures (85F – 100F) the finish may dry too fast. Use EF Extender to open (increase) the dry time. Finishes that dry too fast may not completely level out before all the water evaporates from the finish. This can result in a poor appearance.High humidity can cause the finishes to take longer to dry but will not harm the final finish. Maintenance and careWater base finishes take 7 days before they are ready for daily use. To maintain the finish clean surface with a damp washcloth and wipe dry. Cleaners such as Pledge and Murphy’s Oil Soap are not recommended because they leave a dull residue on the finish. Polishes such as lemon oil or orange oil work well for routine maintenance. Restoring an Old Surface: Top coats may be re-coated at any time in the future. Simply wipe down the surface with mineral spirits to remove any grease or dirt, lightly sand with #320 or finer, and then apply another coat.Tinting Stains: Tinting may be accomplished by adding 10 to 20% EF Stain to an EF Top Coat. Thanks to the folks at Sam's Wood Furniture for letting us pass along these helpful tips!]]>
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3 Easy Steps to Get Your Bike Farm Tour Ready! https://www.localvoretoday.com/2013/06/12/3-easy-steps-to-get-your-bike-farm-tour-ready/ https://www.localvoretoday.com/2013/06/12/3-easy-steps-to-get-your-bike-farm-tour-ready/#comments Wed, 12 Jun 2013 17:41:53 +0000 https://www.localvoretoday.com/?p=65667 biketour

The beauty of the bicycle is that it really IS a very basic machine, especially when compared to a modern car, and one that give loads of pleasure and freedom all while being a functional form of transportation. Luckily, this translates into the rider having to do only a few simple things to get her bike ready for the season.  Yet, as quick and easy as they are, if you DON'T take the time to show your bike some TLC before you head out on the ride, it may not give you any love back; and you could find yourself spending more time frustrated on the side of the road than cruising happily upon it.  So take a few moments to follow these simple steps and get ready to head out on the roads!
  1. biketour If you're like me, the first step toward getting your bike ready to ride for the season, is finding a way to pull it out from the very farthest, darkest and dustiest back corner of your garage.  Well, scooch over the snowblowers and grab your bike pump on your way back to daylight. Next, give your tires a squeeze. If your tires are soft, pump them up to the suggested maximum pressure shown on the sidewall of the tire (this will be a number followed by the acronym PSI, which stands for --pounds per square inch). Bicycle tires are like helium balloons in that they tend to lose pressure over time. Proper tire inflation will increase your comfort by letting your tires act as shock absorbers, make your tires less prone to punctures by better protecting your inner tubes, and improves safety by keeping just the right amount of rubber between you and the road you cruise over. 
  2. Next, test your brakes.  Obviously, the stopping power of your breaks is one of the most important safety features on your bike.  So take a moment to make sure they work!  One of the best ways to check your breaks is to mount your bike and lean all of your weight on your handle bars while applying the front break. Push forward with your legs. You should be able to put all your weight on the handlebars without the front wheel moving.  You can test your rear break the same way but with applying your weight to the saddle instead of the handlebars.   If your breaks don't feel solid, don't take a chance. Take your bike into the shop to be checked out.
  3. Lastly, clean and oil your chain.  Simply flip your bike upside down so the wheels are in the air and it is resting on the saddle and handlebars (you might want to place it on an old towel or blanket to prevent scratches or scuff marks).  This will allow the wheels, and hence chain, to move freely while you turn the crankset (pedals).  Take a rag in the palm of your hand and wrap it around the chain. Hold the chain semi-tightly while you turn the cranks a couple times. You very well may see your chain getting cleaner before your eyes as you wipe away all of last year's gunk. Once your chain is relatively clean, add no more than one drop of oil to each link. The oil on your chain protects your chain from dirt and rust and aids in proper smooth shifting. But be careful not to apply too much oil!  An overly oiled chain actually attracts dirt and makes shifting less smooth. After the oil drops have had a moment to settle, take another rag and give the crank another turn, this time, letting the chain lightly run through the rag to wipe off any excess oil.  
Just like you would with a car, if you've put in some pretty decent mileage the previous year, take it in to a bike shop and ask the staff if the bike needs a tune up. They will tighten up any loose cables, check your headset and your break pads, and make sure everything is running as smoothly and safely as it should be.  We are lucky here in Burlington; local shops will give free and honest evaluations. Keep in mind, there are some bike components that do wear and need to be replaced from time to time such as chains, brake pads, and cassette (the gears on the rear wheel) just as brake pads and motor oil are regularly changed in your car. 
 
But with only a few minutes of your time, you AND your bike will have a fantastic summer of riding!
 
Be safe and have fun!
]]>
biketour

The beauty of the bicycle is that it really IS a very basic machine, especially when compared to a modern car, and one that give loads of pleasure and freedom all while being a functional form of transportation. Luckily, this translates into the rider having to do only a few simple things to get her bike ready for the season.  Yet, as quick and easy as they are, if you DON'T take the time to show your bike some TLC before you head out on the ride, it may not give you any love back; and you could find yourself spending more time frustrated on the side of the road than cruising happily upon it.  So take a few moments to follow these simple steps and get ready to head out on the roads!
  1. biketour If you're like me, the first step toward getting your bike ready to ride for the season, is finding a way to pull it out from the very farthest, darkest and dustiest back corner of your garage.  Well, scooch over the snowblowers and grab your bike pump on your way back to daylight. Next, give your tires a squeeze. If your tires are soft, pump them up to the suggested maximum pressure shown on the sidewall of the tire (this will be a number followed by the acronym PSI, which stands for --pounds per square inch). Bicycle tires are like helium balloons in that they tend to lose pressure over time. Proper tire inflation will increase your comfort by letting your tires act as shock absorbers, make your tires less prone to punctures by better protecting your inner tubes, and improves safety by keeping just the right amount of rubber between you and the road you cruise over. 
  2. Next, test your brakes.  Obviously, the stopping power of your breaks is one of the most important safety features on your bike.  So take a moment to make sure they work!  One of the best ways to check your breaks is to mount your bike and lean all of your weight on your handle bars while applying the front break. Push forward with your legs. You should be able to put all your weight on the handlebars without the front wheel moving.  You can test your rear break the same way but with applying your weight to the saddle instead of the handlebars.   If your breaks don't feel solid, don't take a chance. Take your bike into the shop to be checked out.
  3. Lastly, clean and oil your chain.  Simply flip your bike upside down so the wheels are in the air and it is resting on the saddle and handlebars (you might want to place it on an old towel or blanket to prevent scratches or scuff marks).  This will allow the wheels, and hence chain, to move freely while you turn the crankset (pedals).  Take a rag in the palm of your hand and wrap it around the chain. Hold the chain semi-tightly while you turn the cranks a couple times. You very well may see your chain getting cleaner before your eyes as you wipe away all of last year's gunk. Once your chain is relatively clean, add no more than one drop of oil to each link. The oil on your chain protects your chain from dirt and rust and aids in proper smooth shifting. But be careful not to apply too much oil!  An overly oiled chain actually attracts dirt and makes shifting less smooth. After the oil drops have had a moment to settle, take another rag and give the crank another turn, this time, letting the chain lightly run through the rag to wipe off any excess oil.  
Just like you would with a car, if you've put in some pretty decent mileage the previous year, take it in to a bike shop and ask the staff if the bike needs a tune up. They will tighten up any loose cables, check your headset and your break pads, and make sure everything is running as smoothly and safely as it should be.  We are lucky here in Burlington; local shops will give free and honest evaluations. Keep in mind, there are some bike components that do wear and need to be replaced from time to time such as chains, brake pads, and cassette (the gears on the rear wheel) just as brake pads and motor oil are regularly changed in your car. 
 
But with only a few minutes of your time, you AND your bike will have a fantastic summer of riding!
 
Be safe and have fun!
]]>
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Learn to Cook With Herbs from the Experts at Red Wagon Plants https://www.localvoretoday.com/2013/06/11/learn-to-cook-with-herbs-from-the-experts-at-red-wagon-plants/ https://www.localvoretoday.com/2013/06/11/learn-to-cook-with-herbs-from-the-experts-at-red-wagon-plants/#comments Tue, 11 Jun 2013 15:49:49 +0000 https://www.localvoretoday.com/?p=65595 herbs-small

herbs-small Herbs turn simple, everyday meals into complex and richly flavored feasts with just a few simple steps added to the kitchen routine. Here are a few quick ideas for using herbs -- the more often herbs are used, the easier it is to see that they are a great way to eat more healthfully. Heavy sauces and other fats are easily replaced with the welcome freshness and enlivened flavor of fresh herbs. It is easiest to do this with a small array of home grown herbs in pots that stay in a sunny window in winter and then move into bigger pots to spend the summer by the door closest to the kitchen. They will be used the most regularly if they are right near where they will be used. It is a good idea to also have an herb garden for more variety and quantity, but the real day to day work horses of the herb world like to stay close to the cook.
  • A simple herb salad of finely chopped parsley, cilantro, and mint with a drizzle of olive oil, some good sea salt and the juice of half a lemon or lime is a great condiment for fresh fish, roasted chicken, grilled vegetables or meats, and anything else that can use a quick burst of flavor. Play with the proportions and types of herbs. This is something that can easily be customized to the mood of the day, the food being used, and what’s available in the garden.
  • A few sprigs of chopped sage or rosemary added to scrambled eggs give breakfast a new dimension of flavor. A great spring dish is to make a simple cheese omelet mixing a cup of finely chopped herbs into the eggs. This becomes a green pancake packed with flavor.
  • Herb stems added to the stock pot by the handful will create depth to soups and broths. Cilantro or parsley or basil, chopped fine are a great addition at the end of the cooking process for soups of all types. Clear soups will become enlivened and creamy or pureed soups will develop a mellow complexity.
  • Keep a container of washed and chopped herbs in the fridge, mixed with chopped scallions if you like, and toss these into green salads, mashed potatoes, roasted vegetables, anywhere you can use an easy addition of flavor. Doing the prep work ahead of time can give you a week’s worth of meal improvement in one easy step. Parsley and cilantro and dill are well suited to this use. Basil is best kept intact and treated like cut-flowers (cut stems and place in water and keep on the counter) since it does not like the cold of the refrigerator.
  • A great and uplifting brew can be made with handfuls of lemon balm, various mints, and even some lavender sprigs. Just drop them into a large pot of boiling water, let steep a 5 to 10 minutes, strain and sweeten with honey if desired. Drink hot or cold.
Thank you to our friends at Red Wagon Plants for helping us spice up our lives and giving us permission to share these great tips!  For more information about Red Wagon Plants and for loads of wonderful recipes, click here and don't forget to check out our current offer with Red Wagon Plants (benefiting the Vermont Community Garden Network)!
]]>
herbs-small

herbs-small Herbs turn simple, everyday meals into complex and richly flavored feasts with just a few simple steps added to the kitchen routine. Here are a few quick ideas for using herbs -- the more often herbs are used, the easier it is to see that they are a great way to eat more healthfully. Heavy sauces and other fats are easily replaced with the welcome freshness and enlivened flavor of fresh herbs. It is easiest to do this with a small array of home grown herbs in pots that stay in a sunny window in winter and then move into bigger pots to spend the summer by the door closest to the kitchen. They will be used the most regularly if they are right near where they will be used. It is a good idea to also have an herb garden for more variety and quantity, but the real day to day work horses of the herb world like to stay close to the cook.
  • A simple herb salad of finely chopped parsley, cilantro, and mint with a drizzle of olive oil, some good sea salt and the juice of half a lemon or lime is a great condiment for fresh fish, roasted chicken, grilled vegetables or meats, and anything else that can use a quick burst of flavor. Play with the proportions and types of herbs. This is something that can easily be customized to the mood of the day, the food being used, and what’s available in the garden.
  • A few sprigs of chopped sage or rosemary added to scrambled eggs give breakfast a new dimension of flavor. A great spring dish is to make a simple cheese omelet mixing a cup of finely chopped herbs into the eggs. This becomes a green pancake packed with flavor.
  • Herb stems added to the stock pot by the handful will create depth to soups and broths. Cilantro or parsley or basil, chopped fine are a great addition at the end of the cooking process for soups of all types. Clear soups will become enlivened and creamy or pureed soups will develop a mellow complexity.
  • Keep a container of washed and chopped herbs in the fridge, mixed with chopped scallions if you like, and toss these into green salads, mashed potatoes, roasted vegetables, anywhere you can use an easy addition of flavor. Doing the prep work ahead of time can give you a week’s worth of meal improvement in one easy step. Parsley and cilantro and dill are well suited to this use. Basil is best kept intact and treated like cut-flowers (cut stems and place in water and keep on the counter) since it does not like the cold of the refrigerator.
  • A great and uplifting brew can be made with handfuls of lemon balm, various mints, and even some lavender sprigs. Just drop them into a large pot of boiling water, let steep a 5 to 10 minutes, strain and sweeten with honey if desired. Drink hot or cold.
Thank you to our friends at Red Wagon Plants for helping us spice up our lives and giving us permission to share these great tips!  For more information about Red Wagon Plants and for loads of wonderful recipes, click here and don't forget to check out our current offer with Red Wagon Plants (benefiting the Vermont Community Garden Network)!
]]>
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Want to Stop Biting Your Nails? Our Friends at Tootsies Mini Spa Can Tell You How! https://www.localvoretoday.com/2013/05/30/want-to-stop-biting-your-nails-our-friends-at-tootsies-mini-spa-can-tell-you-how/ https://www.localvoretoday.com/2013/05/30/want-to-stop-biting-your-nails-our-friends-at-tootsies-mini-spa-can-tell-you-how/#comments Thu, 30 May 2013 14:00:58 +0000 https://www.localvoretoday.com/?p=62352 Have you ever wondered why people bite their nails?  Most People tend to bite their nails as a simple habit or to smooth the edges, while some do it out of boredom or to ease nervousness and anxiety.  Doctors do believe that nail biting is mainly induced by stress with about 45% of teenagers and 25% adults that bite their nails on a regular basis.  Now on a scale of bad habits most would not consider nail biting that bad, however the amount of germs that get under your nails on a daily basis makes it extremely unhealthy and unsanitary.

Your hands touch everything, and washing your hands does NOT get the dirt out from under your nails.  Dirt, germs, viruses and bacteria live under your fingernails and it is considered one of the germiest parts of our body.  In fact the amount of germs that are under your nails is equal to that of a bathroom doorknob!!!  Ew!

After hearing that would you like to stop biting your nails?  The good news is it only takes about 30 days to break a habit so in one month you could be cured of your nail biting habit. There are several different ways to stop biting your nails one being to put lotion or cuticle oil on your nails and cuticles because the bitter taste will make you cringe and make it a little easier to stop in the moment.  The most recommended way is to get regular manicures.  Not only will you love the way your nails look but  having a pretty polish on your nails is a great reminder to not bite them.  If you don’t think regular polish will work for you consider getting a shellac manicure.  The shellac polish is cured under LED lights and is much sturdier then regular polish, lasting between 10-14, and will make it harder for you to bite your nails.

So the next time you go to bite your nails, think about all the people that don’t wash their hands when leaving the bathroom and give yourself a manicure instead.  :)
For more tips and from Tootsie, visit: http://tootsiesminispa.com/blog/
Reprinted with permission from our friends as Tootsies Mini Spa!
]]>

Have you ever wondered why people bite their nails?  Most People tend to bite their nails as a simple habit or to smooth the edges, while some do it out of boredom or to ease nervousness and anxiety.  Doctors do believe that nail biting is mainly induced by stress with about 45% of teenagers and 25% adults that bite their nails on a regular basis.  Now on a scale of bad habits most would not consider nail biting that bad, however the amount of germs that get under your nails on a daily basis makes it extremely unhealthy and unsanitary.

Your hands touch everything, and washing your hands does NOT get the dirt out from under your nails.  Dirt, germs, viruses and bacteria live under your fingernails and it is considered one of the germiest parts of our body.  In fact the amount of germs that are under your nails is equal to that of a bathroom doorknob!!!  Ew!

After hearing that would you like to stop biting your nails?  The good news is it only takes about 30 days to break a habit so in one month you could be cured of your nail biting habit. There are several different ways to stop biting your nails one being to put lotion or cuticle oil on your nails and cuticles because the bitter taste will make you cringe and make it a little easier to stop in the moment.  The most recommended way is to get regular manicures.  Not only will you love the way your nails look but  having a pretty polish on your nails is a great reminder to not bite them.  If you don’t think regular polish will work for you consider getting a shellac manicure.  The shellac polish is cured under LED lights and is much sturdier then regular polish, lasting between 10-14, and will make it harder for you to bite your nails.

So the next time you go to bite your nails, think about all the people that don’t wash their hands when leaving the bathroom and give yourself a manicure instead.  :)

For more tips and from Tootsie, visit: http://tootsiesminispa.com/blog/
Reprinted with permission from our friends as Tootsies Mini Spa!
Have you ever wondered why people bite their nails?  Most People tend to bite their nails as a simple habit or to smooth the edges, while some do it out of boredom or to ease nervousness and anxiety.  Doctors do believe that nail biting is mainly induced by stress with about 45% of teenagers and 25% adults that bite their nails on a regular basis.  Now on a scale of bad habits most would not consider nail biting that bad, however the amount of germs that get under your nails on a daily basis makes it extremely unhealthy and unsanitary.

Your hands touch everything, and washing your hands does NOT get the dirt out from under your nails.  Dirt, germs, viruses and bacteria live under your fingernails and it is considered one of the germiest parts of our body.  In fact the amount of germs that are under your nails is equal to that of a bathroom doorknob!!!  Ew!

After hearing that would you like to stop biting your nails?  The good news is it only takes about 30 days to break a habit so in one month you could be cured of your nail biting habit. There are several different ways to stop biting your nails one being to put lotion or cuticle oil on your nails and cuticles because the bitter taste will make you cringe and make it a little easier to stop in the moment.  The most recommended way is to get regular manicures.  Not only will you love the way your nails look but  having a pretty polish on your nails is a great reminder to not bite them.  If you don’t think regular polish will work for you consider getting a shellac manicure.  The shellac polish is cured under LED lights and is much sturdier then regular polish, lasting between 10-14, and will make it harder for you to bite your nails.

So the next time you go to bite your nails, think about all the people that don’t wash their hands when leaving the bathroom and give yourself a manicure instead.  :)
For more tips and from Tootsie, visit: http://tootsiesminispa.com/blog/
Reprinted with permission from our friends as Tootsies Mini Spa!
]]>
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Kick Off Summer at the South End Truck Stop https://www.localvoretoday.com/2013/05/21/kick-off-summer-at-the-south-end-truck-stop/ https://www.localvoretoday.com/2013/05/21/kick-off-summer-at-the-south-end-truck-stop/#comments Tue, 21 May 2013 13:36:42 +0000 https://www.localvoretoday.com/?p=59054 artsriot-truckstop

artsriotCelebrate the start of summer this Friday, May 24 from 4:30-9pm at the first South End Truck Stop hosted by our friends at ArtsRiot. In case you haven't heard, ArtsRiot is an online magazine, an events calendar, a media company, a gallery, a venue, a promotor, an amalgamator of art, food music and culture and a community organizer--and they are PASSIONATE about killing apathy and inspiring community by connecting people through art, food and music. A lofty goal?  Perhaps, but easier to accomplish than one might think.  Come to the South End Truck Stop this Friday and you'll experience what I mean! Food trucks, those restaurants on wheels we keep seeing more and more of around town, are far more than mere snack shacks with trendy exteriors.  Food trucks are the quintessential small business, run by people who are so passionate about what they do and the delicious food they create, that they are out there day after day, seeking US out in our parking lots and street corners beckoning us, as if to say "I've created something sooo amazing, you just have to try it!"  Really, I mean what other type of restaurant picks up everything and takes their food to YOU? truck-stop-banner There's a lot to like about food trucks. They are incredibly convenient, a great way to try new cuisine, a soul-saving antithesis to food chains and a virtual salvation if you work in a food dessert.  But what I love most about food trucks is the face-to-face contact they give me with the chef.  I can literally walk up to the window of their kitchen to order a meal.  That sort of intimacy allows me to witness how their menu changes according to feedback and availability.  I get to glimpse, at least a small portion, of the skill and hard work that goes into offering up an ever changing selection of deliciousness.  And I get to ask what's new and chat about things all while watching my meal manifest before my eyes.  What a treat! Being able to partake of someone else's passion--even if that passion comes in the form of a "hell of a good" sandwich or an original craft beer, or an invigorating concoction of juices--wakes me up and energizes me.  So, imagine filling a parking lot with a variety of intoxicating flavors and tantalizing smells and the passionate chefs creating them, then add the heart thumping vibe of live music, good friends and great conversation and THAT…is the South End Truck Stop! The celebration will take place in the parking lot of 400 Pine St. and feature amazing local food and drinks by:
Burger Barntomgirl Southern Smoke The Hindquarter Muchacho Taco Duino Duende Mocean Mate Tomgirl Juice SoYo Frozen Yogurt Lake Champlain Chocolates ice cream and Fiddlehead Brewery ...all to benefit the Chittenden Emergency Food Shelf!
We can't wait and we'll see you there!  ]]>
artsriot-truckstop

artsriotCelebrate the start of summer this Friday, May 24 from 4:30-9pm at the first South End Truck Stop hosted by our friends at ArtsRiot. In case you haven't heard, ArtsRiot is an online magazine, an events calendar, a media company, a gallery, a venue, a promotor, an amalgamator of art, food music and culture and a community organizer--and they are PASSIONATE about killing apathy and inspiring community by connecting people through art, food and music. A lofty goal?  Perhaps, but easier to accomplish than one might think.  Come to the South End Truck Stop this Friday and you'll experience what I mean! Food trucks, those restaurants on wheels we keep seeing more and more of around town, are far more than mere snack shacks with trendy exteriors.  Food trucks are the quintessential small business, run by people who are so passionate about what they do and the delicious food they create, that they are out there day after day, seeking US out in our parking lots and street corners beckoning us, as if to say "I've created something sooo amazing, you just have to try it!"  Really, I mean what other type of restaurant picks up everything and takes their food to YOU? truck-stop-banner There's a lot to like about food trucks. They are incredibly convenient, a great way to try new cuisine, a soul-saving antithesis to food chains and a virtual salvation if you work in a food dessert.  But what I love most about food trucks is the face-to-face contact they give me with the chef.  I can literally walk up to the window of their kitchen to order a meal.  That sort of intimacy allows me to witness how their menu changes according to feedback and availability.  I get to glimpse, at least a small portion, of the skill and hard work that goes into offering up an ever changing selection of deliciousness.  And I get to ask what's new and chat about things all while watching my meal manifest before my eyes.  What a treat! Being able to partake of someone else's passion--even if that passion comes in the form of a "hell of a good" sandwich or an original craft beer, or an invigorating concoction of juices--wakes me up and energizes me.  So, imagine filling a parking lot with a variety of intoxicating flavors and tantalizing smells and the passionate chefs creating them, then add the heart thumping vibe of live music, good friends and great conversation and THAT…is the South End Truck Stop! The celebration will take place in the parking lot of 400 Pine St. and feature amazing local food and drinks by:
Burger Barntomgirl Southern Smoke The Hindquarter Muchacho Taco Duino Duende Mocean Mate Tomgirl Juice SoYo Frozen Yogurt Lake Champlain Chocolates ice cream and Fiddlehead Brewery ...all to benefit the Chittenden Emergency Food Shelf!
We can't wait and we'll see you there!  ]]>
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What Does Fair Trade Have To Do With Buying Local? https://www.localvoretoday.com/2013/05/17/what-does-fair-trade-have-to-do-with-buying-local/ https://www.localvoretoday.com/2013/05/17/what-does-fair-trade-have-to-do-with-buying-local/#comments Fri, 17 May 2013 13:00:22 +0000 https://www.localvoretoday.com/?p=58216 IMG_1201IMG_1197 But what does buying local have to do with Fair Trade? Isn't Fair Trade focused on impacting international business practices to improve the lives of farmers and laborers in countries far...far way?!? Well…yes…BUT…those laborers aren't as far away and different from you as you might think.  The products of their labor fill our pantries and our closets. The real distance is created by the consumer's lack of knowledge regarding the conditions and environment surrounding the products they buy. The conventional market place, both at home and abroad, exacerbates that distance by striping products of the fingerprints that created them.  As consumers, we often buy goods without knowing anything about the conditions under which they were made, the use of chemicals or materials that went into them, or the quality of life, gender or even age of the people who made them. Both the Localvore and the Fair Trade movements aim to lessen that distance by creating a relationship between consumers and producers through knowledge. IMG_1196 "Fair Trade is a movement born out of the need for a more transparent and fair way of trading in our global market," says Gaby Ochoa Brenneman, of FTBN. By educating consumers on how and where products are made, Fair Trade supporters hope consumers will be empowered and inspired to choose which companies and business practices]they want to support with their cash! The very same principles underlie the Localvore movement. By buying local, Localvores aim to build a connection and relationship between the consumer and the local farmers who grow the vegetables, produce the meat and dairy, and provide expert services that enrich our lives right here in our own neighborhood. Fair Trade takes that to a global scale. "When it comes to commodities that can't be grown in the United States like coffee, cocoa, sugar and bananas," says Brenneman, "I am glad there is a Fair Trade movement that allows me to have all of these products knowing that I am supporting a direct connection with the small farmers in other countries and be sure they are getting a fair price for their products and are working under just and safe conditions." Both the Fair Trade and the Localvore movements give a voice and a fair chance to the small and independent farmers and laborers who are often taken advantage of, disempowered and overwhelmed by big business.  Buying fair and buying local gives that power back.  They also remind you, the consumer, that you have power too!  It's the power to make informed decisions and to choose who you support with your business.  You don't have to save the whole world all at once OR all by yourself.  But if we all do a little bit to get to know and show respect for the farmers, laborers and artists behind the things we purchase everyday, together, we can have a huge impact. Buy Fair. Buy Local. Buy Responsibly. And have fun!  ]]> The gang from Localvore Today had a blast serving up hot cups of steaming Fair Trade Coffee at the World Fair Trade Day celebration, in City Hall Park, last weekend.

We are proud to be working along side our friends from the Peace and Justice store and the Fair Trade Burlington Network (FTBN).
IMG_1201IMG_1197

But what does buying local have to do with Fair Trade? Isn’t Fair Trade focused on impacting international business practices to improve the lives of farmers and laborers in countries far…far way?!?

Well…yes…BUT…those laborers aren’t as far away and different from you as you might think.  The products of their labor fill our pantries and our closets. The real distance is created by the consumer’s lack of knowledge regarding the conditions and environment surrounding the products they buy. The conventional market place, both at home and abroad, exacerbates that distance by striping products of the fingerprints that created them.  As consumers, we often buy goods without knowing anything about the conditions under which they were made, the use of chemicals or materials that went into them, or the quality of life, gender or even age of the people who made them.

Both the Localvore and the Fair Trade movements aim to lessen that distance by creating a relationship between consumers and producers through knowledge.

IMG_1196

“Fair Trade is a movement born out of the need for a more transparent and fair way of trading in our global market,” says Gaby Ochoa Brenneman, of FTBN. By educating consumers on how and where products are made, Fair Trade supporters hope consumers will be empowered and inspired to choose which companies and business practices]they want to support with their cash! The very same principles underlie the Localvore movement.

By buying local, Localvores aim to build a connection and relationship between the consumer and the local farmers who grow the vegetables, produce the meat and dairy, and provide expert services that enrich our lives right here in our own neighborhood. Fair Trade takes that to a global scale.

“When it comes to commodities that can’t be grown in the United States like coffee, cocoa, sugar and bananas,” says Brenneman, “I am glad there is a Fair Trade movement that allows me to have all of these products knowing that I am supporting a direct connection with the small farmers in other countries and be sure they are getting a fair price for their products and are working under just and safe conditions.”

Both the Fair Trade and the Localvore movements give a voice and a fair chance to the small and independent farmers and laborers who are often taken advantage of, disempowered and overwhelmed by big business.  Buying fair and buying local gives that power back.  They also remind you, the consumer, that you have power too!  It’s the power to make informed decisions and to choose who you support with your business.  You don’t have to save the whole world all at once OR all by yourself.  But if we all do a little bit to get to know and show respect for the farmers, laborers and artists behind the things we purchase everyday, together, we can have a huge impact.

Buy Fair. Buy Local. Buy Responsibly. And have fun!

 

The gang from Localvore Today had a blast serving up hot cups of steaming Fair Trade Coffee at the World Fair Trade Day celebration, in City Hall Park, last weekend. We are proud to be working along side our friends from the Peace and Justice store and the Fair Trade Burlington Network (FTBN). IMG_1201IMG_1197 But what does buying local have to do with Fair Trade? Isn't Fair Trade focused on impacting international business practices to improve the lives of farmers and laborers in countries far...far way?!? Well…yes…BUT…those laborers aren't as far away and different from you as you might think.  The products of their labor fill our pantries and our closets. The real distance is created by the consumer's lack of knowledge regarding the conditions and environment surrounding the products they buy. The conventional market place, both at home and abroad, exacerbates that distance by striping products of the fingerprints that created them.  As consumers, we often buy goods without knowing anything about the conditions under which they were made, the use of chemicals or materials that went into them, or the quality of life, gender or even age of the people who made them. Both the Localvore and the Fair Trade movements aim to lessen that distance by creating a relationship between consumers and producers through knowledge. IMG_1196 "Fair Trade is a movement born out of the need for a more transparent and fair way of trading in our global market," says Gaby Ochoa Brenneman, of FTBN. By educating consumers on how and where products are made, Fair Trade supporters hope consumers will be empowered and inspired to choose which companies and business practices]they want to support with their cash! The very same principles underlie the Localvore movement. By buying local, Localvores aim to build a connection and relationship between the consumer and the local farmers who grow the vegetables, produce the meat and dairy, and provide expert services that enrich our lives right here in our own neighborhood. Fair Trade takes that to a global scale. "When it comes to commodities that can't be grown in the United States like coffee, cocoa, sugar and bananas," says Brenneman, "I am glad there is a Fair Trade movement that allows me to have all of these products knowing that I am supporting a direct connection with the small farmers in other countries and be sure they are getting a fair price for their products and are working under just and safe conditions." Both the Fair Trade and the Localvore movements give a voice and a fair chance to the small and independent farmers and laborers who are often taken advantage of, disempowered and overwhelmed by big business.  Buying fair and buying local gives that power back.  They also remind you, the consumer, that you have power too!  It's the power to make informed decisions and to choose who you support with your business.  You don't have to save the whole world all at once OR all by yourself.  But if we all do a little bit to get to know and show respect for the farmers, laborers and artists behind the things we purchase everyday, together, we can have a huge impact. Buy Fair. Buy Local. Buy Responsibly. And have fun!  ]]>
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How much do you really know about Lake Champlain? https://www.localvoretoday.com/2013/05/17/lake-champlain-fun-facts/ https://www.localvoretoday.com/2013/05/17/lake-champlain-fun-facts/#comments Fri, 17 May 2013 12:00:04 +0000 https://www.localvoretoday.com/?p=57608 lake-champlain-basin-program

It’s true that Vermont is known for its stunning mountains and fantastic skiing, its quaint pastoral scenes and breathtaking fall foliage.  But for many, the real icing on the proverbial cake, is Lake Champlain!  Ringed by mountains, fertile valleys and an incredibly intricate and diverse shoreline, Lake Champlain is a playground and treasure trove for young and old alike.  If you live in (or even near) Vermont, it’s no doubt that you’ve made a trip to visit the lake at SOME point, in your past.  And if you live in or around Burlington, like us, you may even be lucky enough to enjoy the   lake everyday.  But how much do you really KNOW about the lake?  Take a moment to peruse these facts about our amazing lake.  You might be surprised by what you discover! lake-champlain-basin-programLake Champlain Facts
  • Lake Champlain now flows north to the St. Lawrence River, but during the Ice Age, the Lake flowed south, emptying into the Hudson River.
  • The lake is 120 miles (193 kilometers) long and flows from Whitehall, New York north almost across the U.S./Canadian border to its outlet at the Richelieu River in Quebec. From there, the water joins the St. Lawrence River, which eventually drains into the Atlantic Ocean at the Gulf of St. Lawrence.
  • The Lake’s intricate shoreline measures over 587 miles.
  • More than 70 islands dot the waters, and numerous inlets and bays add to the complexity of the Lake’s narrow profile.
  • The deepest point in Lake Champlain, plunges down 400 feet, and can be found between Charlotte , VT and Essex, NY.  The lake’s average depth is 64 feet.
  • The southernmost regions of the South Lake are much like a river, which widens into the scenic expanse of the Main Lake.
  • At Malletts Bay, the Lake reaches its greatest width, stretching 12 miles across.
  • To the north, the Champlain Islands define an area known as the Northeast Arm, and in the far northeastern corner are the shallow waters of Missisquoi Bay.
  • There are about 54 public or commercial beaches and 10 private beaches on the Lake’s shores. Visit the Lake Champlain Basin Atlas Beaches page for more information.
  • The record high water level of 103.57 ft. was recorded in 2011 near Whitehall, NY (Burlington, VT recorded 103.27 ft. in the same year).
  • The record low water level of 92.4 ft. was recorded in 1908.
  • Lake Area: 435 sq. miles (1127 sq. kilometers) of surface water.
  • Average Volume of Water: 6.8 trillion gallons (25.8 cubic kilometers).
  • Fifty-six percent of the Basin is in Vermont, 37% is in New York, and 7% is in the Province of Quebec.
  • Average Annual Air Temperature: 40-45 degrees Fahrenheit (4.4-7.2 Celsius).
  • Population of Basin: 571,000 (541,000 in the US according to the 2000 Census Data, and 30,000 in Quebec). About 68% live in Vermont, 27% in New York, and 5% in Quebec. Density is about 61 people per sq. mi.
  • Drinking Water Use: Approximately 200,000 people, or about 35% of the Basin population, depend on Lake Champlain for drinking water. Approximately 4,149 draw water directly from Lake Champlain for individual use. There are 99 public water systems drawing water from Lake Champlain.
  • On a typical summer day in 1992, there were 7500 motor boats, 3000 sailboats, 15 commercial vessels, and countless swimmers, wind surfers, kayakers, canoers and scuba divers on or in the lake. 10 years later that number has increased significantly.
  • 81 species of fish, 318 species of birds, 56 species of mammals, plus 21 species of amphibians and 20 species of reptiles also rely on Lake Champlain for their drinking water.
  • The lake is a major breeding area and a stopping point for spring and fall birds migrating along the Atlantic flyway.
  • 16 species of birds found in the Champlain Basin are listed as endangered species.
  • Its the largest freshwater lake in the U.S. after the five Great Lakes
  • Lake Champlain is believed to have the best collection of historic shipwrecks in North America
  • Samuel de Champlain discovered the lake in 1609
  • It MAY be the home of Champ, our very own lake monster!
Thank you to the Lake Champlain Basin Program--an incredible source of information about Lake Champlain and the Lake Champlain Basin, for providing us with the vast majority of these facts! For more information about their program and about the history and health of the lake, please visit www.lcbp.org!]]>
lake-champlain-basin-program

It’s true that Vermont is known for its stunning mountains and fantastic skiing, its quaint pastoral scenes and breathtaking fall foliage.  But for many, the real icing on the proverbial cake, is Lake Champlain!  Ringed by mountains, fertile valleys and an incredibly intricate and diverse shoreline, Lake Champlain is a playground and treasure trove for young and old alike.  If you live in (or even near) Vermont, it’s no doubt that you’ve made a trip to visit the lake at SOME point, in your past.  And if you live in or around Burlington, like us, you may even be lucky enough to enjoy the   lake everyday.  But how much do you really KNOW about the lake?  Take a moment to peruse these facts about our amazing lake.  You might be surprised by what you discover! lake-champlain-basin-programLake Champlain Facts
  • Lake Champlain now flows north to the St. Lawrence River, but during the Ice Age, the Lake flowed south, emptying into the Hudson River.
  • The lake is 120 miles (193 kilometers) long and flows from Whitehall, New York north almost across the U.S./Canadian border to its outlet at the Richelieu River in Quebec. From there, the water joins the St. Lawrence River, which eventually drains into the Atlantic Ocean at the Gulf of St. Lawrence.
  • The Lake’s intricate shoreline measures over 587 miles.
  • More than 70 islands dot the waters, and numerous inlets and bays add to the complexity of the Lake’s narrow profile.
  • The deepest point in Lake Champlain, plunges down 400 feet, and can be found between Charlotte , VT and Essex, NY.  The lake’s average depth is 64 feet.
  • The southernmost regions of the South Lake are much like a river, which widens into the scenic expanse of the Main Lake.
  • At Malletts Bay, the Lake reaches its greatest width, stretching 12 miles across.
  • To the north, the Champlain Islands define an area known as the Northeast Arm, and in the far northeastern corner are the shallow waters of Missisquoi Bay.
  • There are about 54 public or commercial beaches and 10 private beaches on the Lake’s shores. Visit the Lake Champlain Basin Atlas Beaches page for more information.
  • The record high water level of 103.57 ft. was recorded in 2011 near Whitehall, NY (Burlington, VT recorded 103.27 ft. in the same year).
  • The record low water level of 92.4 ft. was recorded in 1908.
  • Lake Area: 435 sq. miles (1127 sq. kilometers) of surface water.
  • Average Volume of Water: 6.8 trillion gallons (25.8 cubic kilometers).
  • Fifty-six percent of the Basin is in Vermont, 37% is in New York, and 7% is in the Province of Quebec.
  • Average Annual Air Temperature: 40-45 degrees Fahrenheit (4.4-7.2 Celsius).
  • Population of Basin: 571,000 (541,000 in the US according to the 2000 Census Data, and 30,000 in Quebec). About 68% live in Vermont, 27% in New York, and 5% in Quebec. Density is about 61 people per sq. mi.
  • Drinking Water Use: Approximately 200,000 people, or about 35% of the Basin population, depend on Lake Champlain for drinking water. Approximately 4,149 draw water directly from Lake Champlain for individual use. There are 99 public water systems drawing water from Lake Champlain.
  • On a typical summer day in 1992, there were 7500 motor boats, 3000 sailboats, 15 commercial vessels, and countless swimmers, wind surfers, kayakers, canoers and scuba divers on or in the lake. 10 years later that number has increased significantly.
  • 81 species of fish, 318 species of birds, 56 species of mammals, plus 21 species of amphibians and 20 species of reptiles also rely on Lake Champlain for their drinking water.
  • The lake is a major breeding area and a stopping point for spring and fall birds migrating along the Atlantic flyway.
  • 16 species of birds found in the Champlain Basin are listed as endangered species.
  • Its the largest freshwater lake in the U.S. after the five Great Lakes
  • Lake Champlain is believed to have the best collection of historic shipwrecks in North America
  • Samuel de Champlain discovered the lake in 1609
  • It MAY be the home of Champ, our very own lake monster!
Thank you to the Lake Champlain Basin Program--an incredible source of information about Lake Champlain and the Lake Champlain Basin, for providing us with the vast majority of these facts! For more information about their program and about the history and health of the lake, please visit www.lcbp.org!]]>
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Fiddlehead Ricotta Tart Recipe from The Nomadic Oven https://www.localvoretoday.com/2013/05/14/fiddlehead-ricotta-tart-recipe-from-the-nomadic-oven/ https://www.localvoretoday.com/2013/05/14/fiddlehead-ricotta-tart-recipe-from-the-nomadic-oven/#comments Tue, 14 May 2013 11:00:18 +0000 https://www.localvoretoday.com/?p=57200 fiddleheads-crate

Introduction

Today we're featuring an offer for The Nomadic Oven, our first Burlington Farmers' Market offer for the summer season! We can't get enough of Jen's baked goods, so we had her send us a recipe to share with you and whet your appetite. Depending on the weather, serve this warm tart with a wintry salad of grated carrots and beets, or a springtime mix of fresh greens and herbs. Enjoy with a glass of rosé to toast the brief fiddlehead season.

Ingredients

fiddleheads-crate

1 (9-inch) round of flaky tart dough, homemade or store-bought
8 oz. fiddleheads, cleaned and trimmed
8 oz. whole-milk ricotta cheese
tsp. fresh thyme or sage, finely chopped
½ tsp. salt, or to taste
½ tsp. freshly ground black pepper

Steps

  1. Line a greased 9-inch tart pan, flan ring, or pie pan with the pastry dough, folding and crimping the edges inward. Place in the freezer until firm, about 30 minutes.
  2. While the tart dough is chilling, bring a medium pot of water to a rolling boil and add the fiddleheads. Boil just until tender, about 5 minutes. Rinse under cold water and drain.
  3. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees.
  4. In a small bowl, mix the ricotta with the salt, pepper, and fresh herbs. Spread the ricotta mixture in the bottom of the tart shell, and arrange the fiddleheads on top in a single layer.
  5. Bake the tart for 35 to 40 minutes, until the cheese has puffed slightly and the crust is golden brown. Let cool for several minutes before serving.
]]>
fiddleheads-crate

Introduction

Today we're featuring an offer for The Nomadic Oven, our first Burlington Farmers' Market offer for the summer season! We can't get enough of Jen's baked goods, so we had her send us a recipe to share with you and whet your appetite. Depending on the weather, serve this warm tart with a wintry salad of grated carrots and beets, or a springtime mix of fresh greens and herbs. Enjoy with a glass of rosé to toast the brief fiddlehead season.

Ingredients

fiddleheads-crate

1 (9-inch) round of flaky tart dough, homemade or store-bought
8 oz. fiddleheads, cleaned and trimmed
8 oz. whole-milk ricotta cheese
tsp. fresh thyme or sage, finely chopped
½ tsp. salt, or to taste
½ tsp. freshly ground black pepper

Steps

  1. Line a greased 9-inch tart pan, flan ring, or pie pan with the pastry dough, folding and crimping the edges inward. Place in the freezer until firm, about 30 minutes.
  2. While the tart dough is chilling, bring a medium pot of water to a rolling boil and add the fiddleheads. Boil just until tender, about 5 minutes. Rinse under cold water and drain.
  3. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees.
  4. In a small bowl, mix the ricotta with the salt, pepper, and fresh herbs. Spread the ricotta mixture in the bottom of the tart shell, and arrange the fiddleheads on top in a single layer.
  5. Bake the tart for 35 to 40 minutes, until the cheese has puffed slightly and the crust is golden brown. Let cool for several minutes before serving.
]]>
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The Secret is in the Syrup! More Good Stuff From Nutty Steph’s https://www.localvoretoday.com/2013/05/13/the-secret-is-in-the-syrup-more-good-stuff-from-nutty-stephs/ https://www.localvoretoday.com/2013/05/13/the-secret-is-in-the-syrup-more-good-stuff-from-nutty-stephs/#comments Mon, 13 May 2013 12:56:29 +0000 https://www.localvoretoday.com/?p=57053 Nutty-Granola Ever wonder what makes Nutty Steph's granola taste so amazingly good?  Well, its no surprise that the answer lies in the ingredients! Nutty Steph's original Vermont Granola contains oats, pure maple syrup, expeller pressed sunflower oil, almonds, walnuts, hazelnuts, sunflower seeds, cinnamon, vanilla and sea salt. Always fresh, full of nuts and carefully baked to a luscious, crunchy texture. Most granolas on the market are sweetened with refined sugar, but not Nutty Steph’s. Here’s why they use real Vermont maple syrup in their granola instead of sugar: Maple Syrup is a natural product made from the sap of maple trees. It takes at least 40 gallons of sap to make just one gallon of Maple Syrup! This number can get even higher depending on the natural sugar level of the sap. The great amount of labor and varying nature of sap output from season to season results in a product far more expensive than refined sugar. It’s worth the extra expense for the high quality, pleasant taste, and health benefits that Maple Syrup has to offer. Not only does Maple Syrup have a fantastic and full flavor, it is gentler on the body and easier to metabolize than sugar, so it doesn’t produce a “sugar high,” which makes it ideal for children and adults alike. Maple Syrup contains the beneficial minerals calcium, magnesium, and potassium, as well as amino acids, all cornerstones for good health. Maple Syrup, paired with their other high quality ingredients such as locally sourced oats, fresh walnuts, almonds, and hazelnuts makes Nutty Steph’s Granola stand apart from the rest. Treat your body and your tastebuds to the highest quality ingredients and the tastiest granola around.  You'll go nutty for it, too!]]> Nutty-Granola

Ever wonder what makes Nutty Steph’s granola taste so amazingly good?  Well, its no surprise that the answer lies in the ingredients!

Nutty Steph’s original Vermont Granola contains oats, pure maple syrup, expeller pressed sunflower oil, almonds, walnuts, hazelnuts, sunflower seeds, cinnamon, vanilla and sea salt. Always fresh, full of nuts and carefully baked to a luscious, crunchy texture.

Most granolas on the market are sweetened with refined sugar, but not Nutty Steph’s. Here’s why they use real Vermont maple syrup in their granola instead of sugar:

Maple Syrup is a natural product made from the sap of maple trees. It takes at least 40 gallons of sap to make just one gallon of Maple Syrup! This number can get even higher depending on the natural sugar level of the sap. The great amount of labor and varying nature of sap output from season to season results in a product far more expensive than refined sugar. It’s worth the extra expense for the high quality, pleasant taste, and health benefits that Maple Syrup has to offer.

Not only does Maple Syrup have a fantastic and full flavor, it is gentler on the body and easier to metabolize than sugar, so it doesn’t produce a “sugar high,” which makes it ideal for children and adults alike. Maple Syrup contains the beneficial minerals calcium, magnesium, and potassium, as well as amino acids, all cornerstones for good health. Maple Syrup, paired with their other high quality ingredients such as locally sourced oats, fresh walnuts, almonds, and hazelnuts makes Nutty Steph’s Granola stand apart from the rest.

Treat your body and your tastebuds to the highest quality ingredients and the tastiest granola around.  You’ll go nutty for it, too!

Nutty-Granola Ever wonder what makes Nutty Steph's granola taste so amazingly good?  Well, its no surprise that the answer lies in the ingredients! Nutty Steph's original Vermont Granola contains oats, pure maple syrup, expeller pressed sunflower oil, almonds, walnuts, hazelnuts, sunflower seeds, cinnamon, vanilla and sea salt. Always fresh, full of nuts and carefully baked to a luscious, crunchy texture. Most granolas on the market are sweetened with refined sugar, but not Nutty Steph’s. Here’s why they use real Vermont maple syrup in their granola instead of sugar: Maple Syrup is a natural product made from the sap of maple trees. It takes at least 40 gallons of sap to make just one gallon of Maple Syrup! This number can get even higher depending on the natural sugar level of the sap. The great amount of labor and varying nature of sap output from season to season results in a product far more expensive than refined sugar. It’s worth the extra expense for the high quality, pleasant taste, and health benefits that Maple Syrup has to offer. Not only does Maple Syrup have a fantastic and full flavor, it is gentler on the body and easier to metabolize than sugar, so it doesn’t produce a “sugar high,” which makes it ideal for children and adults alike. Maple Syrup contains the beneficial minerals calcium, magnesium, and potassium, as well as amino acids, all cornerstones for good health. Maple Syrup, paired with their other high quality ingredients such as locally sourced oats, fresh walnuts, almonds, and hazelnuts makes Nutty Steph’s Granola stand apart from the rest. Treat your body and your tastebuds to the highest quality ingredients and the tastiest granola around.  You'll go nutty for it, too!]]>
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Support Mom’s Everywhere This Mother’s Day; Give Your Mom the Gift of Fair Trade! https://www.localvoretoday.com/2013/05/10/support-moms-everywhere-this-mothers-day/ https://www.localvoretoday.com/2013/05/10/support-moms-everywhere-this-mothers-day/#comments Fri, 10 May 2013 12:30:20 +0000 https://www.localvoretoday.com/?p=55602 peace-and-justice

Mother's around the world are the backbones of their families and their communities.  Not only do they give birth to us, but traditionally, they also function as the chief nurturers, educators, first aid givers, cleaners and cooks.  They also account for a critical part of the labor force.  A mother's love, dedication and hard work creates a better future for children and communities worldwide. However, many mom's around the world face challenges of gender inequality and disempowerment. [caption id="attachment_55769" align="alignright" width="352"]fair-trade-women photo via Dolma Fair Trade[/caption] According to Fair Trade USA, a leading third-party certifier of Fair Trade products in North America:
  • Women wage workers dominate employment in areas of export-oriented, high-value agriculture in the developing world.  For instance, women represent 75% of banana pickers in Kenya, 70% of flower growers in Colombia, and 90% of Mexican produce pickers.
  • In developing countries, women tend to work longer hours than men. In Asia and Africa, studies have shown that women work as much as 13 hours more per week.
  • In most countries, there is a 5%-10% disparity in the percentage of female-headed households who access credit compared to their male-led counterparts.
  • Of the 775 million adults across the world who cannot read or write, two-thirds of them are women.
  • The maternity mortality rate in developing countries is 15 times higher than that of developed countries.
This Mother's Day, celebrate the talent, work and love of mothers around the world by giving your mom Fair Trade certified gifts.  When you buy Fair Trade, you help empower women across the globe and in your own backyard by ensuring a better life, safer working conditions, economic empowerment, access to education, and improved health and safety, including paid maternity leave and prohibiting sexual harassment  for women around the world. Need some ideas?  Not sure where to look?  Look no further! Well, we've got some fabulous ideas for you!  And you know what makes them EVEN BETTER?  All of these fabulous Fair Trade businesses are LOCAL too!! How great is that?!? logo-dolma1. Scarves, handbags, table linens or stationary from Dolma, fair trade and handmade Dolma is a Vermont based, socially responsible company that specializes in fair trade personal accessories and home décor handmade by economically disadvantaged communities in India. In addition to abiding by fair trade principles of fair wages, women’s empowerment and environmental responsibility, they donate 15% of their profits to schools for children in need. They are a proud member of the Fair Trade Federation. Dolma products can be found at the Peace & Justice Center on the Burlington waterfront, www.pjcvt.org AND at Revolution in White River Junction www.shoptherev.com 2. Jewelry, accessories, pressed flower greeting cards and ReStyle recycled tire tube bags from Hope For Women! hope-for-womenHope For Women is a Burlington., Vt based company that brings premium quality, Fair Trade products created by women artisans to the mainstream marketplace. They are a socially responsible organization committed to providing sustainable employment for economically disadvantaged women worldwide.They offer unique and beautiful products exclusively made by women so they can take control of their lives and their futures. Hope For Women is a proud member of the Fair Trade Federation. Every woman is paid a fair, livable wage under safe and healthy working conditions. Click here to find Hope For Women products in a Vermont store near you! http://www.hopeforwomen.com/lifestyle/locator/vermont/ 3. Hand made and hand woven textiles and accessories by Creative Woman Crecreative-womenative Woman is a Vermont-based, women-owned company, that works in partnership with textile studios in Ethiopia, Swaziland, Afghanistan, Senegal, Mali, Bolivia, Peru, and now India. They import traditionally-inspired contemporary accessories and home textiles. More than just designing and selling textiles, Creative Women works to promote equitable trading practices and to support women’s economic independence. As a member of the Fair Trade Federation, they believe that beautiful things are more beautiful when the people who make them are paid well and work in a safe environment. To find their products in a store near you and online, click here. 4. A wonderful variety of artisan roasted coffees and exotic teas  from Vermont Artisan Coffee & Tea Co. artisan-coffeeMany of Vermont Artisan Coffee’s offerings are certified Organic and Fair Trade. They offer a variety of the finest Arabica coffees from which to choose. They strongly believe in sustainable business practices. Whether it is collaborating with farmers on best coffee growing practices, offering chemical-free, naturally processed decafs, or selecting eco-friendly packaging, they are in it for the long haul. They also believe in Local First. Although coffee isn’t grown here in Vermont, they purchase all their other needs as close to home as possible and embrace their local community by donating weekly to their local food shelf, supporting local fund drives with product and services, working with their local high school for employment outreach, and gifting all compostable materials to local farmers and more. You can find Vermont Artisanal Coffee & Tea products at many local grocery stores, including City Market and Healthy Living, in the Burlington area and online at http://www.vtartisan.com 5. A handmade mug, upcycled home accessories, foods, books, cards and more at the Peace and Justice Center peace-and-justiceThe Peace & Justice Center is a Vermont-based non-profit, membership organization. Their mission is to create a just and peaceful world. They work on the interconnected issues of economic and racial justice, peace, and human rights through education, advocacy, training, non-violent activism and community organizing. As a unique, socially responsible non-profit, they strive for economic justice both in the Vermont community and globally.  Their retail store is a treat for the sense, featuring Fair Trade products from small artisan producers in more than 35 countries across Africa, Latin America, Asia and the Middle East.  They also work to support our local economy by carrying products from local artists, farmers, and companies, as well!  Stop by their Burlington waterfront store or visit them online at http://www.pjcvt.org This Mother's Day, celebrate your mom by supporting women everywhere with beautiful, functional, handcrafted Fair Trade gifts provided by local Vermont businesses! Do know of other Vermont businesses who are dedicated to supporting and providing Fair Trade products to our local community?  Let us know at lara@localvoretoday.com!]]>
peace-and-justice

Mother's around the world are the backbones of their families and their communities.  Not only do they give birth to us, but traditionally, they also function as the chief nurturers, educators, first aid givers, cleaners and cooks.  They also account for a critical part of the labor force.  A mother's love, dedication and hard work creates a better future for children and communities worldwide. However, many mom's around the world face challenges of gender inequality and disempowerment. [caption id="attachment_55769" align="alignright" width="352"]fair-trade-women photo via Dolma Fair Trade[/caption] According to Fair Trade USA, a leading third-party certifier of Fair Trade products in North America:
  • Women wage workers dominate employment in areas of export-oriented, high-value agriculture in the developing world.  For instance, women represent 75% of banana pickers in Kenya, 70% of flower growers in Colombia, and 90% of Mexican produce pickers.
  • In developing countries, women tend to work longer hours than men. In Asia and Africa, studies have shown that women work as much as 13 hours more per week.
  • In most countries, there is a 5%-10% disparity in the percentage of female-headed households who access credit compared to their male-led counterparts.
  • Of the 775 million adults across the world who cannot read or write, two-thirds of them are women.
  • The maternity mortality rate in developing countries is 15 times higher than that of developed countries.
This Mother's Day, celebrate the talent, work and love of mothers around the world by giving your mom Fair Trade certified gifts.  When you buy Fair Trade, you help empower women across the globe and in your own backyard by ensuring a better life, safer working conditions, economic empowerment, access to education, and improved health and safety, including paid maternity leave and prohibiting sexual harassment  for women around the world. Need some ideas?  Not sure where to look?  Look no further! Well, we've got some fabulous ideas for you!  And you know what makes them EVEN BETTER?  All of these fabulous Fair Trade businesses are LOCAL too!! How great is that?!? logo-dolma1. Scarves, handbags, table linens or stationary from Dolma, fair trade and handmade Dolma is a Vermont based, socially responsible company that specializes in fair trade personal accessories and home décor handmade by economically disadvantaged communities in India. In addition to abiding by fair trade principles of fair wages, women’s empowerment and environmental responsibility, they donate 15% of their profits to schools for children in need. They are a proud member of the Fair Trade Federation. Dolma products can be found at the Peace & Justice Center on the Burlington waterfront, www.pjcvt.org AND at Revolution in White River Junction www.shoptherev.com 2. Jewelry, accessories, pressed flower greeting cards and ReStyle recycled tire tube bags from Hope For Women! hope-for-womenHope For Women is a Burlington., Vt based company that brings premium quality, Fair Trade products created by women artisans to the mainstream marketplace. They are a socially responsible organization committed to providing sustainable employment for economically disadvantaged women worldwide.They offer unique and beautiful products exclusively made by women so they can take control of their lives and their futures. Hope For Women is a proud member of the Fair Trade Federation. Every woman is paid a fair, livable wage under safe and healthy working conditions. Click here to find Hope For Women products in a Vermont store near you! http://www.hopeforwomen.com/lifestyle/locator/vermont/ 3. Hand made and hand woven textiles and accessories by Creative Woman Crecreative-womenative Woman is a Vermont-based, women-owned company, that works in partnership with textile studios in Ethiopia, Swaziland, Afghanistan, Senegal, Mali, Bolivia, Peru, and now India. They import traditionally-inspired contemporary accessories and home textiles. More than just designing and selling textiles, Creative Women works to promote equitable trading practices and to support women’s economic independence. As a member of the Fair Trade Federation, they believe that beautiful things are more beautiful when the people who make them are paid well and work in a safe environment. To find their products in a store near you and online, click here. 4. A wonderful variety of artisan roasted coffees and exotic teas  from Vermont Artisan Coffee & Tea Co. artisan-coffeeMany of Vermont Artisan Coffee’s offerings are certified Organic and Fair Trade. They offer a variety of the finest Arabica coffees from which to choose. They strongly believe in sustainable business practices. Whether it is collaborating with farmers on best coffee growing practices, offering chemical-free, naturally processed decafs, or selecting eco-friendly packaging, they are in it for the long haul. They also believe in Local First. Although coffee isn’t grown here in Vermont, they purchase all their other needs as close to home as possible and embrace their local community by donating weekly to their local food shelf, supporting local fund drives with product and services, working with their local high school for employment outreach, and gifting all compostable materials to local farmers and more. You can find Vermont Artisanal Coffee & Tea products at many local grocery stores, including City Market and Healthy Living, in the Burlington area and online at http://www.vtartisan.com 5. A handmade mug, upcycled home accessories, foods, books, cards and more at the Peace and Justice Center peace-and-justiceThe Peace & Justice Center is a Vermont-based non-profit, membership organization. Their mission is to create a just and peaceful world. They work on the interconnected issues of economic and racial justice, peace, and human rights through education, advocacy, training, non-violent activism and community organizing. As a unique, socially responsible non-profit, they strive for economic justice both in the Vermont community and globally.  Their retail store is a treat for the sense, featuring Fair Trade products from small artisan producers in more than 35 countries across Africa, Latin America, Asia and the Middle East.  They also work to support our local economy by carrying products from local artists, farmers, and companies, as well!  Stop by their Burlington waterfront store or visit them online at http://www.pjcvt.org This Mother's Day, celebrate your mom by supporting women everywhere with beautiful, functional, handcrafted Fair Trade gifts provided by local Vermont businesses! Do know of other Vermont businesses who are dedicated to supporting and providing Fair Trade products to our local community?  Let us know at lara@localvoretoday.com!]]>
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Celebrate Community! Celebrate World Fair Trade Day! This Saturday, May 11th from 11:00am-1:00pm in City Hall Park https://www.localvoretoday.com/2013/05/09/celebrate-world-fair-trade-day-this-saturday/ https://www.localvoretoday.com/2013/05/09/celebrate-world-fair-trade-day-this-saturday/#comments Thu, 09 May 2013 13:00:21 +0000 https://www.localvoretoday.com/?p=54783 wftd-2013-poster

wftd-2013-poster"Every business transaction is a challenge to see that both parties come out fairly."  Adam Smith, 1759 Adam Smith's comment rings true, whether you are buying local products or imported ones.  Either way, every producer deserves respect, a livable wage and fair compensation for their efforts. This Saturday, the Peace & Justice Center and Fair Trade Burlington Network will join over 100,000 people across the U.S., around the world, and right here is Burlington, to celebrate World Fair Trade Day.  It's a day dedicated to raising awareness of the importance of Fair Trade and celebrate ways to empower marginalized producers.  The fair trade movement aims at making trade fair for small producers in developing countries, support sustainable development, changes in corporate behaviors and changes in international trade policies.  World Fair Trade Day is the largest fair trade event in North America each year. Supporters in more than 80 countries worldwide will pause to celebrate the meaning of Fair Trade. Fair Trade seeks dignity and hope for farmers and artisans who produce the items we consume and enjoy, a better future for our planet, and tastier, higher quality products for you. The Day's Festivities Include:
  • Free samples from Ben & Jerry's fair trade ice cream!
  • Beautiful fair trade crafts from the Peace & Justice Store, Dolma, and many other venders
  • An exclusive kids tent with lots of fun activities
  • Drumming by Jeh Kulu
  • Tea from RUNA
  • Educational workshops with fair trade representatives
  • Fair Trade silent auction
  • Shopping at the weekly Farmers Market!
In August 2009, Burlington, Vt became the 12th Fair Trade Town in the U.S. The Burlington Fair Trade Network is dedicated to supporting local fair trade businesses, promoting social awareness and providing educational materials. Come to City Hall Park and help us support Fair Trade and deepen our commitment to Buy Fair and Buy Local! For more information, visit http://fairtradeburlington.wordpress.com  ]]>
wftd-2013-poster

wftd-2013-poster"Every business transaction is a challenge to see that both parties come out fairly."  Adam Smith, 1759 Adam Smith's comment rings true, whether you are buying local products or imported ones.  Either way, every producer deserves respect, a livable wage and fair compensation for their efforts. This Saturday, the Peace & Justice Center and Fair Trade Burlington Network will join over 100,000 people across the U.S., around the world, and right here is Burlington, to celebrate World Fair Trade Day.  It's a day dedicated to raising awareness of the importance of Fair Trade and celebrate ways to empower marginalized producers.  The fair trade movement aims at making trade fair for small producers in developing countries, support sustainable development, changes in corporate behaviors and changes in international trade policies.  World Fair Trade Day is the largest fair trade event in North America each year. Supporters in more than 80 countries worldwide will pause to celebrate the meaning of Fair Trade. Fair Trade seeks dignity and hope for farmers and artisans who produce the items we consume and enjoy, a better future for our planet, and tastier, higher quality products for you. The Day's Festivities Include:
  • Free samples from Ben & Jerry's fair trade ice cream!
  • Beautiful fair trade crafts from the Peace & Justice Store, Dolma, and many other venders
  • An exclusive kids tent with lots of fun activities
  • Drumming by Jeh Kulu
  • Tea from RUNA
  • Educational workshops with fair trade representatives
  • Fair Trade silent auction
  • Shopping at the weekly Farmers Market!
In August 2009, Burlington, Vt became the 12th Fair Trade Town in the U.S. The Burlington Fair Trade Network is dedicated to supporting local fair trade businesses, promoting social awareness and providing educational materials. Come to City Hall Park and help us support Fair Trade and deepen our commitment to Buy Fair and Buy Local! For more information, visit http://fairtradeburlington.wordpress.com  ]]>
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Get Set for Green Up Day! https://www.localvoretoday.com/2013/05/03/get-set-for-green-up-day/ https://www.localvoretoday.com/2013/05/03/get-set-for-green-up-day/#comments Fri, 03 May 2013 13:10:44 +0000 https://www.localvoretoday.com/?p=53610 “What can I do?”  you ask.  You can participate in Green Up Day, tomorrow, Saturday May 4th! Green Up Day, organized by Green Up Vermont,  is a statewide event that promotes stewardship of our state’s natural landscape and improves the livability of our community by motivating and organizing community members to pick up liter and spruce up their neighborhoods. Green Up Day is a great way to bring volunteers of all ages together to clean up Vermont’s parks, streets, waterways and public lands.  It also provides a great opportunity for us to connect to our neighbors and to the land we call home. http://youtu.be/G0oo0Ilr-_s Ready to help?  Visit the Green Up Vermont website or call 802-229-4586 for contact information for your local Green Up Day coordinator or to make a donation.  Each town has several designated meeting spots for volunteers to pick up empty trash bags, find out what areas need the most help and where to leave their full trash bags for pick-up. According to Green Up Vermont’s website, on the first Green Up Day, in 1970,  70,000 Vermonters hit the roads and collected four thousand truckloads of trash from the Interstate and other state road ways! As we deeply understand here at Localvore Today, there is a lot of power in community!  Working as a team, we can make a drastic improvement in our environment in just one day.  We’ll see you out there! For more information, visit Green Up Vermont or call 802-229-4586.]]> The sun is out, the temperatures have risen and flowers and buds are ready to explode!  Mother Nature is doing her part to beautify our state, now it’s OUR turn!!

“What can I do?”  you ask.  You can participate in Green Up Day, tomorrow, Saturday May 4th!

Green Up Day, organized by Green Up Vermont,  is a statewide event that promotes stewardship of our state’s natural landscape and improves the livability of our community by motivating and organizing community members to pick up liter and spruce up their neighborhoods. Green Up Day is a great way to bring volunteers of all ages together to clean up Vermont’s parks, streets, waterways and public lands.  It also provides a great opportunity for us to connect to our neighbors and to the land we call home.

Ready to help?  Visit the Green Up Vermont website or call 802-229-4586 for contact information for your local Green Up Day coordinator or to make a donation.  Each town has several designated meeting spots for volunteers to pick up empty trash bags, find out what areas need the most help and where to leave their full trash bags for pick-up.

According to Green Up Vermont’s website, on the first Green Up Day, in 1970,  70,000 Vermonters hit the roads and collected four thousand truckloads of trash from the Interstate and other state road ways!

As we deeply understand here at Localvore Today, there is a lot of power in community!  Working as a team, we can make a drastic improvement in our environment in just one day.  We’ll see you out there!

For more information, visit Green Up Vermont or call 802-229-4586.

The sun is out, the temperatures have risen and flowers and buds are ready to explode!  Mother Nature is doing her part to beautify our state, now it’s OUR turn!! “What can I do?”  you ask.  You can participate in Green Up Day, tomorrow, Saturday May 4th! Green Up Day, organized by Green Up Vermont,  is a statewide event that promotes stewardship of our state’s natural landscape and improves the livability of our community by motivating and organizing community members to pick up liter and spruce up their neighborhoods. Green Up Day is a great way to bring volunteers of all ages together to clean up Vermont’s parks, streets, waterways and public lands.  It also provides a great opportunity for us to connect to our neighbors and to the land we call home. http://youtu.be/G0oo0Ilr-_s Ready to help?  Visit the Green Up Vermont website or call 802-229-4586 for contact information for your local Green Up Day coordinator or to make a donation.  Each town has several designated meeting spots for volunteers to pick up empty trash bags, find out what areas need the most help and where to leave their full trash bags for pick-up. According to Green Up Vermont’s website, on the first Green Up Day, in 1970,  70,000 Vermonters hit the roads and collected four thousand truckloads of trash from the Interstate and other state road ways! As we deeply understand here at Localvore Today, there is a lot of power in community!  Working as a team, we can make a drastic improvement in our environment in just one day.  We’ll see you out there! For more information, visit Green Up Vermont or call 802-229-4586.]]>
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Think Green! 5 Easy tips to help you save energy AND money, today! https://www.localvoretoday.com/2013/04/30/think-green-5-easy-tips-to-help-start-saving-energy-and-money-today/ https://www.localvoretoday.com/2013/04/30/think-green-5-easy-tips-to-help-start-saving-energy-and-money-today/#comments Tue, 30 Apr 2013 17:54:40 +0000 https://www.localvoretoday.com/?p=53174 5 steps to save energy in your home:
  1. Know your motives.  Ask yourself why you care about saving energy.  Is it out of concern for the environment? Do you want to get off fossil fuel? Do you want to save money or reclaim that cold corner bedroom?  Your motives will determine your actions. Make a mental list of what’s important to you.  Knowing the reason(s) you are acting will help you make choices and set priorities as you work through your project budget and allotted time.
  2. Decide on a budget.  If your home is already pretty comfortable, you may be able to get away with no-to-low cost solutions.  If you have cold rooms or big icicles, you will need to write some checks.  You budget doesn’t need to be specific, just think in terms of zero, a little, or an investment that rivals your retirement plan for performance. Many home energy upgrades will actually pay you better returns than mutual fund investments!
  3. Upgrade your lights.  No matter how you answered in steps 1 and 2, changing out your old lightbulbs will help you reach your goal and can be done today!  Don’t wait for your old, incandescent lights to die.  Yank them out like weeds in a flower bed. They are sucking up more energy than they deserve.  Skip right over the CFLs and install long lasting LED bulbs instead.  LEDs cost a little more upfront but they provide good light and will end up saving you money over the long run.  Plus, most LEDs are dim-able and contain NO mercury.  Make sure you match the light output of your new lights to your old ones.
  4. Be your own energy management system.  You don’t need to get fancy.  Act conscientiously and the savings will follow.  Turn off lights when not in use. Adjust the thermostat now that the days are warmer.  Put the entire entertainment system on a power strip you turn off when you aren’t using it. Add a similar power strip to your computer workstation and all its gadgets.  Turn down your water heater; hot enough for a shower is hot enough.  If you are forgetful, timers, motion sensors and programmable thermostats will help if you take the time to set them up properly.
  5. Consult an expert. Ready to save big?  Making sensible investments in your home’s energy systems is a daunting process of evaluating priorities to boost performance while keeping you and your surroundings safe.  Don’t just lay out money for an “energy audit.” Make sure you are speaking with an expert who isn’t tied to selling equipment or insulation, but is ready to help you sort through the entire process of choosing the right solutions, finding a qualified contractor and inspecting the improvement for completeness.
For more information visit the energy efficiency experts at Shelter Analytics at shelteranalytics.com]]>
Cold winter weather may be a thing of the past but chances are, you still haven’t shaken off the last of its chills.  With high energy bills and your home’s drafty corners fresh in your mind, Spring is the perfect time to reassess your home’s energy efficiency and make some meaningful improvements.  Our friends at Shelter Analytics, the true energy efficiency experts, have some easy  tips that will  help you green up your home, save energy and keep a little extra green in your pocket, too!

5 steps to save energy in your home:

  1. Know your motives.  Ask yourself why you care about saving energy.  Is it out of concern for the environment? Do you want to get off fossil fuel? Do you want to save money or reclaim that cold corner bedroom?  Your motives will determine your actions. Make a mental list of what’s important to you.  Knowing the reason(s) you are acting will help you make choices and set priorities as you work through your project budget and allotted time.
  2. Decide on a budget.  If your home is already pretty comfortable, you may be able to get away with no-to-low cost solutions.  If you have cold rooms or big icicles, you will need to write some checks.  You budget doesn’t need to be specific, just think in terms of zero, a little, or an investment that rivals your retirement plan for performance. Many home energy upgrades will actually pay you better returns than mutual fund investments!
  3. Upgrade your lights.  No matter how you answered in steps 1 and 2, changing out your old lightbulbs will help you reach your goal and can be done today!  Don’t wait for your old, incandescent lights to die.  Yank them out like weeds in a flower bed. They are sucking up more energy than they deserve.  Skip right over the CFLs and install long lasting LED bulbs instead.  LEDs cost a little more upfront but they provide good light and will end up saving you money over the long run.  Plus, most LEDs are dim-able and contain NO mercury.  Make sure you match the light output of your new lights to your old ones.
  4. Be your own energy management system.  You don’t need to get fancy.  Act conscientiously and the savings will follow.  Turn off lights when not in use. Adjust the thermostat now that the days are warmer.  Put the entire entertainment system on a power strip you turn off when you aren’t using it. Add a similar power strip to your computer workstation and all its gadgets.  Turn down your water heater; hot enough for a shower is hot enough.  If you are forgetful, timers, motion sensors and programmable thermostats will help if you take the time to set them up properly.
  5. Consult an expert. Ready to save big?  Making sensible investments in your home’s energy systems is a daunting process of evaluating priorities to boost performance while keeping you and your surroundings safe.  Don’t just lay out money for an “energy audit.” Make sure you are speaking with an expert who isn’t tied to selling equipment or insulation, but is ready to help you sort through the entire process of choosing the right solutions, finding a qualified contractor and inspecting the improvement for completeness.

For more information visit the energy efficiency experts at Shelter Analytics at shelteranalytics.com

Cold winter weather may be a thing of the past but chances are, you still haven’t shaken off the last of its chills.  With high energy bills and your home’s drafty corners fresh in your mind, Spring is the perfect time to reassess your home’s energy efficiency and make some meaningful improvements.  Our friends at Shelter Analytics, the true energy efficiency experts, have some easy  tips that will  help you green up your home, save energy and keep a little extra green in your pocket, too! 5 steps to save energy in your home:
  1. Know your motives.  Ask yourself why you care about saving energy.  Is it out of concern for the environment? Do you want to get off fossil fuel? Do you want to save money or reclaim that cold corner bedroom?  Your motives will determine your actions. Make a mental list of what’s important to you.  Knowing the reason(s) you are acting will help you make choices and set priorities as you work through your project budget and allotted time.
  2. Decide on a budget.  If your home is already pretty comfortable, you may be able to get away with no-to-low cost solutions.  If you have cold rooms or big icicles, you will need to write some checks.  You budget doesn’t need to be specific, just think in terms of zero, a little, or an investment that rivals your retirement plan for performance. Many home energy upgrades will actually pay you better returns than mutual fund investments!
  3. Upgrade your lights.  No matter how you answered in steps 1 and 2, changing out your old lightbulbs will help you reach your goal and can be done today!  Don’t wait for your old, incandescent lights to die.  Yank them out like weeds in a flower bed. They are sucking up more energy than they deserve.  Skip right over the CFLs and install long lasting LED bulbs instead.  LEDs cost a little more upfront but they provide good light and will end up saving you money over the long run.  Plus, most LEDs are dim-able and contain NO mercury.  Make sure you match the light output of your new lights to your old ones.
  4. Be your own energy management system.  You don’t need to get fancy.  Act conscientiously and the savings will follow.  Turn off lights when not in use. Adjust the thermostat now that the days are warmer.  Put the entire entertainment system on a power strip you turn off when you aren’t using it. Add a similar power strip to your computer workstation and all its gadgets.  Turn down your water heater; hot enough for a shower is hot enough.  If you are forgetful, timers, motion sensors and programmable thermostats will help if you take the time to set them up properly.
  5. Consult an expert. Ready to save big?  Making sensible investments in your home’s energy systems is a daunting process of evaluating priorities to boost performance while keeping you and your surroundings safe.  Don’t just lay out money for an “energy audit.” Make sure you are speaking with an expert who isn’t tied to selling equipment or insulation, but is ready to help you sort through the entire process of choosing the right solutions, finding a qualified contractor and inspecting the improvement for completeness.
For more information visit the energy efficiency experts at Shelter Analytics at shelteranalytics.com]]>
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Localvore Today Joins 1% for the Planet https://www.localvoretoday.com/2013/04/22/localvore-today-joins-1-for-the-planet/ https://www.localvoretoday.com/2013/04/22/localvore-today-joins-1-for-the-planet/#comments Mon, 22 Apr 2013 13:52:26 +0000 https://www.localvoretoday.com/?p=50798 localvores-love-blueHappy Earth Day, Localvores! On this special day, we’re excited to announce our decision to join 1% for the Planet -- an organization dedicated to the mission of "keeping Earth in business." As a member of 1% for the Planet, Localvore Today is committed to giving 1% of our sales to a network of Vermont non-profit organizations dedicated to protecting our big blue planet. ”Signing on to 1% for the Planet shows Localvore Today has a strong commitment to investing in sustainability efforts,” says Terry Kellogg, CEO. “They're using business as a tool to engage and motivate their stakeholders while partnering with environmental organizations that complement their brand. We're excited to welcome Localvore Today to our global network." At Localvore Today, our primary focus is harnessing the power of community buying to build a more economically sustainable future in Vermont and beyond.  It is undeniably clear that the economy and the environment go hand in hand, which is why we are committed to putting the spotlight on the environment, and why we’re giving 1% of our sales to Vermont non-profits focused on creating a more environmentally sustainable future. Members of 1% for the Planet contribute one percent of annual sales directly to any of the approved non-profit environmental organizations in the network.  Non-profits are approved based on referrals, track record and sustainability focus. Over 3,000 non-profits worldwide are currently approved. You can browse the approved non-profits on the 1% for the Planet website here. Because we are a locally grown Vermont business, and because Vermont is the plot of this big blue planet we all call home, we are committed to donating 1% to approved non-profits in Vermont. You can see a full list of those non-profits here. “As we near our 10th anniversary, we’re celebrating that our members have contributed nearly $100 million of critically needed funds,” comments Kellogg. “The understanding that brands can succeed financially by investing in the environment is clearly apparent, and consumer demand is driving a lot of this success. The average annual revenue growth of the companies in the 1% for the Planet network from 2008 to 2011 was over 50%, even though the overall economy has been struggling. There’s a paradigm shift happening here and we’re thrilled that so many innovative businesses are sling-shotting the movement in to high gear.” Headquartered in Waitsfield VT, 1% for the Planet has launched a regional focus on New England to increase giving in the region. “The momentum is palpable” says Barbara Friedsam, 1% for the Planet’s New England Network Director. “The New England network will not only continue to prove that the model works but will lead the charge with increased collaboration among all stakeholders.”   About 1% for the Planet Started in 2002 by Yvon Chouinard, founder of Patagonia, and Craig Mathews, owner of Blue Ribbon Flies, 1% for the Planet is a platform of credibility and engagement for environmentally conscious brands that are truly committed to making a positive impact with their business. This growing global movement of over 1,450 member companies in 45 countries donate one percent of annual sales to environmental organizations worldwide. To learn more go to: www.onepercentfortheplanet.org.]]> localvores-love-blueHappy Earth Day, Localvores! On this special day, we’re excited to announce our decision to join 1% for the Planet – an organization dedicated to the mission of “keeping Earth in business.”

As a member of 1% for the Planet, Localvore Today is committed to giving 1% of our sales to a network of Vermont non-profit organizations dedicated to protecting our big blue planet.

”Signing on to 1% for the Planet shows Localvore Today has a strong commitment to investing in sustainability efforts,” says Terry Kellogg, CEO. “They’re using business as a tool to engage and motivate their stakeholders while partnering with environmental organizations that complement their brand. We’re excited to welcome Localvore Today to our global network.”

At Localvore Today, our primary focus is harnessing the power of community buying to build a more economically sustainable future in Vermont and beyond.  It is undeniably clear that the economy and the environment go hand in hand, which is why we are committed to putting the spotlight on the environment, and why we’re giving 1% of our sales to Vermont non-profits focused on creating a more environmentally sustainable future.

Members of 1% for the Planet contribute one percent of annual sales directly to any of the approved non-profit environmental organizations in the network.  Non-profits are approved based on referrals, track record and sustainability focus. Over 3,000 non-profits worldwide are currently approved. You can browse the approved non-profits on the 1% for the Planet website here.

Because we are a locally grown Vermont business, and because Vermont is the plot of this big blue planet we all call home, we are committed to donating 1% to approved non-profits in Vermont. You can see a full list of those non-profits here.

“As we near our 10th anniversary, we’re celebrating that our members have contributed nearly $100 million of critically needed funds,” comments Kellogg. “The understanding that brands can succeed financially by investing in the environment is clearly apparent, and consumer demand is driving a lot of this success. The average annual revenue growth of the companies in the 1% for the Planet network from 2008 to 2011 was over 50%, even though the overall economy has been struggling. There’s a paradigm shift happening here and we’re thrilled that so many innovative businesses are sling-shotting the movement in to high gear.”

Headquartered in Waitsfield VT, 1% for the Planet has launched a regional focus on New England to increase giving in the region. “The momentum is palpable” says Barbara Friedsam, 1% for the Planet’s New England Network Director. “The New England network will not only continue to prove that the model works but will lead the charge with increased collaboration among all stakeholders.”

 

About 1% for the Planet

Started in 2002 by Yvon Chouinard, founder of Patagonia, and Craig Mathews, owner of Blue Ribbon Flies, 1% for the Planet is a platform of credibility and engagement for environmentally conscious brands that are truly committed to making a positive impact with their business. This growing global movement of over 1,450 member companies in 45 countries donate one percent of annual sales to environmental organizations worldwide. To learn more go to: www.onepercentfortheplanet.org.

localvores-love-blueHappy Earth Day, Localvores! On this special day, we’re excited to announce our decision to join 1% for the Planet -- an organization dedicated to the mission of "keeping Earth in business." As a member of 1% for the Planet, Localvore Today is committed to giving 1% of our sales to a network of Vermont non-profit organizations dedicated to protecting our big blue planet. ”Signing on to 1% for the Planet shows Localvore Today has a strong commitment to investing in sustainability efforts,” says Terry Kellogg, CEO. “They're using business as a tool to engage and motivate their stakeholders while partnering with environmental organizations that complement their brand. We're excited to welcome Localvore Today to our global network." At Localvore Today, our primary focus is harnessing the power of community buying to build a more economically sustainable future in Vermont and beyond.  It is undeniably clear that the economy and the environment go hand in hand, which is why we are committed to putting the spotlight on the environment, and why we’re giving 1% of our sales to Vermont non-profits focused on creating a more environmentally sustainable future. Members of 1% for the Planet contribute one percent of annual sales directly to any of the approved non-profit environmental organizations in the network.  Non-profits are approved based on referrals, track record and sustainability focus. Over 3,000 non-profits worldwide are currently approved. You can browse the approved non-profits on the 1% for the Planet website here. Because we are a locally grown Vermont business, and because Vermont is the plot of this big blue planet we all call home, we are committed to donating 1% to approved non-profits in Vermont. You can see a full list of those non-profits here. “As we near our 10th anniversary, we’re celebrating that our members have contributed nearly $100 million of critically needed funds,” comments Kellogg. “The understanding that brands can succeed financially by investing in the environment is clearly apparent, and consumer demand is driving a lot of this success. The average annual revenue growth of the companies in the 1% for the Planet network from 2008 to 2011 was over 50%, even though the overall economy has been struggling. There’s a paradigm shift happening here and we’re thrilled that so many innovative businesses are sling-shotting the movement in to high gear.” Headquartered in Waitsfield VT, 1% for the Planet has launched a regional focus on New England to increase giving in the region. “The momentum is palpable” says Barbara Friedsam, 1% for the Planet’s New England Network Director. “The New England network will not only continue to prove that the model works but will lead the charge with increased collaboration among all stakeholders.”   About 1% for the Planet Started in 2002 by Yvon Chouinard, founder of Patagonia, and Craig Mathews, owner of Blue Ribbon Flies, 1% for the Planet is a platform of credibility and engagement for environmentally conscious brands that are truly committed to making a positive impact with their business. This growing global movement of over 1,450 member companies in 45 countries donate one percent of annual sales to environmental organizations worldwide. To learn more go to: www.onepercentfortheplanet.org.]]>
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Focus on Kids: Yoga, the Best Gift! https://www.localvoretoday.com/2013/04/10/focus-on-kids-yoga-the-best-gift/ https://www.localvoretoday.com/2013/04/10/focus-on-kids-yoga-the-best-gift/#comments Wed, 10 Apr 2013 18:03:56 +0000 https://www.localvoretoday.com/?p=48456 Yogirls! 438 Image via Mountain Kids Yoga[/caption] Having a hard time picturing your 3 year old son laying still in Shavasana?  Not sure why you would want to PAY for your daughter to pretend to be a snake in Bhjangasana or a lion in Simhasana when she does that all day long at home for free?  Well, yoga for kids may teach your kids a whole lot more than you think!  Learning to explore the world through their bodies, kids derive tremendous benefits from practicing yoga at an early age.  Not only does regular yoga practice promote the physical benefits of increased strength, coordination and flexibility; but yoga also teaches important techniques for self-health such as relaxation, body awareness, impulse management and emotional growth. "Kids today often live very stressful and busy lives," says Kay Balcziunas, MSN, a psychotherapist specializing in children, adolescents and families at Pathways to Well Being in Burlilngton, Vt.  Academic expectations, social pressures, competitive sports, incessant lessons and even life shared with busy parents and a constant stream of electronic information can have a profound effect on our children, filling their lives, heads and bodies with constant pressure and noise. "It's amazing how many clients I see, toddlers through high school seniors, who are experiencing some form of anxiety on a constant basis," says Balcziunas.  "It's not that kids need to avoid all of these activities," she says "but instead, they need to be taught how to process and let go of all of those stresses in a positive and healthy way--learn to also be still and learn how to listen to how they are feeling and what to do with those feelings." [caption id="attachment_48466" align="alignleft" width="240"]kidsyoga Image via Mountain Kids Yoga[/caption] Hello yoga!  Yoga for kids can help counter these pressures, encourage positive self-esteem and body awareness all while wrapping these essential life skills in play and movement. Far from forcing kids to master complicated poses or work through difficult vinyasas,which can be challenging and immensely fun and rewarding for adults, most kids yoga classes intermix poses with creative expression, exploration and movement. Yoga poses, most of which are modeled and named after animals, help children get in touch with their bodies by stretching like a cat that's been sleeping in the sun all afternoon (Marjaryasana), finding the pride and strength of a cobra (Balasana), and tapping into the power and strength of a warrior (Virabhadrasana I).  Kids yoga enhances confidence, promotes calm and infuses balance. "I recommend yoga to almost all of my clients," says Balcziunas. "Even learning how to breathe, really breathe, is a tremendously useful skill," she says.  "What better gift can we give our kids than that?" To learn more about Kay Balcziunas and her practice, click here. Ready to give kids yoga a try?  Check out the amazing offer for two classes for the price of one at Mountain Kids Yoga! Does your child practice yoga?  If so, we want to hear from you!  Where do you take classes?  What's her favorite pose?  What has he or she learned? Tell us in the comments!]]> Yogirls! 438

Image via Mountain Kids Yoga

Having a hard time picturing your 3 year old son laying still in Shavasana?  Not sure why you would want to PAY for your daughter to pretend to be a snake in Bhjangasana or a lion in Simhasana when she does that all day long at home for free?  Well, yoga for kids may teach your kids a whole lot more than you think!  Learning to explore the world through their bodies, kids derive tremendous benefits from practicing yoga at an early age.  Not only does regular yoga practice promote the physical benefits of increased strength, coordination and flexibility; but yoga also teaches important techniques for self-health such as relaxation, body awareness, impulse management and emotional growth.

“Kids today often live very stressful and busy lives,” says Kay Balcziunas, MSN, a psychotherapist specializing in children, adolescents and families at Pathways to Well Being in Burlilngton, Vt.  Academic expectations, social pressures, competitive sports, incessant lessons and even life shared with busy parents and a constant stream of electronic information can have a profound effect on our children, filling their lives, heads and bodies with constant pressure and noise.

“It’s amazing how many clients I see, toddlers through high school seniors, who are experiencing some form of anxiety on a constant basis,” says Balcziunas.  “It’s not that kids need to avoid all of these activities,” she says “but instead, they need to be taught how to process and let go of all of those stresses in a positive and healthy way–learn to also be still and learn how to listen to how they are feeling and what to do with those feelings.”

kidsyoga

Image via Mountain Kids Yoga

Hello yoga!  Yoga for kids can help counter these pressures, encourage positive self-esteem and body awareness all while wrapping these essential life skills in play and movement. Far from forcing kids to master complicated poses or work through difficult vinyasas,which can be challenging and immensely fun and rewarding for adults, most kids yoga classes intermix poses with creative expression, exploration and movement.

Yoga poses, most of which are modeled and named after animals, help children get in touch with their bodies by stretching like a cat that’s been sleeping in the sun all afternoon (Marjaryasana), finding the pride and strength of a cobra (Balasana), and tapping into the power and strength of a warrior (Virabhadrasana I).  Kids yoga enhances confidence, promotes calm and infuses balance.

“I recommend yoga to almost all of my clients,” says Balcziunas. “Even learning how to breathe, really breathe, is a tremendously useful skill,” she says.  “What better gift can we give our kids than that?”

To learn more about Kay Balcziunas and her practice, click here. Ready to give kids yoga a try?  Check out the amazing offer for two classes for the price of one at Mountain Kids Yoga!

Does your child practice yoga?  If so, we want to hear from you!  Where do you take classes?  What’s her favorite pose?  What has he or she learned? Tell us in the comments!

[caption id="attachment_48465" align="alignright" width="269"]Yogirls! 438 Image via Mountain Kids Yoga[/caption] Having a hard time picturing your 3 year old son laying still in Shavasana?  Not sure why you would want to PAY for your daughter to pretend to be a snake in Bhjangasana or a lion in Simhasana when she does that all day long at home for free?  Well, yoga for kids may teach your kids a whole lot more than you think!  Learning to explore the world through their bodies, kids derive tremendous benefits from practicing yoga at an early age.  Not only does regular yoga practice promote the physical benefits of increased strength, coordination and flexibility; but yoga also teaches important techniques for self-health such as relaxation, body awareness, impulse management and emotional growth. "Kids today often live very stressful and busy lives," says Kay Balcziunas, MSN, a psychotherapist specializing in children, adolescents and families at Pathways to Well Being in Burlilngton, Vt.  Academic expectations, social pressures, competitive sports, incessant lessons and even life shared with busy parents and a constant stream of electronic information can have a profound effect on our children, filling their lives, heads and bodies with constant pressure and noise. "It's amazing how many clients I see, toddlers through high school seniors, who are experiencing some form of anxiety on a constant basis," says Balcziunas.  "It's not that kids need to avoid all of these activities," she says "but instead, they need to be taught how to process and let go of all of those stresses in a positive and healthy way--learn to also be still and learn how to listen to how they are feeling and what to do with those feelings." [caption id="attachment_48466" align="alignleft" width="240"]kidsyoga Image via Mountain Kids Yoga[/caption] Hello yoga!  Yoga for kids can help counter these pressures, encourage positive self-esteem and body awareness all while wrapping these essential life skills in play and movement. Far from forcing kids to master complicated poses or work through difficult vinyasas,which can be challenging and immensely fun and rewarding for adults, most kids yoga classes intermix poses with creative expression, exploration and movement. Yoga poses, most of which are modeled and named after animals, help children get in touch with their bodies by stretching like a cat that's been sleeping in the sun all afternoon (Marjaryasana), finding the pride and strength of a cobra (Balasana), and tapping into the power and strength of a warrior (Virabhadrasana I).  Kids yoga enhances confidence, promotes calm and infuses balance. "I recommend yoga to almost all of my clients," says Balcziunas. "Even learning how to breathe, really breathe, is a tremendously useful skill," she says.  "What better gift can we give our kids than that?" To learn more about Kay Balcziunas and her practice, click here. Ready to give kids yoga a try?  Check out the amazing offer for two classes for the price of one at Mountain Kids Yoga! Does your child practice yoga?  If so, we want to hear from you!  Where do you take classes?  What's her favorite pose?  What has he or she learned? Tell us in the comments!]]>
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Us & Them https://www.localvoretoday.com/2013/04/04/us-them/ https://www.localvoretoday.com/2013/04/04/us-them/#comments Thu, 04 Apr 2013 14:07:27 +0000 https://www.localvoretoday.com/?p=47266 1.4  billion dollars flows out of local economies into two corporate headquarters. Groupon and Living Social have 70% of the 2 billion dollar domestic "Daily Deal" market. Many of these businesses are local shops. The pizza place down the street, the salon on the corner. On average offers are purchased within a 2.3 mile radius of the storefront. This doesn't make sense to us. Buying local should  support the local economy where the purchase is made. Buying local does these things: Small farmers can keep their farms operational instead of shutting down and selling to developers. Most people who work in local businesses live locally. By buying from these places, you help your neighbors keep their jobs and that benefits your whole community. A  2002 study done in Texas showed that for every $100 that was spent in a national chain bookstore, only $8 of it was put back into the local economy. But that same $100 spent at a local, independently owned bookstore put $28-41 back into the local economy. Local businesses give back locally. Do you know who sponsors the little league and softball teams in your town? So while we love running offers for awesome businesses and enjoy sending Vermonters to have great experiences while saving money, we also have a mission to close the economic loop on this service. THEM We have three main competitors here in Vermont: Living Social: Living Social is owned by Amazon (this is the same company who has an app that lets you scan bar codes in local stores and buy it cheaper online). Not only is Amazon.com bad for local business - they are not very nice corporate citizens. Tax dodging, Union busting, privacy selling.  If my grandmother were here I would not be able to say anything because I have nothing nice to say about them. JumpOnIt: WCAX is a local company - we will totally give them props for that - they run ads on TV alllll the time exclaiming why its important to buy local. Their JumpOnIt product is run by Analog Analytics though - which is owned by Barclays Global Financial Services, which is a British Multi-national headquartered in London. So yeah…next time they talk about the importance of buying local maybe they should speak with an accent. Jumponit is just an additional revenue stream for WCAX, routed from your wallet, to California, to London, to God knows where, then a small percentage of it gets back to the place next door where you went last week with your JumpOnIt. It's like you are jumping on the wallet of the community and the money is flying out from under your feet and going to London to be invested in who knows what. Deal Chicken: I swear there must have been a meeting at Gannett headquarters where the big wigs were talking about how to get in on all this daily deal money going around, and someone - as a joke - said we should call it Deal Chicken - then someone else - as a joke - said "Hatching Deals Daily" and then some corporate clone said... "Wait... I like that..." Why would a chicken hatch deals? We do not know the answer to this joke, but we know a joke when we see one. Gannett Company, Inc. is a publicly traded media holding company headquartered in Tysons Corner, Virginia, near McLean. I actually worked at the Free Press years ago in researching my novel "Copy Boy" which never saw the light of day. I never once heard the phrase "is this good for the business" once in my tenure there. Mostly I heard the sales reps congratulate each other when they sold big ad packages to new businesses. The culture was to sell ad space. That was what they were trained to do - they talked about the benefits to the business when out selling - but in the sales office it was all about them selling packages. Once I realized my novel was flawed I left that place. US When I first met the co-founder Dan the first thing out of my mouth was: "This is a small town, I know many business owners personally and this has to be able to work for them because I do not want to be dis-invited to parties these people throw." He smiled and explained that my concern was the reason for pursuing this idea. He said it can work for businesses very well, you just have to keep the merchants best interest in mind. At Localvore Today we ask ourselves this question again and again: "How can we help the businesses we work with grow?" Our team has retail, restaurant and service industry experience, as well as marketing expertise. Our whole idea is that - if we help the local economy flourish - we will be able to grow our business in the process. It's a big idea and a simple idea -- an idea that we feel can make a significant impact on our local community as we grow.

Michael Chief Technologist and Localvore

]]>
We started Localvore Today for a few different reasons. One of the most important is that every year 1.4  billion dollars flows out of local economies into two corporate headquarters. Groupon and Living Social have 70% of the 2 billion dollar domestic “Daily Deal” market. Many of these businesses are local shops. The pizza place down the street, the salon on the corner. On average offers are purchased within a 2.3 mile radius of the storefront.

This doesn’t make sense to us. Buying local should  support the local economy where the purchase is made.

Buying local does these things:

Small farmers can keep their farms operational instead of shutting down and selling to developers.

Most people who work in local businesses live locally. By buying from these places, you help your neighbors keep their jobs and that benefits your whole community.

2002 study done in Texas showed that for every $100 that was spent in a national chain bookstore, only $8 of it was put back into the local economy. But that same $100 spent at a local, independently owned bookstore put $28-41 back into the local economy.

Local businesses give back locally. Do you know who sponsors the little league and softball teams in your town?

So while we love running offers for awesome businesses and enjoy sending Vermonters to have great experiences while saving money, we also have a mission to close the economic loop on this service.

THEM

We have three main competitors here in Vermont:

Living Social: Living Social is owned by Amazon (this is the same company who has an app that lets you scan bar codes in local stores and buy it cheaper online). Not only is Amazon.com bad for local business – they are not very nice corporate citizens. Tax dodging, Union busting, privacy selling.  If my grandmother were here I would not be able to say anything because I have nothing nice to say about them.

JumpOnIt: WCAX is a local company – we will totally give them props for that – they run ads on TV alllll the time exclaiming why its important to buy local. Their JumpOnIt product is run by Analog Analytics though – which is owned by Barclays Global Financial Services, which is a British Multi-national headquartered in London. So yeah…next time they talk about the importance of buying local maybe they should speak with an accent.

Jumponit is just an additional revenue stream for WCAX, routed from your wallet, to California, to London, to God knows where, then a small percentage of it gets back to the place next door where you went last week with your JumpOnIt.

It’s like you are jumping on the wallet of the community and the money is flying out from under your feet and going to London to be invested in who knows what.

Deal Chicken: I swear there must have been a meeting at Gannett headquarters where the big wigs were talking about how to get in on all this daily deal money going around, and someone - as a joke – said we should call it Deal Chicken – then someone else – as a joke – said “Hatching Deals Daily” and then some corporate clone said… “Wait… I like that…”

Why would a chicken hatch deals?

We do not know the answer to this joke, but we know a joke when we see one.

Gannett Company, Inc. is a publicly traded media holding company headquartered in Tysons Corner, Virginia, near McLean.

I actually worked at the Free Press years ago in researching my novel “Copy Boy” which never saw the light of day.

I never once heard the phrase “is this good for the business” once in my tenure there. Mostly I heard the sales reps congratulate each other when they sold big ad packages to new businesses. The culture was to sell ad space. That was what they were trained to do – they talked about the benefits to the business when out selling – but in the sales office it was all about them selling packages. Once I realized my novel was flawed I left that place.

US

When I first met the co-founder Dan the first thing out of my mouth was: “This is a small town, I know many business owners personally and this has to be able to work for them because I do not want to be dis-invited to parties these people throw.” He smiled and explained that my concern was the reason for pursuing this idea. He said it can work for businesses very well, you just have to keep the merchants best interest in mind.

At Localvore Today we ask ourselves this question again and again: “How can we help the businesses we work with grow?” Our team has retail, restaurant and service industry experience, as well as marketing expertise. Our whole idea is that – if we help the local economy flourish – we will be able to grow our business in the process. It’s a big idea and a simple idea — an idea that we feel can make a significant impact on our local community as we grow.

Michael
Chief Technologist and Localvore

We started Localvore Today for a few different reasons. One of the most important is that every year 1.4  billion dollars flows out of local economies into two corporate headquarters. Groupon and Living Social have 70% of the 2 billion dollar domestic "Daily Deal" market. Many of these businesses are local shops. The pizza place down the street, the salon on the corner. On average offers are purchased within a 2.3 mile radius of the storefront. This doesn't make sense to us. Buying local should  support the local economy where the purchase is made. Buying local does these things: Small farmers can keep their farms operational instead of shutting down and selling to developers. Most people who work in local businesses live locally. By buying from these places, you help your neighbors keep their jobs and that benefits your whole community. A  2002 study done in Texas showed that for every $100 that was spent in a national chain bookstore, only $8 of it was put back into the local economy. But that same $100 spent at a local, independently owned bookstore put $28-41 back into the local economy. Local businesses give back locally. Do you know who sponsors the little league and softball teams in your town? So while we love running offers for awesome businesses and enjoy sending Vermonters to have great experiences while saving money, we also have a mission to close the economic loop on this service. THEM We have three main competitors here in Vermont: Living Social: Living Social is owned by Amazon (this is the same company who has an app that lets you scan bar codes in local stores and buy it cheaper online). Not only is Amazon.com bad for local business - they are not very nice corporate citizens. Tax dodging, Union busting, privacy selling.  If my grandmother were here I would not be able to say anything because I have nothing nice to say about them. JumpOnIt: WCAX is a local company - we will totally give them props for that - they run ads on TV alllll the time exclaiming why its important to buy local. Their JumpOnIt product is run by Analog Analytics though - which is owned by Barclays Global Financial Services, which is a British Multi-national headquartered in London. So yeah…next time they talk about the importance of buying local maybe they should speak with an accent. Jumponit is just an additional revenue stream for WCAX, routed from your wallet, to California, to London, to God knows where, then a small percentage of it gets back to the place next door where you went last week with your JumpOnIt. It's like you are jumping on the wallet of the community and the money is flying out from under your feet and going to London to be invested in who knows what. Deal Chicken: I swear there must have been a meeting at Gannett headquarters where the big wigs were talking about how to get in on all this daily deal money going around, and someone - as a joke - said we should call it Deal Chicken - then someone else - as a joke - said "Hatching Deals Daily" and then some corporate clone said... "Wait... I like that..." Why would a chicken hatch deals? We do not know the answer to this joke, but we know a joke when we see one. Gannett Company, Inc. is a publicly traded media holding company headquartered in Tysons Corner, Virginia, near McLean. I actually worked at the Free Press years ago in researching my novel "Copy Boy" which never saw the light of day. I never once heard the phrase "is this good for the business" once in my tenure there. Mostly I heard the sales reps congratulate each other when they sold big ad packages to new businesses. The culture was to sell ad space. That was what they were trained to do - they talked about the benefits to the business when out selling - but in the sales office it was all about them selling packages. Once I realized my novel was flawed I left that place. US When I first met the co-founder Dan the first thing out of my mouth was: "This is a small town, I know many business owners personally and this has to be able to work for them because I do not want to be dis-invited to parties these people throw." He smiled and explained that my concern was the reason for pursuing this idea. He said it can work for businesses very well, you just have to keep the merchants best interest in mind. At Localvore Today we ask ourselves this question again and again: "How can we help the businesses we work with grow?" Our team has retail, restaurant and service industry experience, as well as marketing expertise. Our whole idea is that - if we help the local economy flourish - we will be able to grow our business in the process. It's a big idea and a simple idea -- an idea that we feel can make a significant impact on our local community as we grow.

Michael Chief Technologist and Localvore

]]>
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Bring New Life to Winter Weary Hair with Easy Tips From a Local Expert https://www.localvoretoday.com/2013/03/27/45998/ https://www.localvoretoday.com/2013/03/27/45998/#comments Wed, 27 Mar 2013 14:10:59 +0000 https://www.localvoretoday.com/?p=45998 Screen shot 2013-03-28 at 1.57.30 PM Salon Lanier on College St in Burlington![/caption] Egads! Between the dreaded hat hair to static cling, winter weather can really do a number on healthy hair.  Freezing air outside and dry heat indoors can pull a double whammy and strip moisture from your pores, resulting in rough static-y hair and a dry scalp. Well, spring has sprung and Phyllis Lowry, a local expert at  Salon Lanier, offers some simple steps you can add to your normal beauty routine that will breathe new life into your winter-weary hair. 1. Step away from the shampoo!  Yes, you read that right.  Although everyone’s hair is different, “we tend to use WAY more soap than we need,” says Lowry.  Shampooing strips moisture from the scalp and hair. Instead of washing everyday, try skipping the shampoo every other day, and simply wet hair with tepid (not hot) water and condition as usual instead. 2. Treat your hair to a cool rinse.  Yes, it’s cold outside and that warm stream of water feels oh so very nice, but hot water opens up your hair’s cuticle allowing moisture to escape.  Finishing with a cool rinse helps shut down your hair’s cuticle, locking moisture in and promoting shine. 3. Dry hair fully and finish styling with a blast of cold air from your blow dryer. Water expands when it freezes.  Going outside with damp hair in freezing weather can cause the water on your hair to expand and damage the structure of your hair. Drying your hair fully before heading outside protects your hair all the way from its root to its tip, locking moisture in and protecting its shine. 4. And for an extra treat for dry winter weary hair, Lowry recommends a dab of pure coconut oil.  Simply warm a dab of oil between your hands then apply to ends for a burst of moisture.  If your scalp is also feeling dry and itchy, work the oil into your scalp with fingertips.  Wrap hair in a warm dry towel or cling wrap from the kitchen and relax for 20 minutes.  Wash, rinse, condition and style as usual! Your hair and skin will love you! Ready to freshen up your color or style?  Call to make an appointment with Phyllis today at Salon Lanier on College St., in Burlington (802) 651-8820.]]> Screen shot 2013-03-28 at 1.57.30 PM

Salon Lanier on College St in Burlington!

Egads! Between the dreaded hat hair to static cling, winter weather can really do a number on healthy hair.  Freezing air outside and dry heat indoors can pull a double whammy and strip moisture from your pores, resulting in rough static-y hair and a dry scalp. Well, spring has sprung and Phyllis Lowry, a local expert at  Salon Lanier, offers some simple steps you can add to your normal beauty routine that will breathe new life into your winter-weary hair.

1. Step away from the shampoo!  Yes, you read that right.  Although everyone’s hair is different, “we tend to use WAY more soap than we need,” says Lowry.  Shampooing strips moisture from the scalp and hair. Instead of washing everyday, try skipping the shampoo every other day, and simply wet hair with tepid (not hot) water and condition as usual instead.

2. Treat your hair to a cool rinse.  Yes, it’s cold outside and that warm stream of water feels oh so very nice, but hot water opens up your hair’s cuticle allowing moisture to escape.  Finishing with a cool rinse helps shut down your hair’s cuticle, locking moisture in and promoting shine.

3. Dry hair fully and finish styling with a blast of cold air from your blow dryer. Water expands when it freezes.  Going outside with damp hair in freezing weather can cause the water on your hair to expand and damage the structure of your hair. Drying your hair fully before heading outside protects your hair all the way from its root to its tip, locking moisture in and protecting its shine.

4. And for an extra treat for dry winter weary hair, Lowry recommends a dab of pure coconut oil.  Simply warm a dab of oil between your hands then apply to ends for a burst of moisture.  If your scalp is also feeling dry and itchy, work the oil into your scalp with fingertips.  Wrap hair in a warm dry towel or cling wrap from the kitchen and relax for 20 minutes.  Wash, rinse, condition and style as usual!

Your hair and skin will love you!

Ready to freshen up your color or style?  Call to make an appointment with Phyllis today at Salon Lanier on College St., in Burlington (802) 651-8820.

[caption id="attachment_46169" align="alignright" width="260"]Screen shot 2013-03-28 at 1.57.30 PM Salon Lanier on College St in Burlington![/caption] Egads! Between the dreaded hat hair to static cling, winter weather can really do a number on healthy hair.  Freezing air outside and dry heat indoors can pull a double whammy and strip moisture from your pores, resulting in rough static-y hair and a dry scalp. Well, spring has sprung and Phyllis Lowry, a local expert at  Salon Lanier, offers some simple steps you can add to your normal beauty routine that will breathe new life into your winter-weary hair. 1. Step away from the shampoo!  Yes, you read that right.  Although everyone’s hair is different, “we tend to use WAY more soap than we need,” says Lowry.  Shampooing strips moisture from the scalp and hair. Instead of washing everyday, try skipping the shampoo every other day, and simply wet hair with tepid (not hot) water and condition as usual instead. 2. Treat your hair to a cool rinse.  Yes, it’s cold outside and that warm stream of water feels oh so very nice, but hot water opens up your hair’s cuticle allowing moisture to escape.  Finishing with a cool rinse helps shut down your hair’s cuticle, locking moisture in and promoting shine. 3. Dry hair fully and finish styling with a blast of cold air from your blow dryer. Water expands when it freezes.  Going outside with damp hair in freezing weather can cause the water on your hair to expand and damage the structure of your hair. Drying your hair fully before heading outside protects your hair all the way from its root to its tip, locking moisture in and protecting its shine. 4. And for an extra treat for dry winter weary hair, Lowry recommends a dab of pure coconut oil.  Simply warm a dab of oil between your hands then apply to ends for a burst of moisture.  If your scalp is also feeling dry and itchy, work the oil into your scalp with fingertips.  Wrap hair in a warm dry towel or cling wrap from the kitchen and relax for 20 minutes.  Wash, rinse, condition and style as usual! Your hair and skin will love you! Ready to freshen up your color or style?  Call to make an appointment with Phyllis today at Salon Lanier on College St., in Burlington (802) 651-8820.]]>
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Five Easy Ways to Buy Local https://www.localvoretoday.com/2013/03/25/five-easy-ways-to-buy-local/ https://www.localvoretoday.com/2013/03/25/five-easy-ways-to-buy-local/#comments Mon, 25 Mar 2013 14:10:58 +0000 https://www.localvoretoday.com/?p=45588 Click here to find a Farmer’s Market near you. 4)   Go out to eat at restaurants that buy from local farmers!  It’s a great way to explore the very best and freshest flavors available locally during any season.  It’s also a great way to discover new flavor combinations. Click here to see find members of the Vermont Fresh Network. 5)   AND, of course, keep visiting us here at Localvore Today!  We are your locally owned and operated online place to find and get great offers from local businesses. You get all the benefits of shopping at local businesses (talking to real people, getting what you want, having local customer service, keeping your neighbors employed, supporting your local economy, discovering new local treasures, etc.) AND you’ll also save money! Give it a try!  Buying local is easy and far more rewarding than you might initially think.  You may start buying local because it seems like “the right thing to do” or an easy way to help out local businesses. But, once you discover how easy it is to tap into a whole new and rich world of local flavor and craftsmanship, you’ll be the one who feels richer for it!]]> Becoming a localvore is one of the easiest and most rewarding transformations you can undertake, especially here in Vermont, where we are lucky to be surrounded by passionate, engaged and conscientious farmers, chefs and artisans of all types. Buying local is easy.  It’s rewarding.  And yet, we can forget to choose the local option, as easily as we forget our cloth bags in the back of the car and need to choose paper or plastic once we reach the check out line.

Below you’ll find 5 easy steps that will help you remember to buy local and get you on your way to becoming a true localvore!

1)   Choose one item on your grocery list that you and your family use on a regular basis (bread, muffins, milk, cheese, ice cream, honey…) and make a point to seek out and try a variety of locally produced versions of that item. For example, explore and try out a variety of locally baked breads.  You will be amazed at the variety available.  Plus, our local bakers are so talented and dedicated, you’ll be sure to discover amazing new flavors and favorites that you can’t imagine living without!

2)   Add one new locally produced item to your shopping list each month.  You’ll be surprised at how easy this is to do—locally produced items are everywhere!  Many localvores choose one meal a year or even a season that they plan using ONLY locally grown foods. This gets easier and easier to do as you familiarize yourself with all that is available throughout the year.

3)   Shop at Farmer’s Markets!  Farmer’s markets are not only a great place to find locally produced goods, but they also offer you the chance to talk to the person who made the item you are buying.  It’s a great way to get more information.  Farmers are usually more than happy to tell you how the season has affected the taste of their tomatoes, give you detailed information about how their animals are cared for, or what kind of herbs are used in their soaps.  Talking to the vendors at the Farmer’s Market is also a great way to discover far more varieties than are available in the grocery store. Click here to find a Farmer’s Market near you.

4)   Go out to eat at restaurants that buy from local farmers!  It’s a great way to explore the very best and freshest flavors available locally during any season.  It’s also a great way to discover new flavor combinations. Click here to see find members of the Vermont Fresh Network.

5)   AND, of course, keep visiting us here at Localvore Today!  We are your locally owned and operated online place to find and get great offers from local businesses. You get all the benefits of shopping at local businesses (talking to real people, getting what you want, having local customer service, keeping your neighbors employed, supporting your local economy, discovering new local treasures, etc.) AND you’ll also save money!

Give it a try!  Buying local is easy and far more rewarding than you might initially think.  You may start buying local because it seems like “the right thing to do” or an easy way to help out local businesses. But, once you discover how easy it is to tap into a whole new and rich world of local flavor and craftsmanship, you’ll be the one who feels richer for it!

Becoming a localvore is one of the easiest and most rewarding transformations you can undertake, especially here in Vermont, where we are lucky to be surrounded by passionate, engaged and conscientious farmers, chefs and artisans of all types. Buying local is easy.  It’s rewarding.  And yet, we can forget to choose the local option, as easily as we forget our cloth bags in the back of the car and need to choose paper or plastic once we reach the check out line. Below you’ll find 5 easy steps that will help you remember to buy local and get you on your way to becoming a true localvore! 1)   Choose one item on your grocery list that you and your family use on a regular basis (bread, muffins, milk, cheese, ice cream, honey…) and make a point to seek out and try a variety of locally produced versions of that item. For example, explore and try out a variety of locally baked breads.  You will be amazed at the variety available.  Plus, our local bakers are so talented and dedicated, you’ll be sure to discover amazing new flavors and favorites that you can’t imagine living without! 2)   Add one new locally produced item to your shopping list each month.  You’ll be surprised at how easy this is to do—locally produced items are everywhere!  Many localvores choose one meal a year or even a season that they plan using ONLY locally grown foods. This gets easier and easier to do as you familiarize yourself with all that is available throughout the year. 3)   Shop at Farmer’s Markets!  Farmer’s markets are not only a great place to find locally produced goods, but they also offer you the chance to talk to the person who made the item you are buying.  It’s a great way to get more information.  Farmers are usually more than happy to tell you how the season has affected the taste of their tomatoes, give you detailed information about how their animals are cared for, or what kind of herbs are used in their soaps.  Talking to the vendors at the Farmer’s Market is also a great way to discover far more varieties than are available in the grocery store. Click here to find a Farmer’s Market near you. 4)   Go out to eat at restaurants that buy from local farmers!  It’s a great way to explore the very best and freshest flavors available locally during any season.  It’s also a great way to discover new flavor combinations. Click here to see find members of the Vermont Fresh Network. 5)   AND, of course, keep visiting us here at Localvore Today!  We are your locally owned and operated online place to find and get great offers from local businesses. You get all the benefits of shopping at local businesses (talking to real people, getting what you want, having local customer service, keeping your neighbors employed, supporting your local economy, discovering new local treasures, etc.) AND you’ll also save money! Give it a try!  Buying local is easy and far more rewarding than you might initially think.  You may start buying local because it seems like “the right thing to do” or an easy way to help out local businesses. But, once you discover how easy it is to tap into a whole new and rich world of local flavor and craftsmanship, you’ll be the one who feels richer for it!]]>
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Is your Skin Feeling as Grey and Rough as the Salt Drenched Roads? Tootsies Mini Spa Has a Sweet Tip to Bring Dry Skin Back to Life! https://www.localvoretoday.com/2013/03/20/is-your-skin-feeling-as-grey-and-rough-as-the-salt-drenched-roads-tootsies-mini-spa-has-a-sweet-tip-to-bring-dry-skin-back-to-life/ https://www.localvoretoday.com/2013/03/20/is-your-skin-feeling-as-grey-and-rough-as-the-salt-drenched-roads-tootsies-mini-spa-has-a-sweet-tip-to-bring-dry-skin-back-to-life/#comments Wed, 20 Mar 2013 14:10:03 +0000 https://www.localvoretoday.com/?p=42226 tootsies-fb-logoDry scaly skin isn’t a mere cosmetic inconvenience.  Your skin is your body’s largest organ and the only one you wear on the outside of our bodies! Your skin works hard all year ‘round to keep your insides in and the outside out--protecting your body against germs and the elements while absorbing and metabolizing vital nutrients from the sun.  But harsh winter temperatures and dry indoor heat can strip your skin of the oils it needs to stay healthy and supple. No time for intensive therapy or a trip to the spa?  No worries! Beth Etsy of Tootsies Mini Spa, now located at 166 Battery St. at the Burlington waterfront, one of Burlington’s top beauty specialists, has a luxuriously simple tip to save the day and help you show your skin some much needed love. tootsies-fb“I have a great way to keep hands soft and hydrated during these dry winter months.  It requires only a short trip to your kitchen panty!” says Etsy, owner of Tootsies Mini Spa. Grab an oil of your choice--Etsy loves almond oil, but others will do--granulated sugar, your favorite fragrant soap, a clean towel and find a cozy spot near a sink to relax and replenish! Begin by placing an equal amount of oil and sugar (about a teaspoon to start) in the palm of your dry hand and rub your hands together to mix and gently exfoliate. Work the mixture around each finger and massage the whole hand from each fingertip to the wrist, working out tension as well as dryness from your hard working palms. Rinse with warm (not hot) water and gently wash with a fragrant mild soap. Pat dry and apply your favorite lotion. “Voilà,” says Etsy. “Dry skin gone. Soft hands appear!” This simple potion is also great for feet and elbows, which also tend to be dry and even cracked in winter. Are your skin and nails in need of more intensive attention?  Let the experts at Tootsies Mini Spa help you out! They’ve recently moved to a new super cozy location on Battery St., near the waterfront in Burlington.  Call to make a reservation today!]]> tootsies-fb-logoDry scaly skin isn’t a mere cosmetic inconvenience.  Your skin is your body’s largest organ and the only one you wear on the outside of our bodies! Your skin works hard all year ‘round to keep your insides in and the outside out–protecting your body against germs and the elements while absorbing and metabolizing vital nutrients from the sun.  But harsh winter temperatures and dry indoor heat can strip your skin of the oils it needs to stay healthy and supple.

No time for intensive therapy or a trip to the spa?  No worries! Beth Etsy of Tootsies Mini Spa, now located at 166 Battery St. at the Burlington waterfront, one of Burlington’s top beauty specialists, has a luxuriously simple tip to save the day and help you show your skin some much needed love.

tootsies-fb“I have a great way to keep hands soft and hydrated during these dry winter months.  It requires only a short trip to your kitchen panty!” says Etsy, owner of Tootsies Mini Spa. Grab an oil of your choice–Etsy loves almond oil, but others will do–granulated sugar, your favorite fragrant soap, a clean towel and find a cozy spot near a sink to relax and replenish!

Begin by placing an equal amount of oil and sugar (about a teaspoon to start) in the palm of your dry hand and rub your hands together to mix and gently exfoliate. Work the mixture around each finger and massage the whole hand from each fingertip to the wrist, working out tension as well as dryness from your hard working palms. Rinse with warm (not hot) water and gently wash with a fragrant mild soap. Pat dry and apply your favorite lotion.

“Voilà,” says Etsy. “Dry skin gone. Soft hands appear!” This simple potion is also great for feet and elbows, which also tend to be dry and even cracked in winter.

Are your skin and nails in need of more intensive attention?  Let the experts at Tootsies Mini Spa help you out! They’ve recently moved to a new super cozy location on Battery St., near the waterfront in Burlington.  Call to make a reservation today!

tootsies-fb-logoDry scaly skin isn’t a mere cosmetic inconvenience.  Your skin is your body’s largest organ and the only one you wear on the outside of our bodies! Your skin works hard all year ‘round to keep your insides in and the outside out--protecting your body against germs and the elements while absorbing and metabolizing vital nutrients from the sun.  But harsh winter temperatures and dry indoor heat can strip your skin of the oils it needs to stay healthy and supple. No time for intensive therapy or a trip to the spa?  No worries! Beth Etsy of Tootsies Mini Spa, now located at 166 Battery St. at the Burlington waterfront, one of Burlington’s top beauty specialists, has a luxuriously simple tip to save the day and help you show your skin some much needed love. tootsies-fb“I have a great way to keep hands soft and hydrated during these dry winter months.  It requires only a short trip to your kitchen panty!” says Etsy, owner of Tootsies Mini Spa. Grab an oil of your choice--Etsy loves almond oil, but others will do--granulated sugar, your favorite fragrant soap, a clean towel and find a cozy spot near a sink to relax and replenish! Begin by placing an equal amount of oil and sugar (about a teaspoon to start) in the palm of your dry hand and rub your hands together to mix and gently exfoliate. Work the mixture around each finger and massage the whole hand from each fingertip to the wrist, working out tension as well as dryness from your hard working palms. Rinse with warm (not hot) water and gently wash with a fragrant mild soap. Pat dry and apply your favorite lotion. “Voilà,” says Etsy. “Dry skin gone. Soft hands appear!” This simple potion is also great for feet and elbows, which also tend to be dry and even cracked in winter. Are your skin and nails in need of more intensive attention?  Let the experts at Tootsies Mini Spa help you out! They’ve recently moved to a new super cozy location on Battery St., near the waterfront in Burlington.  Call to make a reservation today!]]>
https://www.localvoretoday.com/2013/03/20/is-your-skin-feeling-as-grey-and-rough-as-the-salt-drenched-roads-tootsies-mini-spa-has-a-sweet-tip-to-bring-dry-skin-back-to-life/feed/ 0
Localvore Today Plays a Vital Role in the Local Economic Ecosystem https://www.localvoretoday.com/2013/03/15/localvore-today-plays-a-vital-role-in-the-local-economic-ecosystem/ https://www.localvoretoday.com/2013/03/15/localvore-today-plays-a-vital-role-in-the-local-economic-ecosystem/#comments Fri, 15 Mar 2013 14:10:22 +0000 https://www.localvoretoday.com/?p=42191 keystone species."These species' importance extends beyond their biomass, or the collective weight of resident individuals . . . For instance, a typical elephant herd can weigh several hundred tons, but the effect it has on the grasslands on which the animals graze has a cascading impact on other species that exceeds their physical presence." (Kelly)  In a community, there tend to be certain businesses who because of their relative size, market share and/or position within the community can be viewed as the keystone species of the local economy. Their impact is felt by many and depending on how this weight is leveraged can be of great benefit to the other stakeholders in the local economic ecosystem. This is one area where Localvore Today hopes to be of service. While we are trying to maintain a profitable and thus sustainable business for ourselves, one of our main goals is to increase the interaction between local businesses and an expanding customer base which we believe strengthens community ties and creates a more resilient local economy in the process. When we run an offer for one of the "keystone" businesses in a community, one whom many are familiar with and who already have a consistent stream of customers, it creates an interest in Localvore Today as a service. We get an uptick in traffic and sales and this in turn translates into more subscribers. As our email list grows we are then able to leverage this potential market and deliver it to those smaller businesses in the community whose visibility may not be as great. More potential customers are introduced to the business, visibility is increased, and new connections and interactions ensue. While there is a tendency in traditional economic theory to view businesses in a place mainly through the lens of being in competition with one another, the concepts of the economic ecosystem paints a different picture that if grasped can create a more positive and resilient environment for the local business community and the ones they serve.  We at Localvore Today are hoping that we can be a tool for this end.   Matthew Yezuita is a graphic designer/web developer with a few other tricks up his sleeve living in Burlington, VT. You can reach him at: http://virgoascendant.com   ________ Kelly, Morgan. "In financial ecosystems, big banks trample economic habitats and spread fiscal disease." News at Princeton. Princeton University. 14 Nov. 2012. Web. 5 Jan. 2012.  ]]> Picture this: A beautiful Vermont landscape with clean water, vibrant vegetation, animals with abundant space and food with which to live and thrive, resilient to occasional fluctuations in weather and the occasional natural disaster. A vibrant network of interconnected parts, all playing a vital role in supporting one another and creating one healthy living organism.  Sound familiar?  The balance necessary  to maintain a healthy ecosystem is pretty well-known and widely accepted by pretty much everyone, scientists and laymen alike, at this point.

Now think about this: The same balanced interconnectedness that maintains a healthy ecosystem, is also necessary to support a healthy local economy! We here at Localvore Today would like to think of ourselves as helping to bring to light the economic inter-connections that can contribute to a self-sufficient, resilient and healthy place for the businesses and customers that interact in our communities.

It is fitting to point out that both terms, “ecology,” defined as the study of natural organisms and their habitat and “economy,” defined originally as relating to the management of a household, have the same root word “eco” – which comes from the Greek term for “house.” With that in mind, I’d like to introduce a concept which uses the language of environmental science to analogize the workings of economies, this is the idea of the “economic ecosystem.”

An ecosystem, in environmental terms, is defined as the relationship between living organisms–both with one another and with their habitat. We can view a local economy in a similar way.  An economic ecosystem is comprised of many independent entities (i.e. merchants, businesses, service providers and consumers) and the health of that economic ecosystem is dependent on the relationship that exists between each of those individual parts as well as their relationship with their environment at large.

In an ecosystem there are organisms who have a much greater impact on their environment than others, these are known as keystone species.These species’ importance extends beyond their biomass, or the collective weight of resident individuals . . . For instance, a typical elephant herd can weigh several hundred tons, but the effect it has on the grasslands on which the animals graze has a cascading impact on other species that exceeds their physical presence.” (Kelly) 

In a community, there tend to be certain businesses who because of their relative size, market share and/or position within the community can be viewed as the keystone species of the local economy. Their impact is felt by many and depending on how this weight is leveraged can be of great benefit to the other stakeholders in the local economic ecosystem. This is one area where Localvore Today hopes to be of service. While we are trying to maintain a profitable and thus sustainable business for ourselves, one of our main goals is to increase the interaction between local businesses and an expanding customer base which we believe strengthens community ties and creates a more resilient local economy in the process.

When we run an offer for one of the “keystone” businesses in a community, one whom many are familiar with and who already have a consistent stream of customers, it creates an interest in Localvore Today as a service. We get an uptick in traffic and sales and this in turn translates into more subscribers. As our email list grows we are then able to leverage this potential market and deliver it to those smaller businesses in the community whose visibility may not be as great. More potential customers are introduced to the business, visibility is increased, and new connections and interactions ensue.

While there is a tendency in traditional economic theory to view businesses in a place mainly through the lens of being in competition with one another, the concepts of the economic ecosystem paints a different picture that if grasped can create a more positive and resilient environment for the local business community and the ones they serve.  We at Localvore Today are hoping that we can be a tool for this end.

 

Matthew Yezuita is a graphic designer/web developer with a few other tricks up his sleeve living in Burlington, VT. You can reach him at: http://virgoascendant.com

 

________

Kelly, Morgan. “In financial ecosystems, big banks trample economic habitats and spread fiscal disease.” News at Princeton. Princeton University. 14 Nov. 2012. Web. 5 Jan. 2012.

 

Picture this: A beautiful Vermont landscape with clean water, vibrant vegetation, animals with abundant space and food with which to live and thrive, resilient to occasional fluctuations in weather and the occasional natural disaster. A vibrant network of interconnected parts, all playing a vital role in supporting one another and creating one healthy living organism.  Sound familiar?  The balance necessary  to maintain a healthy ecosystem is pretty well-known and widely accepted by pretty much everyone, scientists and laymen alike, at this point. Now think about this: The same balanced interconnectedness that maintains a healthy ecosystem, is also necessary to support a healthy local economy! We here at Localvore Today would like to think of ourselves as helping to bring to light the economic inter-connections that can contribute to a self-sufficient, resilient and healthy place for the businesses and customers that interact in our communities. It is fitting to point out that both terms, "ecology," defined as the study of natural organisms and their habitat and "economy," defined originally as relating to the management of a household, have the same root word "eco" - which comes from the Greek term for "house." With that in mind, I'd like to introduce a concept which uses the language of environmental science to analogize the workings of economies, this is the idea of the "economic ecosystem." An ecosystem, in environmental terms, is defined as the relationship between living organisms--both with one another and with their habitat. We can view a local economy in a similar way.  An economic ecosystem is comprised of many independent entities (i.e. merchants, businesses, service providers and consumers) and the health of that economic ecosystem is dependent on the relationship that exists between each of those individual parts as well as their relationship with their environment at large. In an ecosystem there are organisms who have a much greater impact on their environment than others, these are known as keystone species."These species' importance extends beyond their biomass, or the collective weight of resident individuals . . . For instance, a typical elephant herd can weigh several hundred tons, but the effect it has on the grasslands on which the animals graze has a cascading impact on other species that exceeds their physical presence." (Kelly)  In a community, there tend to be certain businesses who because of their relative size, market share and/or position within the community can be viewed as the keystone species of the local economy. Their impact is felt by many and depending on how this weight is leveraged can be of great benefit to the other stakeholders in the local economic ecosystem. This is one area where Localvore Today hopes to be of service. While we are trying to maintain a profitable and thus sustainable business for ourselves, one of our main goals is to increase the interaction between local businesses and an expanding customer base which we believe strengthens community ties and creates a more resilient local economy in the process. When we run an offer for one of the "keystone" businesses in a community, one whom many are familiar with and who already have a consistent stream of customers, it creates an interest in Localvore Today as a service. We get an uptick in traffic and sales and this in turn translates into more subscribers. As our email list grows we are then able to leverage this potential market and deliver it to those smaller businesses in the community whose visibility may not be as great. More potential customers are introduced to the business, visibility is increased, and new connections and interactions ensue. While there is a tendency in traditional economic theory to view businesses in a place mainly through the lens of being in competition with one another, the concepts of the economic ecosystem paints a different picture that if grasped can create a more positive and resilient environment for the local business community and the ones they serve.  We at Localvore Today are hoping that we can be a tool for this end.   Matthew Yezuita is a graphic designer/web developer with a few other tricks up his sleeve living in Burlington, VT. You can reach him at: http://virgoascendant.com   ________ Kelly, Morgan. "In financial ecosystems, big banks trample economic habitats and spread fiscal disease." News at Princeton. Princeton University. 14 Nov. 2012. Web. 5 Jan. 2012.  ]]>
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There’s No Doubt About It! Buying Local Has a BIG Economic Impact. https://www.localvoretoday.com/2013/03/13/theres-no-doubt-about-it-buying-local-has-a-big-economic-impact/ https://www.localvoretoday.com/2013/03/13/theres-no-doubt-about-it-buying-local-has-a-big-economic-impact/#comments Wed, 13 Mar 2013 14:10:03 +0000 https://www.localvoretoday.com/?p=42232 Studies Show Buying Local has a Major Impact on your local economy. On a dollar-for-dollar basis, the local economic impact and benefit of shopping at independently owned businesses is significantly greater than that of shopping at national chains. A 2011 study by Garrett Martin and Amar Patel of the Maine Center for Economic Policy, analyzed data collected from 28 locally owned retail businesses in Portland, Maine, along with corporate filings for a representative national chain.  The researchers found that every $100 spent at locally owned businesses contributes an additional $58 to the local economy.  By comparison, $100 spent at a chain store in Portland yields just $33 in local economic impact. Why the difference? Studies show that locally owned businesses reinvest far more of every dollar they earn back into their local economy through: 1. Profits paid out to local owners, 2. Wages paid to local workers, 3. Procurement of goods services for internal use, 4. Procurement of local goods for resale, and 5. Charitable giving within the community This means that when you shop locally, a much larger share of the money you spend at a locally owned store stays in your local economy, supporting a variety of other businesses and jobs. Unlike any other group buying website in Vermont, Localvore Today is a 100% locally owned and operated company, with absolutely no out-of-state corporate strings attached. So, when you purchase an offer for a locally owned business through Localvore Today, you are supporting TWO locally owned businesses—us AND the merchant we represent.  This means that 58% of EVERY dollar you spend stays in your local economy. Other group buying sites are NOT locally owned and operated.  They are owned in large part by such mega companies as Amazon and JP Morgan, so even when you purchase an offer for a local business through one of these other sites, 67% of EVERY dollar you spend is TAKEN OUT of our local economy right off the top, even before it trickles down to the local business. Double your local impact! Localvore Today is a very young company.  Even though we have only been live for six months, you’ve already helped us capture 10% of the Daily Deal market in Vermont! What happens when you support Localvore Today? You help keep dollars in the local economy by creating local jobs, conserve tax dollars, strengthen our local community and help support local causes. Together, we create and sustain Vermont as a destination for visitors, guests, and new neighbors. Buy Local. Choose Localvore! Are YOU a local business owner?  If so, we want to hear from YOU!!!  How does YOUR business benefit our community?]]> Studies Show Buying Local has a Major Impact on your local economy.

On a dollar-for-dollar basis, the local economic impact and benefit of shopping at independently owned businesses is significantly greater than that of shopping at national chains. A 2011 study by Garrett Martin and Amar Patel of the Maine Center for Economic Policy, analyzed data collected from 28 locally owned retail businesses in Portland, Maine, along with corporate filings for a representative national chain.  The researchers found that every $100 spent at locally owned businesses contributes an additional $58 to the local economy.  By comparison, $100 spent at a chain store in Portland yields just $33 in local economic impact.

Why the difference? Studies show that locally owned businesses reinvest far more of every dollar they earn back into their local economy through:

1. Profits paid out to local owners,

2. Wages paid to local workers,

3. Procurement of goods services for internal use,

4. Procurement of local goods for resale, and

5. Charitable giving within the community

This means that when you shop locally, a much larger share of the money you spend at a locally owned store stays in your local economy, supporting a variety of other businesses and jobs.

Unlike any other group buying website in Vermont, Localvore Today is a 100% locally owned and operated company, with absolutely no out-of-state corporate strings attached. So, when you purchase an offer for a locally owned business through Localvore Today, you are supporting TWO locally owned businesses—us AND the merchant we represent.  This means that 58% of EVERY dollar you spend stays in your local economy.

Other group buying sites are NOT locally owned and operated.  They are owned in large part by such mega companies as Amazon and JP Morgan, so even when you purchase an offer for a local business through one of these other sites, 67% of EVERY dollar you spend is TAKEN OUT of our local economy right off the top, even before it trickles down to the local business.

Double your local impact!

Localvore Today is a very young company.  Even though we have only been live for six months, you’ve already helped us capture 10% of the Daily Deal market in Vermont! What happens when you support Localvore Today? You help keep dollars in the local economy by creating local jobs, conserve tax dollars, strengthen our local community and help support local causes.

Together, we create and sustain Vermont as a destination for visitors, guests, and new neighbors.

Buy Local. Choose Localvore!

Are YOU a local business owner?  If so, we want to hear from YOU!!!  How does YOUR business benefit our community?

Studies Show Buying Local has a Major Impact on your local economy. On a dollar-for-dollar basis, the local economic impact and benefit of shopping at independently owned businesses is significantly greater than that of shopping at national chains. A 2011 study by Garrett Martin and Amar Patel of the Maine Center for Economic Policy, analyzed data collected from 28 locally owned retail businesses in Portland, Maine, along with corporate filings for a representative national chain.  The researchers found that every $100 spent at locally owned businesses contributes an additional $58 to the local economy.  By comparison, $100 spent at a chain store in Portland yields just $33 in local economic impact. Why the difference? Studies show that locally owned businesses reinvest far more of every dollar they earn back into their local economy through: 1. Profits paid out to local owners, 2. Wages paid to local workers, 3. Procurement of goods services for internal use, 4. Procurement of local goods for resale, and 5. Charitable giving within the community This means that when you shop locally, a much larger share of the money you spend at a locally owned store stays in your local economy, supporting a variety of other businesses and jobs. Unlike any other group buying website in Vermont, Localvore Today is a 100% locally owned and operated company, with absolutely no out-of-state corporate strings attached. So, when you purchase an offer for a locally owned business through Localvore Today, you are supporting TWO locally owned businesses—us AND the merchant we represent.  This means that 58% of EVERY dollar you spend stays in your local economy. Other group buying sites are NOT locally owned and operated.  They are owned in large part by such mega companies as Amazon and JP Morgan, so even when you purchase an offer for a local business through one of these other sites, 67% of EVERY dollar you spend is TAKEN OUT of our local economy right off the top, even before it trickles down to the local business. Double your local impact! Localvore Today is a very young company.  Even though we have only been live for six months, you’ve already helped us capture 10% of the Daily Deal market in Vermont! What happens when you support Localvore Today? You help keep dollars in the local economy by creating local jobs, conserve tax dollars, strengthen our local community and help support local causes. Together, we create and sustain Vermont as a destination for visitors, guests, and new neighbors. Buy Local. Choose Localvore! Are YOU a local business owner?  If so, we want to hear from YOU!!!  How does YOUR business benefit our community?]]>
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What Is A Localvore, Anyway? https://www.localvoretoday.com/2013/03/11/what-is-a-localvore-anyway/ https://www.localvoretoday.com/2013/03/11/what-is-a-localvore-anyway/#comments Mon, 11 Mar 2013 14:10:47 +0000 https://www.localvoretoday.com/?p=42168 You know what a carnivore is. tiger

  You’ve seen plenty of herbivores.cow   And, I’m sure many of us are omnivores. burger   But WHAT, exactly is a Localvore?

kid

  That’s the question my six yr. old son asked one day after reading the signs in our local co-op announcing that week’s “Localvore Special.”  It’s a word we hear often nowadays but may not understand what it really means.  Or is it something I should learn more about? And if we don’t know exactly what it means, how do we know if we are one? Or how does one become one?   Those are all great questions.   A localvore, put simply, is someone who consumes local foods, products and services.  This may mean eating locally grown foods from a Farmer’s Market or buying locally baked brownies from your grocery store.  But it can also mean ordering a book through your local, independently owned bookstore choosing locally grown materials for a home remodeling project, decorating your home with original pieces crafted by a local artist, or choosing to pick up your medication from a locally owned pharmacy.   The New Oxford American Dictionary chose localvore, a person who seeks out locally produced food, as its word of the year 2007 and since then, the word has grown in popularity and changed in meaning along with the movement it has come to represent. The localvore movement encourages consumers to purchase goods from farmer's markets or even to produce their own food, with the argument that fresh, local products are more nutritious and taste better. Locally grown food is an environmentally friendly means of obtaining food, as opposed to purchasing imported foods that have relied on fossil fuels and non-renewable resources to reach the store shelves. In recent years, the localvore movement has evolved beyond the boundaries of food and has come to signify a broader sustainability movement that involves focusing on participating in and supporting the local economy. Local is a vague word that is hard to pin down with specific geographic boundaries. Although many localvores find it helpful to seek out products produced within a certain radius of their home, such as 50, 100 or 150 miles, there is no agreed upon distance that proves to be functional for all localvores.  For instance, a localvore living on the edge of Philadelphia might very well be able to meet nearly all of his needs by consuming goods produced within 50 miles of his home since that area is so densely and diversely populated.  Someone living in a small remote town, however, may find it much harder to find access to locally produced products and may need to purchase goods made 100 miles or even 200 hundred miles away due to scarcity.   Like many things, the true spirit of a localvore can get lost when focusing on or quibbling over the details that define it.  Instead, it is better to understand local as characterizing an area or a group of people who share the same interests, space and resources and a localvore as someone who wants to connect with and support his local environment—both the land and the people by consuming goods and services created in that environment.   Here at Localvore Today, we are committed to making it easier for Vermonters to be localvores --support their local economies and enjoy the richness of products and services that abound all around them--by connecting consumers with outstanding local foods, products and services.   Being a localvore isn’t about sacrifice or deprivation. It’s about raising your awareness of where your purchases come from and choosing more local goods and services when you can.   So, now, if you asked my son “what exactly is a localvore?”  He would grin and say … “ME!”

earth

  What does being a localvore mean to you?]]>
You know what a carnivore is. tiger

 

You’ve seen plenty of herbivores.cow

 

And, I’m sure many of us are omnivores. burger

 

But WHAT, exactly is a Localvore?

kid

 

That’s the question my six yr. old son asked one day after reading the signs in our local co-op announcing that week’s “Localvore Special.”  It’s a word we hear often nowadays but may not understand what it really means.  Or is it something I should learn more about? And if we don’t know exactly what it means, how do we know if we are one? Or how does one become one?

 

Those are all great questions.

 

A localvore, put simply, is someone who consumes local foods, products and services.  This may mean eating locally grown foods from a Farmer’s Market or buying locally baked brownies from your grocery store.  But it can also mean ordering a book through your local, independently owned bookstore choosing locally grown materials for a home remodeling project, decorating your home with original pieces crafted by a local artist, or choosing to pick up your medication from a locally owned pharmacy.

 

The New Oxford American Dictionary chose localvore, a person who seeks out locally produced food, as its word of the year 2007 and since then, the word has grown in popularity and changed in meaning along with the movement it has come to represent. The localvore movement encourages consumers to purchase goods from farmer’s markets or even to produce their own food, with the argument that fresh, local products are more nutritious and taste better. Locally grown food is an environmentally friendly means of obtaining food, as opposed to purchasing imported foods that have relied on fossil fuels and non-renewable resources to reach the store shelves. In recent years, the localvore movement has evolved beyond the boundaries of food and has come to signify a broader sustainability movement that involves focusing on participating in and supporting the local economy.

Local is a vague word that is hard to pin down with specific geographic boundaries. Although many localvores find it helpful to seek out products produced within a certain radius of their home, such as 50, 100 or 150 miles, there is no agreed upon distance that proves to be functional for all localvores.  For instance, a localvore living on the edge of Philadelphia might very well be able to meet nearly all of his needs by consuming goods produced within 50 miles of his home since that area is so densely and diversely populated.  Someone living in a small remote town, however, may find it much harder to find access to locally produced products and may need to purchase goods made 100 miles or even 200 hundred miles away due to scarcity.

 

Like many things, the true spirit of a localvore can get lost when focusing on or quibbling over the details that define it.  Instead, it is better to understand local as characterizing an area or a group of people who share the same interests, space and resources and a localvore as someone who wants to connect with and support his local environment—both the land and the people by consuming goods and services created in that environment.

 

Here at Localvore Today, we are committed to making it easier for Vermonters to be localvores –support their local economies and enjoy the richness of products and services that abound all around them–by connecting consumers with outstanding local foods, products and services.

 

Being a localvore isn’t about sacrifice or deprivation. It’s about raising your awareness of where your purchases come from and choosing more local goods and services when you can.

 

So, now, if you asked my son “what exactly is a localvore?”  He would grin and say … “ME!”

earth

 

What does being a localvore mean to you?

You know what a carnivore is. tiger

  You’ve seen plenty of herbivores.cow   And, I’m sure many of us are omnivores. burger   But WHAT, exactly is a Localvore?

kid

  That’s the question my six yr. old son asked one day after reading the signs in our local co-op announcing that week’s “Localvore Special.”  It’s a word we hear often nowadays but may not understand what it really means.  Or is it something I should learn more about? And if we don’t know exactly what it means, how do we know if we are one? Or how does one become one?   Those are all great questions.   A localvore, put simply, is someone who consumes local foods, products and services.  This may mean eating locally grown foods from a Farmer’s Market or buying locally baked brownies from your grocery store.  But it can also mean ordering a book through your local, independently owned bookstore choosing locally grown materials for a home remodeling project, decorating your home with original pieces crafted by a local artist, or choosing to pick up your medication from a locally owned pharmacy.   The New Oxford American Dictionary chose localvore, a person who seeks out locally produced food, as its word of the year 2007 and since then, the word has grown in popularity and changed in meaning along with the movement it has come to represent. The localvore movement encourages consumers to purchase goods from farmer's markets or even to produce their own food, with the argument that fresh, local products are more nutritious and taste better. Locally grown food is an environmentally friendly means of obtaining food, as opposed to purchasing imported foods that have relied on fossil fuels and non-renewable resources to reach the store shelves. In recent years, the localvore movement has evolved beyond the boundaries of food and has come to signify a broader sustainability movement that involves focusing on participating in and supporting the local economy. Local is a vague word that is hard to pin down with specific geographic boundaries. Although many localvores find it helpful to seek out products produced within a certain radius of their home, such as 50, 100 or 150 miles, there is no agreed upon distance that proves to be functional for all localvores.  For instance, a localvore living on the edge of Philadelphia might very well be able to meet nearly all of his needs by consuming goods produced within 50 miles of his home since that area is so densely and diversely populated.  Someone living in a small remote town, however, may find it much harder to find access to locally produced products and may need to purchase goods made 100 miles or even 200 hundred miles away due to scarcity.   Like many things, the true spirit of a localvore can get lost when focusing on or quibbling over the details that define it.  Instead, it is better to understand local as characterizing an area or a group of people who share the same interests, space and resources and a localvore as someone who wants to connect with and support his local environment—both the land and the people by consuming goods and services created in that environment.   Here at Localvore Today, we are committed to making it easier for Vermonters to be localvores --support their local economies and enjoy the richness of products and services that abound all around them--by connecting consumers with outstanding local foods, products and services.   Being a localvore isn’t about sacrifice or deprivation. It’s about raising your awareness of where your purchases come from and choosing more local goods and services when you can.   So, now, if you asked my son “what exactly is a localvore?”  He would grin and say … “ME!”

earth

  What does being a localvore mean to you?]]>
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Tomgirl Juice Company https://www.localvoretoday.com/2013/03/07/tomgirl-juice-company/ https://www.localvoretoday.com/2013/03/07/tomgirl-juice-company/#comments Thu, 07 Mar 2013 18:03:57 +0000 https://www.localvoretoday.com/?p=41861 tomgirl

This blog is cross-posted with permission from the Localvores over at Bits & Bites! Check out their blog! tomgirl I love juice, but I don’t love making it. It’s an expensive habit, first of all–you need to purchase a juicer, of course, which can run you anywhere from $40 to $500 dollars. You also need a lot of produce to make a typical 12- or so ounce serving of juice. If you’re using organic produce, it can definitely add up quickly. In my kitchen, I’m much more of a smoothie girl–the $50 juicer my mom and I bought together has largely gone unused since our unsuccessful fruit-and-veggies-only cleanse last summer (it was supposed to be a week long; we lasted three days). Blending requires much less prep work, much less produce, and cleaning up is so much easier. If someone else is doing the work for me, though? I’m all about juice. That’s why, when Alex gave me two bottles of TomGirl Juice Company’s products for Valentine’s Day, I had a hard time sharing. TomGirl is a fantastic Burlington-based company that specializes in fresh, organic juice and nut milk that features “our state’s outstanding array of wild and local produce.” They have a cart in the city where you can buy from them directly, or–and this is where it gets awesome–you can order online and have them deliver (for free!) to your house. Delicious juice at my doorstep? I’m sold. (Apparently, you can also have them bring the cart to events like a wedding or birthday party, which is a great idea). Their delivery menu features seven “signature” juices/milks, all of which are completely drool-worthy. Alex got me the Grapefruit and Strawberry juice (which isn’t on their website yet, but is featured on their Facebook with a promise that it’ll “absolutely remain available for the rest of the year”) and the Sprouted Almond Milk. They were both incredible. The Grapefruit and Strawberry juice was perfectly blended–the strong sourness of the citrus was balanced out by the sweetness of the strawberries. It was super refreshing and would be the ideal drink for a lazy summer day. I was a little bit apprehensive about the almond milk, because I’m usually not a huge fan of drinking non-dairy milk straight (I like it more in smoothies or over cereal). It was one of the most delicious drinks I’ve ever had, though. It was sweetened with a bit of maple syrup and spiced with plenty of cinnamon and a touch of cloves–it was all I could do to stop myself from chugging it. It was amazing on its own, but it would be equally as delicious mixed with hot chocolate or with cereal. I have my eye on a few others on the menu–their green juices in particular look yummy. You can also get more traditional juices (just one fruit or vegetable), or can customize your own flavor. I saw on the website that for $60 a day, you can do their juice fast, which features 6 daily juices. It’s a great option if you’re planning on doing something like that–it takes all of the work out of an already-difficult process! I will admit that their juices aren’t cheap. A basic juice is $5, and the blends range from $5-9 for a pint.  It lasts for a while though (up to five days in the fridge) and a jar is probably 2-3 servings’ worth, so realistically it’s not that much more expensive than buying those Naked juices at the store–with the added bonus that you’ll be supporting a local company that uses quality ingredients. They also have partnered up with Localvore Today, a (much cooler) local version of Groupon, which features great deals to businesses in the area. That’s how Alex got my present–buy one, get one free. Keep an eye out for similar deals so you can stock up! As an added bonus, you get to keep and reuse the cute Ball jars that the juices come in. Not only is this great from a sustainability to perspective (no packaging to throw away!), Ball jars can be used for just about anything–I like to use them as drinking glasses, containers for homemade nut butter, or flower vases in the summertime. We’re pretty much obsessed with TomGirl’s juices, at this point, and highly recommend them for their delicious and convenient products and their awesome customer service. I can’t wait to visit their cart this spring and enjoy a refreshing drink in the warm weather!]]>
tomgirl

This blog is cross-posted with permission from the Localvores over at Bits & Bites! Check out their blog! tomgirl I love juice, but I don’t love making it. It’s an expensive habit, first of all–you need to purchase a juicer, of course, which can run you anywhere from $40 to $500 dollars. You also need a lot of produce to make a typical 12- or so ounce serving of juice. If you’re using organic produce, it can definitely add up quickly. In my kitchen, I’m much more of a smoothie girl–the $50 juicer my mom and I bought together has largely gone unused since our unsuccessful fruit-and-veggies-only cleanse last summer (it was supposed to be a week long; we lasted three days). Blending requires much less prep work, much less produce, and cleaning up is so much easier. If someone else is doing the work for me, though? I’m all about juice. That’s why, when Alex gave me two bottles of TomGirl Juice Company’s products for Valentine’s Day, I had a hard time sharing. TomGirl is a fantastic Burlington-based company that specializes in fresh, organic juice and nut milk that features “our state’s outstanding array of wild and local produce.” They have a cart in the city where you can buy from them directly, or–and this is where it gets awesome–you can order online and have them deliver (for free!) to your house. Delicious juice at my doorstep? I’m sold. (Apparently, you can also have them bring the cart to events like a wedding or birthday party, which is a great idea). Their delivery menu features seven “signature” juices/milks, all of which are completely drool-worthy. Alex got me the Grapefruit and Strawberry juice (which isn’t on their website yet, but is featured on their Facebook with a promise that it’ll “absolutely remain available for the rest of the year”) and the Sprouted Almond Milk. They were both incredible. The Grapefruit and Strawberry juice was perfectly blended–the strong sourness of the citrus was balanced out by the sweetness of the strawberries. It was super refreshing and would be the ideal drink for a lazy summer day. I was a little bit apprehensive about the almond milk, because I’m usually not a huge fan of drinking non-dairy milk straight (I like it more in smoothies or over cereal). It was one of the most delicious drinks I’ve ever had, though. It was sweetened with a bit of maple syrup and spiced with plenty of cinnamon and a touch of cloves–it was all I could do to stop myself from chugging it. It was amazing on its own, but it would be equally as delicious mixed with hot chocolate or with cereal. I have my eye on a few others on the menu–their green juices in particular look yummy. You can also get more traditional juices (just one fruit or vegetable), or can customize your own flavor. I saw on the website that for $60 a day, you can do their juice fast, which features 6 daily juices. It’s a great option if you’re planning on doing something like that–it takes all of the work out of an already-difficult process! I will admit that their juices aren’t cheap. A basic juice is $5, and the blends range from $5-9 for a pint.  It lasts for a while though (up to five days in the fridge) and a jar is probably 2-3 servings’ worth, so realistically it’s not that much more expensive than buying those Naked juices at the store–with the added bonus that you’ll be supporting a local company that uses quality ingredients. They also have partnered up with Localvore Today, a (much cooler) local version of Groupon, which features great deals to businesses in the area. That’s how Alex got my present–buy one, get one free. Keep an eye out for similar deals so you can stock up! As an added bonus, you get to keep and reuse the cute Ball jars that the juices come in. Not only is this great from a sustainability to perspective (no packaging to throw away!), Ball jars can be used for just about anything–I like to use them as drinking glasses, containers for homemade nut butter, or flower vases in the summertime. We’re pretty much obsessed with TomGirl’s juices, at this point, and highly recommend them for their delicious and convenient products and their awesome customer service. I can’t wait to visit their cart this spring and enjoy a refreshing drink in the warm weather!]]>
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Happy Valentine’s Day, Localvores! https://www.localvoretoday.com/2013/02/14/happy-valentines-day-localvores-2/ https://www.localvoretoday.com/2013/02/14/happy-valentines-day-localvores-2/#comments Fri, 15 Feb 2013 00:08:09 +0000 https://www.localvoretoday.com/?p=38967 shutterstock_124397422When you think of Valentine’s Day you probably think about heart-shaped boxes of chocolates, expensive bunches of roses and a little extra time with that special someone.  Believe me, there’s nothing wrong with chocolates, no matter the shape of the box, and I always love to get flowers…but Valentine’s Day should be so much more! Just take a moment to think about it.  We, as a nation (along with many other nations around the world), have dedicated an entire day to celebrate love! How amazing is that?!? You might think that Valentine’s Day is just another holiday schemed up by marketing professionals to increase revenue, but it isn’t so! Although no one really knows when the first Valentine’s Day practices began nor who St. Valentine really was—the Catholic Church recognizes at least three saints named Valentine, all of whom were martyred—the day has been associated with giving loved ones candy, flowers and small gifts for centuries and the month of February has been associated with love for nearly a thousand years. And I think that’s great! A month dedicated to love can mean so much more than confections and dinners out.  Valentine’s Day can be a yearly reminder to make time to acknowledge, appreciate and indulge in the people, things and activities that truly warm our hearts and make us FEEL loved.  That could mean taking the time to write a note to your best childhood friend or spending an afternoon visiting with your grandma. It could mean making your husband or wife’s favorite meal (even if it doesn’t include chocolate) or taking the four-legged love of your life on an extra long walk.  And sharing love and appreciation on Valentine’s Day could also mean, stopping to chat with a neighbor, snuggling up on the couch with your best friend or kids to watch a movie marathon, or even appreciating your OWN heart by taking a yoga class or going for a run. Love and happiness go hand-in-hand and have a wonderful way of being contagious!  So, to help celebrate this month of love, we at Localvore Today have come up with some pretty SWEET offers, tips and tidbits to help warm your heart and help you warm the heart of others. Be sure to check out today’s offer for a Free Hug redeemable at any participating human! Print out the voucher and head to anyone mentioned on our Participating Human List (check back often ‘cause the list keeps growing!) and get a free hug!  We’re sure you’ll love it so much, you’ll want to give one right back! We hope you have a wonderful day and want to know what YOUR favorite Valentine treat is! P.S. We are REALLY good huggers!        ]]> shutterstock_124397422When you think of Valentine’s Day you probably think about heart-shaped boxes of chocolates, expensive bunches of roses and a little extra time with that special someone.  Believe me, there’s nothing wrong with chocolates, no matter the shape of the box, and I always love to get flowers…but Valentine’s Day should be so much more!

Just take a moment to think about it.  We, as a nation (along with many other nations around the world), have dedicated an entire day to celebrate love! How amazing is that?!? You might think that Valentine’s Day is just another holiday schemed up by marketing professionals to increase revenue, but it isn’t so! Although no one really knows when the first Valentine’s Day practices began nor who St. Valentine really was—the Catholic Church recognizes at least three saints named Valentine, all of whom were martyred—the day has been associated with giving loved ones candy, flowers and small gifts for centuries and the month of February has been associated with love for nearly a thousand years. And I think that’s great!

A month dedicated to love can mean so much more than confections and dinners out.  Valentine’s Day can be a yearly reminder to make time to acknowledge, appreciate and indulge in the people, things and activities that truly warm our hearts and make us FEEL loved.  That could mean taking the time to write a note to your best childhood friend or spending an afternoon visiting with your grandma. It could mean making your husband or wife’s favorite meal (even if it doesn’t include chocolate) or taking the four-legged love of your life on an extra long walk.  And sharing love and appreciation on Valentine’s Day could also mean, stopping to chat with a neighbor, snuggling up on the couch with your best friend or kids to watch a movie marathon, or even appreciating your OWN heart by taking a yoga class or going for a run.

Love and happiness go hand-in-hand and have a wonderful way of being contagious!  So, to help celebrate this month of love, we at Localvore Today have come up with some pretty SWEET offers, tips and tidbits to help warm your heart and help you warm the heart of others.

Be sure to check out today’s offer for a Free Hug redeemable at any participating human! Print out the voucher and head to anyone mentioned on our Participating Human List (check back often ‘cause the list keeps growing!) and get a free hug!  We’re sure you’ll love it so much, you’ll want to give one right back!

We hope you have a wonderful day and want to know what YOUR favorite Valentine treat is!

P.S. We are REALLY good huggers!        

shutterstock_124397422When you think of Valentine’s Day you probably think about heart-shaped boxes of chocolates, expensive bunches of roses and a little extra time with that special someone.  Believe me, there’s nothing wrong with chocolates, no matter the shape of the box, and I always love to get flowers…but Valentine’s Day should be so much more! Just take a moment to think about it.  We, as a nation (along with many other nations around the world), have dedicated an entire day to celebrate love! How amazing is that?!? You might think that Valentine’s Day is just another holiday schemed up by marketing professionals to increase revenue, but it isn’t so! Although no one really knows when the first Valentine’s Day practices began nor who St. Valentine really was—the Catholic Church recognizes at least three saints named Valentine, all of whom were martyred—the day has been associated with giving loved ones candy, flowers and small gifts for centuries and the month of February has been associated with love for nearly a thousand years. And I think that’s great! A month dedicated to love can mean so much more than confections and dinners out.  Valentine’s Day can be a yearly reminder to make time to acknowledge, appreciate and indulge in the people, things and activities that truly warm our hearts and make us FEEL loved.  That could mean taking the time to write a note to your best childhood friend or spending an afternoon visiting with your grandma. It could mean making your husband or wife’s favorite meal (even if it doesn’t include chocolate) or taking the four-legged love of your life on an extra long walk.  And sharing love and appreciation on Valentine’s Day could also mean, stopping to chat with a neighbor, snuggling up on the couch with your best friend or kids to watch a movie marathon, or even appreciating your OWN heart by taking a yoga class or going for a run. Love and happiness go hand-in-hand and have a wonderful way of being contagious!  So, to help celebrate this month of love, we at Localvore Today have come up with some pretty SWEET offers, tips and tidbits to help warm your heart and help you warm the heart of others. Be sure to check out today’s offer for a Free Hug redeemable at any participating human! Print out the voucher and head to anyone mentioned on our Participating Human List (check back often ‘cause the list keeps growing!) and get a free hug!  We’re sure you’ll love it so much, you’ll want to give one right back! We hope you have a wonderful day and want to know what YOUR favorite Valentine treat is! P.S. We are REALLY good huggers!        ]]>
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Come One, Come All to Burlington’s 21st Annual Winter Festival this Saturday! https://www.localvoretoday.com/2013/02/01/come-one-come-all-to-burlingtons-21st-annual-winter-festival-this-saturday/ https://www.localvoretoday.com/2013/02/01/come-one-come-all-to-burlingtons-21st-annual-winter-festival-this-saturday/#comments Fri, 01 Feb 2013 13:30:59 +0000 https://www.localvoretoday.com/?p=36208 Team Vermont's Winning Sculpture 2012[/caption]

In just the past week alone, we've gone from sub-zero temperatures and clear blue skies to large puffy flakes and supper slick streets to down right balmy temperatures, light jackets and mud deep enough to lose a small dog in!  WInter in Vermont can be crazy.  And there's no better way to celebrate that craziness and the joy of winter than by checking out the fun, activities and deals of Burlington's Annual Winter Festival.

Organized by Burlington's Parks and Recreation Department, the Winter Festival offers something for everyone.  Activities include Vermont's own sanctioned snow sculpting competition at Waterfront Park, family fun activities at the waterfront's ECHO center (with a special admission fee of only $4 per person to help celebrate the day), the Kids Vermont Camp and School Fair at the Hilton Hotel, amazing deals at local stores and restaurants on Church St, and of course, the Penguin Plunge, during which you get to watch 1300+ brave and crazy Vermonters  jump into Lake Champlain to raise support and awareness for Vermont's 1054 Special Olympic athletes! Are you going to be participating in this year's Winter Festival?  We want to hear about it!  Let us know where you'll be and what you'll be up to.  Share pictures too!  We'll be sure to check you out!]]>

Team Vermont’s Winning Sculpture 2012

In just the past week alone, we’ve gone from sub-zero temperatures and clear blue skies to large puffy flakes and supper slick streets to down right balmy temperatures, light jackets and mud deep enough to lose a small dog in!  WInter in Vermont can be crazy.  And there’s no better way to celebrate that craziness and the joy of winter than by checking out the fun, activities and deals of Burlington’s Annual Winter Festival.

Organized by Burlington’s Parks and Recreation Department, the Winter Festival offers something for everyone.  Activities include Vermont’s own sanctioned snow sculpting competition at Waterfront Park, family fun activities at the waterfront’s ECHO center (with a special admission fee of only $4 per person to help celebrate the day), the Kids Vermont Camp and School Fair at the Hilton Hotel, amazing deals at local stores and restaurants on Church St, and of course, the Penguin Plunge, during which you get to watch 1300+ brave and crazy Vermonters  jump into Lake Champlain to raise support and awareness for Vermont’s 1054 Special Olympic athletes!

Are you going to be participating in this year’s Winter Festival?  We want to hear about it!  Let us know where you’ll be and what you’ll be up to.  Share pictures too!  We’ll be sure to check you out!

[caption id="attachment_34591" align="alignleft" width="224"] Team Vermont's Winning Sculpture 2012[/caption]

In just the past week alone, we've gone from sub-zero temperatures and clear blue skies to large puffy flakes and supper slick streets to down right balmy temperatures, light jackets and mud deep enough to lose a small dog in!  WInter in Vermont can be crazy.  And there's no better way to celebrate that craziness and the joy of winter than by checking out the fun, activities and deals of Burlington's Annual Winter Festival.

Organized by Burlington's Parks and Recreation Department, the Winter Festival offers something for everyone.  Activities include Vermont's own sanctioned snow sculpting competition at Waterfront Park, family fun activities at the waterfront's ECHO center (with a special admission fee of only $4 per person to help celebrate the day), the Kids Vermont Camp and School Fair at the Hilton Hotel, amazing deals at local stores and restaurants on Church St, and of course, the Penguin Plunge, during which you get to watch 1300+ brave and crazy Vermonters  jump into Lake Champlain to raise support and awareness for Vermont's 1054 Special Olympic athletes! Are you going to be participating in this year's Winter Festival?  We want to hear about it!  Let us know where you'll be and what you'll be up to.  Share pictures too!  We'll be sure to check you out!]]>
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Winterfest and Snow Sculpting! https://www.localvoretoday.com/2013/01/25/winterfest-and-snow-sculpting/ https://www.localvoretoday.com/2013/01/25/winterfest-and-snow-sculpting/#comments Fri, 25 Jan 2013 09:00:52 +0000 https://www.localvoretoday.com/?p=34590 My name is Michael and I am the lead tech here at Localvore Today. I am also the team captain of the current US National Snow Sculpting Team. My team and I competed in and won the US National Snow Sculpting Competition in Lake Geneva Wisconsin last year. It's the first time a team from Vermont has won the event in the 12 years Vermont has been sending teams. I witnessed the Vermont State Snow Sculpting competition in 1998 on the waterfront as part of Winterfest. Sculpture has always been a hobby of mine and I was amazed at how large and how fast the snow sculptures came along as I watched them progress over the weekend. I was also amazed at the level of detail one could get with snow. After questioning one of the teams I learned that the snow was packed into boxes and stomped on to get it to be consistent. I also learned that all you need to do to apply was submit a sketch and be willing to brave the cold. So I waited a year and entered the competition. Armed with dollar store chisels and spatulas from the kitchen. myself and two of my artist friends made a woman drinking champagne on top of a tortoise. I wanted hint at some sort of mythology. The first place prize was entrance into the National competition. My team came in second and the first place team couldn't go, so we ended up going, and having a great time. That was in 1999. Since that time we have gone to nationals 8 times, came in second at that event twice and last year we came in first. One of the neat things about the US Nationals is that the competitors themselves are the judges - so its extra nice to get the nod from your fellow competitors. We have also competed in international competitions in Breckenridge CO, and have been invited to competitions around the world. I think I have made about 38 large scale snow sculptures in the past 12 years. For something that I call a hobby it really has some legs! What I like about snow sculpture is the ability to make a very large piece in a matter of days. With wood or stone or metal it takes weeks, months or years. With snow you can make something 12 feet tall in hours. I have been seeing shapes that are 12 feet tall in my head ever since I can remember. so this helps get them out of my head into the real world, albeit temporarily. One other thing I like about snow sculpture  and sculpture in general is: I like the way my thoughts progress when I think about it. Following steps and shapes in 3 dimensional planes to achieve a desired effect in my mind is similar to the thought process I have when thinking about programming logic, and I like to think about complex logistics and problem solving - it makes me happy. But enough about me - Two things you should know! Winterfest in Burlington is next weekend! You should bundle up and check it out! You can follow my team's shenanigans on Facebook or on our website vermontsnows.com - we are having a fundraising party (snow sculpting is NOT a revenue generating activity - it's hard to sell them!) Saturday night from 7 to 9 at the Arts Riot studio - we will be showing a excerpt from some documentaries we have been in and giving away buttons and such. Thanks and stay warm! Michael]]> My name is Michael and I am the lead tech here at Localvore Today. I am also the team captain of the current US National Snow Sculpting Team. My team and I competed in and won the US National Snow Sculpting Competition in Lake Geneva Wisconsin last year. It’s the first time a team from Vermont has won the event in the 12 years Vermont has been sending teams.

I witnessed the Vermont State Snow Sculpting competition in 1998 on the waterfront as part of Winterfest. Sculpture has always been a hobby of mine and I was amazed at how large and how fast the snow sculptures came along as I watched them progress over the weekend. I was also amazed at the level of detail one could get with snow. After questioning one of the teams I learned that the snow was packed into boxes and stomped on to get it to be consistent. I also learned that all you need to do to apply was submit a sketch and be willing to brave the cold.

So I waited a year and entered the competition. Armed with dollar store chisels and spatulas from the kitchen. myself and two of my artist friends made a woman drinking champagne on top of a tortoise. I wanted hint at some sort of mythology.

The first place prize was entrance into the National competition. My team came in second and the first place team couldn’t go, so we ended up going, and having a great time. That was in 1999. Since that time we have gone to nationals 8 times, came in second at that event twice and last year we came in first. One of the neat things about the US Nationals is that the competitors themselves are the judges – so its extra nice to get the nod from your fellow competitors.

We have also competed in international competitions in Breckenridge CO, and have been invited to competitions around the world. I think I have made about 38 large scale snow sculptures in the past 12 years. For something that I call a hobby it really has some legs!

What I like about snow sculpture is the ability to make a very large piece in a matter of days. With wood or stone or metal it takes weeks, months or years. With snow you can make something 12 feet tall in hours. I have been seeing shapes that are 12 feet tall in my head ever since I can remember. so this helps get them out of my head into the real world, albeit temporarily.

One other thing I like about snow sculpture  and sculpture in general is: I like the way my thoughts progress when I think about it. Following steps and shapes in 3 dimensional planes to achieve a desired effect in my mind is similar to the thought process I have when thinking about programming logic, and I like to think about complex logistics and problem solving – it makes me happy.

But enough about me – Two things you should know! Winterfest in Burlington is next weekend! You should bundle up and check it out!

You can follow my team’s shenanigans on Facebook or on our website vermontsnows.com – we are having a fundraising party (snow sculpting is NOT a revenue generating activity – it’s hard to sell them!) Saturday night from 7 to 9 at the Arts Riot studio – we will be showing a excerpt from some documentaries we have been in and giving away buttons and such.

Thanks and stay warm!

Michael

My name is Michael and I am the lead tech here at Localvore Today. I am also the team captain of the current US National Snow Sculpting Team. My team and I competed in and won the US National Snow Sculpting Competition in Lake Geneva Wisconsin last year. It's the first time a team from Vermont has won the event in the 12 years Vermont has been sending teams. I witnessed the Vermont State Snow Sculpting competition in 1998 on the waterfront as part of Winterfest. Sculpture has always been a hobby of mine and I was amazed at how large and how fast the snow sculptures came along as I watched them progress over the weekend. I was also amazed at the level of detail one could get with snow. After questioning one of the teams I learned that the snow was packed into boxes and stomped on to get it to be consistent. I also learned that all you need to do to apply was submit a sketch and be willing to brave the cold. So I waited a year and entered the competition. Armed with dollar store chisels and spatulas from the kitchen. myself and two of my artist friends made a woman drinking champagne on top of a tortoise. I wanted hint at some sort of mythology. The first place prize was entrance into the National competition. My team came in second and the first place team couldn't go, so we ended up going, and having a great time. That was in 1999. Since that time we have gone to nationals 8 times, came in second at that event twice and last year we came in first. One of the neat things about the US Nationals is that the competitors themselves are the judges - so its extra nice to get the nod from your fellow competitors. We have also competed in international competitions in Breckenridge CO, and have been invited to competitions around the world. I think I have made about 38 large scale snow sculptures in the past 12 years. For something that I call a hobby it really has some legs! What I like about snow sculpture is the ability to make a very large piece in a matter of days. With wood or stone or metal it takes weeks, months or years. With snow you can make something 12 feet tall in hours. I have been seeing shapes that are 12 feet tall in my head ever since I can remember. so this helps get them out of my head into the real world, albeit temporarily. One other thing I like about snow sculpture  and sculpture in general is: I like the way my thoughts progress when I think about it. Following steps and shapes in 3 dimensional planes to achieve a desired effect in my mind is similar to the thought process I have when thinking about programming logic, and I like to think about complex logistics and problem solving - it makes me happy. But enough about me - Two things you should know! Winterfest in Burlington is next weekend! You should bundle up and check it out! You can follow my team's shenanigans on Facebook or on our website vermontsnows.com - we are having a fundraising party (snow sculpting is NOT a revenue generating activity - it's hard to sell them!) Saturday night from 7 to 9 at the Arts Riot studio - we will be showing a excerpt from some documentaries we have been in and giving away buttons and such. Thanks and stay warm! Michael]]>
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My, Oh My! It’s Cold Outside! What is a Localvore to Do?!? https://www.localvoretoday.com/2013/01/23/my-oh-my-its-cold-outside-what-is-a-localvore-to-do/ https://www.localvoretoday.com/2013/01/23/my-oh-my-its-cold-outside-what-is-a-localvore-to-do/#comments Wed, 23 Jan 2013 23:42:13 +0000 https://www.localvoretoday.com/?p=34463  Tips for finding local flavors during winter’s coldest months. Just this morning, I sweetened up my morning smoothie with the last—the very very last—bag of frozen berries that my kids and I picked at Adam’s Berry farm in the Intervale this past summer.  I usually ration those precious bags of frozen summer sunshine out until mid-February; but this year, I didn’t make it—they were just THAT good! I may mourn the last of my handpicked frozen berries and the warm memories of sunny days and blueberry-stained mouths that were frozen along with them, but I won’t have to suffer for long!  Vermont isn’t an utter fresh food wasteland in winter!  In fact, when you know where to look, you’ll discover a cornucopia of local delights that not only use local ingredients, but also bring out the full potential of those ingredients by utilizing them during the winter months and in new ways. Eating as a locavore (yes, I DID leave off the “l”), defined as a person who eats locally grown food, as much as possible, can be a struggle for those of us who live in cold winter climates where fresh ingredients are few and far between. Being committed to consuming local produce means that I preserve and store as much of the summer and fall harvests as I can by freezing, canning, drying and root cellaring.  But between the busyness of work, family and fun, I often fall far short of my ambitions!  Luckily, here in Vermont, we have a community filled with vibrant and dedicated locavores whose great planning and know-how make it easy to keep enjoying local ingredients even when my personal stores run dry. Hooray for CSAs! One of the best ways to take advantage of what the winter months have to offer is by joining a winter CSA.  Although the terms of membership and products supplied differ from one farm to another, one of my favorite benefits of being part of a CSA is that it has helped me discover, cook and eat a great variety of new foods that I often don’t even notice in the grocery store.  For example, I had never even thought about buying root vegetables before joining a winter CSA, but when a box of nearly 30 pounds of carrots, parsnips, sweet potatoes, beets and rutabagas showed up at my doorstep, I opened the door to a new world of vibrant colors, tastes and textures! “What do you do with a rutabaga the size of your head?” I wondered.  Well, I roasted, grated, baked, stewed, fried and dehydrated for weeks, and I ended up with loads of new recipes for soups, breads, wraps and chips—some of which turned out not to be keepers, others of which have become winter staples!  The winter harvest has become a sort of whole family project.  My daughter is the Mix Master—she loves to see what happens when we combine ingredients.  The cheddar /apple muffins were a surprising hit!  The sweet potato beet juice was for a more discerning pallet!  My six yr old son is the self-proclaimed King of the dehydrator and loves to see what how things taste and look when they’re all dried up.  We even use our dehydrator to use up our fruit when it is past its prime—we make strings of dehydrated berries, apples and citrus and hang them out for the birds. For more information about Community Supported Agriculture, CSAs, check out the Northeast Organic Farming Association of Vermont’s website at nofavt.org.   Find Inspiration at the Winter Farmers’ Market! But for those of us who have trouble planning ahead—most CSAs require members to join early in the season-- or for those of us who want to add more variety to our plates without being oh so adventurous, the local Winter Farmers’ Markets are a virtual playground! The Burlington Farmers’ Market hosts over 50 vendors every other Saturday from November through April and offers a surprising array of hearty produce, prepared foods, crafts and other specialty items.  I am easily dazzled by the bright colors and mouth watering juiciness of local produce in the summer, but the Winter Famers’ Market transforms those same gorgeous tomatoes into spicy salsas and rich sauces; those same bright berries into jellies and jams and muffins!  It’s a great place to find yarn made from local sheep or dyed with locally sourced dyes; artisanal soaps made from local goats milk; medicinal tonics and herbs grown in Vermont fields; and purses, tote bags, pottery, cards, jewelry and much much more all handmade by Vermonters! In addition to the great array of Vermont products available at the Winter Farmers’ Markets, I also love checking them out because they are a great way to warm up and reconnect with local farmers.  It’s a great way to stay connected to my community, environment and maybe even get a back story to some of the items I buy.  I love to hear when a necklace was inspired by the artists’ daughter’s love of ladybugs, for example, or that the sketch of a rabbit on a bundle of handmade cards is a portrait of the crafty critter who ate all of the spinach out of artist’s garden last spring! For a great list of both summer and winter Farmers’ Markets, where to find them, view a schedule and learn about participating vendors, visit vermontagriculture.com.   Simply Support Like-Minded Businesses! But perhaps, the easiest way to continue being a locavore during cold winter months is to support local businesses that are dedicated to utilizing as many locally sourced items as they can.  It makes me feel good to buy a delicious sandwich that is made with bread from a local bakery, an omelet made from local eggs, or a cake adorned with frosting made with local cream!  When I support local businesses that share my belief in the importance of using local ingredients by giving them my business, I not only get to enjoy delicious food, but also get to support community and local economy as well!  And THAT’s pretty darn awesome! For more information on and to find a list of members of the Vermont Fresh Network, an organization dedicated to building relationships between farmers, chefs and the consumer, visit http://www.vermontfresh.net.   Hey Localvores!  What’s YOUR favorite way to enjoy Vermont’s winter harvest?  We want to know!!        ]]>  Tips for finding local flavors during winter’s coldest months.

Just this morning, I sweetened up my morning smoothie with the last—the very very last—bag of frozen berries that my kids and I picked at Adam’s Berry farm in the Intervale this past summer.  I usually ration those precious bags of frozen summer sunshine out until mid-February; but this year, I didn’t make it—they were just THAT good!

I may mourn the last of my handpicked frozen berries and the warm memories of sunny days and blueberry-stained mouths that were frozen along with them, but I won’t have to suffer for long!  Vermont isn’t an utter fresh food wasteland in winter!  In fact, when you know where to look, you’ll discover a cornucopia of local delights that not only use local ingredients, but also bring out the full potential of those ingredients by utilizing them during the winter months and in new ways.

Eating as a locavore (yes, I DID leave off the “l”), defined as a person who eats locally grown food, as much as possible, can be a struggle for those of us who live in cold winter climates where fresh ingredients are few and far between. Being committed to consuming local produce means that I preserve and store as much of the summer and fall harvests as I can by freezing, canning, drying and root cellaring.  But between the busyness of work, family and fun, I often fall far short of my ambitions!  Luckily, here in Vermont, we have a community filled with vibrant and dedicated locavores whose great planning and know-how make it easy to keep enjoying local ingredients even when my personal stores run dry.

Hooray for CSAs!

One of the best ways to take advantage of what the winter months have to offer is by joining a winter CSA.  Although the terms of membership and products supplied differ from one farm to another, one of my favorite benefits of being part of a CSA is that it has helped me discover, cook and eat a great variety of new foods that I often don’t even notice in the grocery store.  For example, I had never even thought about buying root vegetables before joining a winter CSA, but when a box of nearly 30 pounds of carrots, parsnips, sweet potatoes, beets and rutabagas showed up at my doorstep, I opened the door to a new world of vibrant colors, tastes and textures! “What do you do with a rutabaga the size of your head?” I wondered.  Well, I roasted, grated, baked, stewed, fried and dehydrated for weeks, and I ended up with loads of new recipes for soups, breads, wraps and chips—some of which turned out not to be keepers, others of which have become winter staples!  The winter harvest has become a sort of whole family project.  My daughter is the Mix Master—she loves to see what happens when we combine ingredients.  The cheddar /apple muffins were a surprising hit!  The sweet potato beet juice was for a more discerning pallet!  My six yr old son is the self-proclaimed King of the dehydrator and loves to see what how things taste and look when they’re all dried up.  We even use our dehydrator to use up our fruit when it is past its prime—we make strings of dehydrated berries, apples and citrus and hang them out for the birds.

For more information about Community Supported Agriculture, CSAs, check out the Northeast Organic Farming Association of Vermont’s website at nofavt.org.

 

Find Inspiration at the Winter Farmers’ Market!

But for those of us who have trouble planning ahead—most CSAs require members to join early in the season– or for those of us who want to add more variety to our plates without being oh so adventurous, the local Winter Farmers’ Markets are a virtual playground!

The Burlington Farmers’ Market hosts over 50 vendors every other Saturday from November through April and offers a surprising array of hearty produce, prepared foods, crafts and other specialty items.  I am easily dazzled by the bright colors and mouth watering juiciness of local produce in the summer, but the Winter Famers’ Market transforms those same gorgeous tomatoes into spicy salsas and rich sauces; those same bright berries into jellies and jams and muffins!  It’s a great place to find yarn made from local sheep or dyed with locally sourced dyes; artisanal soaps made from local goats milk; medicinal tonics and herbs grown in Vermont fields; and purses, tote bags, pottery, cards, jewelry and much much more all handmade by Vermonters!

In addition to the great array of Vermont products available at the Winter Farmers’ Markets, I also love checking them out because they are a great way to warm up and reconnect with local farmers.  It’s a great way to stay connected to my community, environment and maybe even get a back story to some of the items I buy.  I love to hear when a necklace was inspired by the artists’ daughter’s love of ladybugs, for example, or that the sketch of a rabbit on a bundle of handmade cards is a portrait of the crafty critter who ate all of the spinach out of artist’s garden last spring!

For a great list of both summer and winter Farmers’ Markets, where to find them, view a schedule and learn about participating vendors, visit vermontagriculture.com.

 

Simply Support Like-Minded Businesses!

But perhaps, the easiest way to continue being a locavore during cold winter months is to support local businesses that are dedicated to utilizing as many locally sourced items as they can.  It makes me feel good to buy a delicious sandwich that is made with bread from a local bakery, an omelet made from local eggs, or a cake adorned with frosting made with local cream!  When I support local businesses that share my belief in the importance of using local ingredients by giving them my business, I not only get to enjoy delicious food, but also get to support community and local economy as well!  And THAT’s pretty darn awesome!

For more information on and to find a list of members of the Vermont Fresh Network, an organization dedicated to building relationships between farmers, chefs and the consumer, visit http://www.vermontfresh.net.

 

Hey Localvores!  What’s YOUR favorite way to enjoy Vermont’s winter harvest?  We want to know!!

 

 

 

 

 Tips for finding local flavors during winter’s coldest months. Just this morning, I sweetened up my morning smoothie with the last—the very very last—bag of frozen berries that my kids and I picked at Adam’s Berry farm in the Intervale this past summer.  I usually ration those precious bags of frozen summer sunshine out until mid-February; but this year, I didn’t make it—they were just THAT good! I may mourn the last of my handpicked frozen berries and the warm memories of sunny days and blueberry-stained mouths that were frozen along with them, but I won’t have to suffer for long!  Vermont isn’t an utter fresh food wasteland in winter!  In fact, when you know where to look, you’ll discover a cornucopia of local delights that not only use local ingredients, but also bring out the full potential of those ingredients by utilizing them during the winter months and in new ways. Eating as a locavore (yes, I DID leave off the “l”), defined as a person who eats locally grown food, as much as possible, can be a struggle for those of us who live in cold winter climates where fresh ingredients are few and far between. Being committed to consuming local produce means that I preserve and store as much of the summer and fall harvests as I can by freezing, canning, drying and root cellaring.  But between the busyness of work, family and fun, I often fall far short of my ambitions!  Luckily, here in Vermont, we have a community filled with vibrant and dedicated locavores whose great planning and know-how make it easy to keep enjoying local ingredients even when my personal stores run dry. Hooray for CSAs! One of the best ways to take advantage of what the winter months have to offer is by joining a winter CSA.  Although the terms of membership and products supplied differ from one farm to another, one of my favorite benefits of being part of a CSA is that it has helped me discover, cook and eat a great variety of new foods that I often don’t even notice in the grocery store.  For example, I had never even thought about buying root vegetables before joining a winter CSA, but when a box of nearly 30 pounds of carrots, parsnips, sweet potatoes, beets and rutabagas showed up at my doorstep, I opened the door to a new world of vibrant colors, tastes and textures! “What do you do with a rutabaga the size of your head?” I wondered.  Well, I roasted, grated, baked, stewed, fried and dehydrated for weeks, and I ended up with loads of new recipes for soups, breads, wraps and chips—some of which turned out not to be keepers, others of which have become winter staples!  The winter harvest has become a sort of whole family project.  My daughter is the Mix Master—she loves to see what happens when we combine ingredients.  The cheddar /apple muffins were a surprising hit!  The sweet potato beet juice was for a more discerning pallet!  My six yr old son is the self-proclaimed King of the dehydrator and loves to see what how things taste and look when they’re all dried up.  We even use our dehydrator to use up our fruit when it is past its prime—we make strings of dehydrated berries, apples and citrus and hang them out for the birds. For more information about Community Supported Agriculture, CSAs, check out the Northeast Organic Farming Association of Vermont’s website at nofavt.org.   Find Inspiration at the Winter Farmers’ Market! But for those of us who have trouble planning ahead—most CSAs require members to join early in the season-- or for those of us who want to add more variety to our plates without being oh so adventurous, the local Winter Farmers’ Markets are a virtual playground! The Burlington Farmers’ Market hosts over 50 vendors every other Saturday from November through April and offers a surprising array of hearty produce, prepared foods, crafts and other specialty items.  I am easily dazzled by the bright colors and mouth watering juiciness of local produce in the summer, but the Winter Famers’ Market transforms those same gorgeous tomatoes into spicy salsas and rich sauces; those same bright berries into jellies and jams and muffins!  It’s a great place to find yarn made from local sheep or dyed with locally sourced dyes; artisanal soaps made from local goats milk; medicinal tonics and herbs grown in Vermont fields; and purses, tote bags, pottery, cards, jewelry and much much more all handmade by Vermonters! In addition to the great array of Vermont products available at the Winter Farmers’ Markets, I also love checking them out because they are a great way to warm up and reconnect with local farmers.  It’s a great way to stay connected to my community, environment and maybe even get a back story to some of the items I buy.  I love to hear when a necklace was inspired by the artists’ daughter’s love of ladybugs, for example, or that the sketch of a rabbit on a bundle of handmade cards is a portrait of the crafty critter who ate all of the spinach out of artist’s garden last spring! For a great list of both summer and winter Farmers’ Markets, where to find them, view a schedule and learn about participating vendors, visit vermontagriculture.com.   Simply Support Like-Minded Businesses! But perhaps, the easiest way to continue being a locavore during cold winter months is to support local businesses that are dedicated to utilizing as many locally sourced items as they can.  It makes me feel good to buy a delicious sandwich that is made with bread from a local bakery, an omelet made from local eggs, or a cake adorned with frosting made with local cream!  When I support local businesses that share my belief in the importance of using local ingredients by giving them my business, I not only get to enjoy delicious food, but also get to support community and local economy as well!  And THAT’s pretty darn awesome! For more information on and to find a list of members of the Vermont Fresh Network, an organization dedicated to building relationships between farmers, chefs and the consumer, visit http://www.vermontfresh.net.   Hey Localvores!  What’s YOUR favorite way to enjoy Vermont’s winter harvest?  We want to know!!        ]]>
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Building Connections in the New Year https://www.localvoretoday.com/2013/01/07/building-connections-in-the-new-year/ https://www.localvoretoday.com/2013/01/07/building-connections-in-the-new-year/#comments Mon, 07 Jan 2013 15:40:42 +0000 https://www.localvoretoday.com/?p=29825 Happy 2013 Localvores!

2012 was a great year for Localvore Today.  It was the year we launched our website and finally started manifesting a long time dream of our company founder, Dan White.

From our very first days, we have been committed to enhancing and celebrating our local Vermont community by connecting Vermonters with the vast array of local businesses, products and services that surround them. Yes, we strive to offer Vermonters great deals on local goods.  And yes, we also work very hard to help local businesses find and keep new customers.  But additionally, we aim to help forge connections!  For we believe that what really adds richness to a community are the connections and relationships that exist between its members.

We are thrilled to be able to craft some smokin’ offers toward amazing local businesses—to help you take a new class, try a new restaurant or give yourself or someone else a gift to a local service that you’ve so frequently considered but never actually tried.  But we also hope to help you get to know the person behind those services, the hard work and talent behind those products and build a deeper connection to the people, businesses and resources around you.

To get the New Year off to a great start, we’ve packed our January schedule with offers, tips and tidbits aimed at helping everyone warm up, rejuvenate and have fun in the snow!

Thank you for your continued support and feedback as we have gotten our company off the ground.  We’re here for you Localvores! And we wish you all the best in 2013!!

Happy 2013 Localvores! 2012 was a great year for Localvore Today.  It was the year we launched our website and finally started manifesting a long time dream of our company founder, Dan White. From our very first days, we have been committed to enhancing and celebrating our local Vermont community by connecting Vermonters with the vast array of local businesses, products and services that surround them. Yes, we strive to offer Vermonters great deals on local goods.  And yes, we also work very hard to help local businesses find and keep new customers.  But additionally, we aim to help forge connections!  For we believe that what really adds richness to a community are the connections and relationships that exist between its members. We are thrilled to be able to craft some smokin’ offers toward amazing local businesses—to help you take a new class, try a new restaurant or give yourself or someone else a gift to a local service that you’ve so frequently considered but never actually tried.  But we also hope to help you get to know the person behind those services, the hard work and talent behind those products and build a deeper connection to the people, businesses and resources around you. To get the New Year off to a great start, we’ve packed our January schedule with offers, tips and tidbits aimed at helping everyone warm up, rejuvenate and have fun in the snow! Thank you for your continued support and feedback as we have gotten our company off the ground.  We’re here for you Localvores! And we wish you all the best in 2013!!]]>
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Embracing the Wisdom of Winter https://www.localvoretoday.com/2012/12/21/embracing-the-wisdom-of-winter/ https://www.localvoretoday.com/2012/12/21/embracing-the-wisdom-of-winter/#comments Fri, 21 Dec 2012 14:34:38 +0000 https://www.localvoretoday.com/?p=28001 The heart of the holiday season is upon us, and like a tidal wave ready to crest, it can leave me feeling like I’m on the brink of drowning in a sea of To DO tasks, a cascade of school parties and a relentless stream of holiday music piped through every speaker. “It’s the hap-happiest season of all,” Andy Williams keeps telling me, with “much mistltoeing and hearts [all a]glowing,” he says, again and again. But why is it that the season of giving leaves me feeling so personally depleted, I wonder.  Why is my mood as flat and grey as the late December sky? Despite the holiday cheeriness that abounds, for many people, the weeks around Christmas are tough ones.  Not only does the holiday hustle and bustle come to its frenetic peak, but it also, marks the Winter Solstice, the first day of winter and the shortest day of the year. Here in Vermont, that means we’ll see just under nine hours of sunlight today. And because of the tilt of the earth’s axis, today also marks the time of the year when more energy actually escapes from the Earth than comes in from the sun.  Geesh!  No wonder I feel like a slug! But for the thousands of generations of humans that existed before the invention of artificial illumination, the onset of winter was a time of celebration, not a time of gloom.  It marked the forthcoming end of cold weather, hunger and darkness.  It signaled the gradual shifting of seasons toward warmth, renewed growth and the gradual return of sunlight…beautiful sunlight!  It was and still is a time of hope, a time to seek and praise light, amidst the cold winter darkness. Today, we honor light by brightening our tables with flickering flames, placing candles in our windows, and adorning barren tree branches with strings of glistening lights.  There is something truly magical about seeing thousands of tiny white lights strung from limb to limb or street pole to street pole, hovering like stars in the night sky. And whether you celebrate Hanukkah or Christmas or some modern combination of the two, our holiday traditions have taught us to create light and warmth in other ways during this time of year as well.  We warm our hearts by gathering together to sing songs of the season to our neighbors.  We send cards to connect with friends and family members we may not even speak to the rest of the year.  We glue glitter to star-shaped cardboard cutouts and hang them on trees and wreaths we set up in the middle of our living rooms.  We gather together in front of a fire; we feast and laugh and pray and play. And we bake loads of sweet treats and give gifts to remind one another that even in the barren December landscape there is abundance! But that abundance doesn’t need to come from a store.  It doesn’t need to be purchased or imported from China.  That abundance surrounds us right here in Vermont and if we look closely, winter helps show us that.  The colder days and longer nights may seem like a drag while memories of plush gardens, green grass and golden leaves are still fresh and vibrant in our memories.  But once those golden leaves fall to the ground and cold weather settles in, the Vermont landscape offers treats of a different sort.  The bare branches of deciduous trees makes it easier to spot the tough little birds who stay put through the winter and to notice bushes and evergreens that might get lost in lush warmer months. The cooler darker days of winter offer a gift of another sort as well.  It is a time to slow down a bit, turn inward, and cuddle.  Like bulbs buried deep underground, it’s a time for all living things to withdraw and conserve energy to enable new growth in the spring. It’s a time to think about things, to read more and find warmth in warm drinks and find light in ideas and conversations. If I don’t work against the natural rhythm of the season by trying to buy too many gifts, mail too many packages and cram all of my family fun time into parties and sleigh rides and tie it all up in a bow—if I embrace the natural wisdom of this wonderful state we live in, perhaps it will be easier to remember what the heart of the holiday season is really all about.    ]]>

The heart of the holiday season is upon us, and like a tidal wave ready to crest, it can leave me feeling like I’m on the brink of drowning in a sea of To DO tasks, a cascade of school parties and a relentless stream of holiday music piped through every speaker.

“It’s the hap-happiest season of all,” Andy Williams keeps telling me, with “much mistltoeing and hearts [all a]glowing,” he says, again and again. But why is it that the season of giving leaves me feeling so personally depleted, I wonder.  Why is my mood as flat and grey as the late December sky?

Despite the holiday cheeriness that abounds, for many people, the weeks around Christmas are tough ones.  Not only does the holiday hustle and bustle come to its frenetic peak, but it also, marks the Winter Solstice, the first day of winter and the shortest day of the year. Here in Vermont, that means we’ll see just under nine hours of sunlight today. And because of the tilt of the earth’s axis, today also marks the time of the year when more energy actually escapes from the Earth than comes in from the sun.  Geesh!  No wonder I feel like a slug!

But for the thousands of generations of humans that existed before the invention of artificial illumination, the onset of winter was a time of celebration, not a time of gloom.  It marked the forthcoming end of cold weather, hunger and darkness.  It signaled the gradual shifting of seasons toward warmth, renewed growth and the gradual return of sunlight…beautiful sunlight!  It was and still is a time of hope, a time to seek and praise light, amidst the cold winter darkness. Today, we honor light by brightening our tables with flickering flames, placing candles in our windows, and adorning barren tree branches with strings of glistening lights.  There is something truly magical about seeing thousands of tiny white lights strung from limb to limb or street pole to street pole, hovering like stars in the night sky.

And whether you celebrate Hanukkah or Christmas or some modern combination of the two, our holiday traditions have taught us to create light and warmth in other ways during this time of year as well.  We warm our hearts by gathering together to sing songs of the season to our neighbors.  We send cards to connect with friends and family members we may not even speak to the rest of the year.  We glue glitter to star-shaped cardboard cutouts and hang them on trees and wreaths we set up in the middle of our living rooms.  We gather together in front of a fire; we feast and laugh and pray and play. And we bake loads of sweet treats and give gifts to remind one another that even in the barren December landscape there is abundance!

But that abundance doesn’t need to come from a store.  It doesn’t need to be purchased or imported from China.  That abundance surrounds us right here in Vermont and if we look closely, winter helps show us that.  The colder days and longer nights may seem like a drag while memories of plush gardens, green grass and golden leaves are still fresh and vibrant in our memories.  But once those golden leaves fall to the ground and cold weather settles in, the Vermont landscape offers treats of a different sort.  The bare branches of deciduous trees makes it easier to spot the tough little birds who stay put through the winter and to notice bushes and evergreens that might get lost in lush warmer months.

The cooler darker days of winter offer a gift of another sort as well.  It is a time to slow down a bit, turn inward, and cuddle.  Like bulbs buried deep underground, it’s a time for all living things to withdraw and conserve energy to enable new growth in the spring. It’s a time to think about things, to read more and find warmth in warm drinks and find light in ideas and conversations. If I don’t work against the natural rhythm of the season by trying to buy too many gifts, mail too many packages and cram all of my family fun time into parties and sleigh rides and tie it all up in a bow—if I embrace the natural wisdom of this wonderful state we live in, perhaps it will be easier to remember what the heart of the holiday season is really all about.

 

 

The heart of the holiday season is upon us, and like a tidal wave ready to crest, it can leave me feeling like I’m on the brink of drowning in a sea of To DO tasks, a cascade of school parties and a relentless stream of holiday music piped through every speaker. “It’s the hap-happiest season of all,” Andy Williams keeps telling me, with “much mistltoeing and hearts [all a]glowing,” he says, again and again. But why is it that the season of giving leaves me feeling so personally depleted, I wonder.  Why is my mood as flat and grey as the late December sky? Despite the holiday cheeriness that abounds, for many people, the weeks around Christmas are tough ones.  Not only does the holiday hustle and bustle come to its frenetic peak, but it also, marks the Winter Solstice, the first day of winter and the shortest day of the year. Here in Vermont, that means we’ll see just under nine hours of sunlight today. And because of the tilt of the earth’s axis, today also marks the time of the year when more energy actually escapes from the Earth than comes in from the sun.  Geesh!  No wonder I feel like a slug! But for the thousands of generations of humans that existed before the invention of artificial illumination, the onset of winter was a time of celebration, not a time of gloom.  It marked the forthcoming end of cold weather, hunger and darkness.  It signaled the gradual shifting of seasons toward warmth, renewed growth and the gradual return of sunlight…beautiful sunlight!  It was and still is a time of hope, a time to seek and praise light, amidst the cold winter darkness. Today, we honor light by brightening our tables with flickering flames, placing candles in our windows, and adorning barren tree branches with strings of glistening lights.  There is something truly magical about seeing thousands of tiny white lights strung from limb to limb or street pole to street pole, hovering like stars in the night sky. And whether you celebrate Hanukkah or Christmas or some modern combination of the two, our holiday traditions have taught us to create light and warmth in other ways during this time of year as well.  We warm our hearts by gathering together to sing songs of the season to our neighbors.  We send cards to connect with friends and family members we may not even speak to the rest of the year.  We glue glitter to star-shaped cardboard cutouts and hang them on trees and wreaths we set up in the middle of our living rooms.  We gather together in front of a fire; we feast and laugh and pray and play. And we bake loads of sweet treats and give gifts to remind one another that even in the barren December landscape there is abundance! But that abundance doesn’t need to come from a store.  It doesn’t need to be purchased or imported from China.  That abundance surrounds us right here in Vermont and if we look closely, winter helps show us that.  The colder days and longer nights may seem like a drag while memories of plush gardens, green grass and golden leaves are still fresh and vibrant in our memories.  But once those golden leaves fall to the ground and cold weather settles in, the Vermont landscape offers treats of a different sort.  The bare branches of deciduous trees makes it easier to spot the tough little birds who stay put through the winter and to notice bushes and evergreens that might get lost in lush warmer months. The cooler darker days of winter offer a gift of another sort as well.  It is a time to slow down a bit, turn inward, and cuddle.  Like bulbs buried deep underground, it’s a time for all living things to withdraw and conserve energy to enable new growth in the spring. It’s a time to think about things, to read more and find warmth in warm drinks and find light in ideas and conversations. If I don’t work against the natural rhythm of the season by trying to buy too many gifts, mail too many packages and cram all of my family fun time into parties and sleigh rides and tie it all up in a bow—if I embrace the natural wisdom of this wonderful state we live in, perhaps it will be easier to remember what the heart of the holiday season is really all about.    ]]>
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New Servers, New Workflows https://www.localvoretoday.com/2012/11/04/new-servers-new-workflows/ https://www.localvoretoday.com/2012/11/04/new-servers-new-workflows/#comments Mon, 05 Nov 2012 01:15:23 +0000 https://www.localvoretoday.com/?p=14445 computers

We moved the site to a new server and made some subtle but hopefully effective changes to the workflow in an attempt to increase your happiness with the site! If you do experience an difficulty (which might happen with older links you might have to the site) please email us and let us know what is going on so we can provide a solutions!  ]]>
computers

We moved the site to a new server and made some subtle but hopefully effective changes to the workflow in an attempt to increase your happiness with the site! If you do experience an difficulty (which might happen with older links you might have to the site) please email us and let us know what is going on so we can provide a solutions!  ]]>
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Chef David Hoene on Buddhism, Wild Edibles, and Wine… https://www.localvoretoday.com/2012/10/12/chefhoene/ https://www.localvoretoday.com/2012/10/12/chefhoene/#comments Fri, 12 Oct 2012 15:04:50 +0000 http://www.localvoretoday.com/?p=10203 yum[/caption] Alright, I think it’s time to start blogging.­­­ I had a chat with my old friend David Hoene the other day.  David is the chef-owner of Pauline’s Café & Restaurant on Shelburne Road, in South Burlington.  He has long been a proponent of supporting local farms, producers and foragers.  David’s culinary journey began as a small child, living on the outskirts of Boise, Idaho.   Large family, small garden, “you could fish right outside of our back door…. certain times of the year, you could pull trout right outta there…. or I could walk out my back door and just go hunting anytime I wanted,” David shared with a reminiscent glow. Me: Not to over-romanticize where you learned to cook - but fishing, hunting, gathering and then cooking for your family - is that fair? David Hoene: “Yeah, pretty much.” Me: Awesome! DH: “The way my mother ran things, she divided all the chores up between the kids, and I did a lot of those chores, but I liked cooking.  So if my sisters didn’t want to cook, we’d trade chores and I’d cook…  and the other nice thing about cooking, is you get to eat a lot more of the food, tasting it along the way.” The wry smile returns, speaking a little under his breath as if his sister’s might hear him admitting his advantage and hold it against him. I’ve had the pleasure of tasting wine with David for years at restaurant industry tastings.  If there’s one thing you can’t teach and is even harder to learn, it’s a great palette.  You can study books for years on end, but it probably won’t change whether you can detect delicate and subtle nuances in flavors and aroma, whether food or wine. DH: “With wine, I really like to taste it with the mindset of ‘how’s this going to taste with food?’  So for the business, I want wines that are exceptionally good or even a good value, but mostly I want wines that don’t overpower the food… if they’re too big, or bitter, or tannic, that’s not really for me… if you go to Europe, everywhere you go, all the table wine is just so good, and it all goes with food.  That’s their whole approach, they don’t think of wine without food.” David has lived in Lincoln, Vermont since 1995 and started working at Pauline’s in 2000 before buying it from fellow Lincolnite Robert Fuller.  He lives in the picturesque foothills of Mount Abraham, within a meatballs toss from the Sunray Peace Village.  Sunray aims to preserve and share the teachings and spiritual practices of both Tibetan Buddhist tradition and Peacemaker practices of the Cherokee People. Me: How has your proximity to Sunray influenced your life, if at all? DH: It influences the way that I think about things.  It really makes one aware of the generosity practice, which is a good perspective to have – especially in the food business.  I mean, it’s probably the reason that I got into cooking in the first place, because I enjoyed seeing people enjoy the food I was making and really liked the simple caring aspects of giving warm food to people.  Taking care of someone who’s sick.  Making them a really nice bowl of soup… even as a young kid, I liked that. Getting into the industry a lot of that sense about food is manufactured out.  Just having that perspective always kind of keeps me grounded as to why the restaurant is here and what we’re really doing in serving people.  And it sort of tamps down the ego…. When you’re working as a chef there could be a lot of ego involved.  But it’s really about generosity and about sharing. And that’s why localvore, local foods… all that stuff really makes sense, because it creates a cycle of generosity.”  His words, not mine :) “And that was all really engrained in me as a kid.. but I kind of went away from that for a bit and coming back to a spiritual practice here in Vermont, really helped reestablish that for me, and it reminds me all the time to ask myself ‘what are you really doing here on the planet?” Me: So on a slamming Saturday night, peak foliage, tickets lined up against you and the little machine pumping out new orders that you can’t even take the time to look at, cuz you’re just buried, head down, cooking… can you take yourself out of that moment? DH: “No, you can’t…. but you gain perspective on it.” So, full disclosure, I worked at Pauline’s almost 10 years ago now, and it was really my first exposure to the Vermont Fresh Network and all these great farm-chef partnerships that were being formed in kitchens across the state.  I think I can honestly say that Pauline’s is where I really started to develop my passion for food and wine.  And here I am, having worked in 3 more flagship VFN restaurants since that time and still in love with the industry, people, and product. But one of the biggest take-aways for me, working with David at Pauline’s, was the unscheduled visits from the mushroom foragers and wild-crafters.  Back then it was mostly Les and Nova Kim with beautiful chanterelles, ramps and fiddleheads.  Some combination of the poor economy and people realizing that money does actually grow on trees and here we are just a few years later - every Tom, Dick and Harry walking in with bags full of wild edibles.  What does this mean for the sustainability of wild edibles? DH: “I’m beginning to sense the need for a wild foods guild, like the one Les and Nova Kim have started, is more crucial than ever before.  All these people out there need some kind of sense of the picture they’re working on.  Frankly, I get a lot of guys coming in here, bringing stuff that they shouldn’t be harvesting.  And they’re trying to sell them to me and I’m stuck trying to educate them ‘You really shouldn’t have harvested that – you should have let it grow for 3, 5 more days and instead of a 10 pound mushroom, you know, maybe you’re coming in here with a 12, 15, 20 pound mushroom.’  ‘Well, I’m worried someone’s gonna take it’ is their response.” “Why is this person in this situation they’re in?  How could it be better for them?  What do they need to do to change the cycle?  What do I need to do to participate in changing the cycle?  Is it giving them education? Or making my demands even greater on what they’re supplying me? And then I wonder, why does each restaurant compete with each other on prices?  Why don't we establish a buying guild?” “All of these things would help establish a real vibrant economy, keep the money in Vermont, keep the jobs here, and a really keep a lot of interesting people in this area, too.” I think his questions are better than mine.  I hope some of our readers will attempt to answer them in the comments below. Thank you, David.  I will try to pay your generosity forward today.]]>

yum

Alright, I think it’s time to start blogging.­­­

I had a chat with my old friend David Hoene the other day.  David is the chef-owner of Pauline’s Café & Restaurant on Shelburne Road, in South Burlington.  He has long been a proponent of supporting local farms, producers and foragers.  David’s culinary journey began as a small child, living on the outskirts of Boise, Idaho.   Large family, small garden, “you could fish right outside of our back door…. certain times of the year, you could pull trout right outta there…. or I could walk out my back door and just go hunting anytime I wanted,” David shared with a reminiscent glow.

Me: Not to over-romanticize where you learned to cook – but fishing, hunting, gathering and then cooking for your family – is that fair?

David Hoene: “Yeah, pretty much.”

Me: Awesome!

DH: “The way my mother ran things, she divided all the chores up between the kids, and I did a lot of those chores, but I liked cooking.  So if my sisters didn’t want to cook, we’d trade chores and I’d cook…  and the other nice thing about cooking, is you get to eat a lot more of the food, tasting it along the way.”

The wry smile returns, speaking a little under his breath as if his sister’s might hear him admitting his advantage and hold it against him.

I’ve had the pleasure of tasting wine with David for years at restaurant industry tastings.  If there’s one thing you can’t teach and is even harder to learn, it’s a great palette.  You can study books for years on end, but it probably won’t change whether you can detect delicate and subtle nuances in flavors and aroma, whether food or wine.

DH: “With wine, I really like to taste it with the mindset of ‘how’s this going to taste with food?’  So for the business, I want wines that are exceptionally good or even a good value, but mostly I want wines that don’t overpower the food… if they’re too big, or bitter, or tannic, that’s not really for me… if you go to Europe, everywhere you go, all the table wine is just so good, and it all goes with food.  That’s their whole approach, they don’t think of wine without food.”

David has lived in Lincoln, Vermont since 1995 and started working at Pauline’s in 2000 before buying it from fellow Lincolnite Robert Fuller.  He lives in the picturesque foothills of Mount Abraham, within a meatballs toss from the Sunray Peace Village.  Sunray aims to preserve and share the teachings and spiritual practices of both Tibetan Buddhist tradition and Peacemaker practices of the Cherokee People.

Me: How has your proximity to Sunray influenced your life, if at all?

DH: It influences the way that I think about things.  It really makes one aware of the generosity practice, which is a good perspective to have – especially in the food business.  I mean, it’s probably the reason that I got into cooking in the first place, because I enjoyed seeing people enjoy the food I was making and really liked the simple caring aspects of giving warm food to people.  Taking care of someone who’s sick.  Making them a really nice bowl of soup… even as a young kid, I liked that.

Getting into the industry a lot of that sense about food is manufactured out.  Just having that perspective always kind of keeps me grounded as to why the restaurant is here and what we’re really doing in serving people.  And it sort of tamps down the ego…. When you’re working as a chef there could be a lot of ego involved.  But it’s really about generosity and about sharing.

And that’s why localvore, local foods… all that stuff really makes sense, because it creates a cycle of generosity.”  His words, not mine :)

“And that was all really engrained in me as a kid.. but I kind of went away from that for a bit and coming back to a spiritual practice here in Vermont, really helped reestablish that for me, and it reminds me all the time to ask myself ‘what are you really doing here on the planet?”

Me: So on a slamming Saturday night, peak foliage, tickets lined up against you and the little machine pumping out new orders that you can’t even take the time to look at, cuz you’re just buried, head down, cooking… can you take yourself out of that moment?

DH: “No, you can’t…. but you gain perspective on it.”

So, full disclosure, I worked at Pauline’s almost 10 years ago now, and it was really my first exposure to the Vermont Fresh Network and all these great farm-chef partnerships that were being formed in kitchens across the state.  I think I can honestly say that Pauline’s is where I really started to develop my passion for food and wine.  And here I am, having worked in 3 more flagship VFN restaurants since that time and still in love with the industry, people, and product.

But one of the biggest take-aways for me, working with David at Pauline’s, was the unscheduled visits from the mushroom foragers and wild-crafters.  Back then it was mostly Les and Nova Kim with beautiful chanterelles, ramps and fiddleheads.  Some combination of the poor economy and people realizing that money does actually grow on trees and here we are just a few years later – every Tom, Dick and Harry walking in with bags full of wild edibles.  What does this mean for the sustainability of wild edibles?

DH: “I’m beginning to sense the need for a wild foods guild, like the one Les and Nova Kim have started, is more crucial than ever before.  All these people out there need some kind of sense of the picture they’re working on.  Frankly, I get a lot of guys coming in here, bringing stuff that they shouldn’t be harvesting.  And they’re trying to sell them to me and I’m stuck trying to educate them ‘You really shouldn’t have harvested that – you should have let it grow for 3, 5 more days and instead of a 10 pound mushroom, you know, maybe you’re coming in here with a 12, 15, 20 pound mushroom.’  ‘Well, I’m worried someone’s gonna take it’ is their response.”

“Why is this person in this situation they’re in?  How could it be better for them?  What do they need to do to change the cycle?  What do I need to do to participate in changing the cycle?  Is it giving them education? Or making my demands even greater on what they’re supplying me?

And then I wonder, why does each restaurant compete with each other on prices?  Why don’t we establish a buying guild?”

“All of these things would help establish a real vibrant economy, keep the money in Vermont, keep the jobs here, and a really keep a lot of interesting people in this area, too.”

I think his questions are better than mine.  I hope some of our readers will attempt to answer them in the comments below.

Thank you, David.  I will try to pay your generosity forward today.

[caption id="attachment_10247" align="alignright" width="225"] yum[/caption] Alright, I think it’s time to start blogging.­­­ I had a chat with my old friend David Hoene the other day.  David is the chef-owner of Pauline’s Café & Restaurant on Shelburne Road, in South Burlington.  He has long been a proponent of supporting local farms, producers and foragers.  David’s culinary journey began as a small child, living on the outskirts of Boise, Idaho.   Large family, small garden, “you could fish right outside of our back door…. certain times of the year, you could pull trout right outta there…. or I could walk out my back door and just go hunting anytime I wanted,” David shared with a reminiscent glow. Me: Not to over-romanticize where you learned to cook - but fishing, hunting, gathering and then cooking for your family - is that fair? David Hoene: “Yeah, pretty much.” Me: Awesome! DH: “The way my mother ran things, she divided all the chores up between the kids, and I did a lot of those chores, but I liked cooking.  So if my sisters didn’t want to cook, we’d trade chores and I’d cook…  and the other nice thing about cooking, is you get to eat a lot more of the food, tasting it along the way.” The wry smile returns, speaking a little under his breath as if his sister’s might hear him admitting his advantage and hold it against him. I’ve had the pleasure of tasting wine with David for years at restaurant industry tastings.  If there’s one thing you can’t teach and is even harder to learn, it’s a great palette.  You can study books for years on end, but it probably won’t change whether you can detect delicate and subtle nuances in flavors and aroma, whether food or wine. DH: “With wine, I really like to taste it with the mindset of ‘how’s this going to taste with food?’  So for the business, I want wines that are exceptionally good or even a good value, but mostly I want wines that don’t overpower the food… if they’re too big, or bitter, or tannic, that’s not really for me… if you go to Europe, everywhere you go, all the table wine is just so good, and it all goes with food.  That’s their whole approach, they don’t think of wine without food.” David has lived in Lincoln, Vermont since 1995 and started working at Pauline’s in 2000 before buying it from fellow Lincolnite Robert Fuller.  He lives in the picturesque foothills of Mount Abraham, within a meatballs toss from the Sunray Peace Village.  Sunray aims to preserve and share the teachings and spiritual practices of both Tibetan Buddhist tradition and Peacemaker practices of the Cherokee People. Me: How has your proximity to Sunray influenced your life, if at all? DH: It influences the way that I think about things.  It really makes one aware of the generosity practice, which is a good perspective to have – especially in the food business.  I mean, it’s probably the reason that I got into cooking in the first place, because I enjoyed seeing people enjoy the food I was making and really liked the simple caring aspects of giving warm food to people.  Taking care of someone who’s sick.  Making them a really nice bowl of soup… even as a young kid, I liked that. Getting into the industry a lot of that sense about food is manufactured out.  Just having that perspective always kind of keeps me grounded as to why the restaurant is here and what we’re really doing in serving people.  And it sort of tamps down the ego…. When you’re working as a chef there could be a lot of ego involved.  But it’s really about generosity and about sharing. And that’s why localvore, local foods… all that stuff really makes sense, because it creates a cycle of generosity.”  His words, not mine :) “And that was all really engrained in me as a kid.. but I kind of went away from that for a bit and coming back to a spiritual practice here in Vermont, really helped reestablish that for me, and it reminds me all the time to ask myself ‘what are you really doing here on the planet?” Me: So on a slamming Saturday night, peak foliage, tickets lined up against you and the little machine pumping out new orders that you can’t even take the time to look at, cuz you’re just buried, head down, cooking… can you take yourself out of that moment? DH: “No, you can’t…. but you gain perspective on it.” So, full disclosure, I worked at Pauline’s almost 10 years ago now, and it was really my first exposure to the Vermont Fresh Network and all these great farm-chef partnerships that were being formed in kitchens across the state.  I think I can honestly say that Pauline’s is where I really started to develop my passion for food and wine.  And here I am, having worked in 3 more flagship VFN restaurants since that time and still in love with the industry, people, and product. But one of the biggest take-aways for me, working with David at Pauline’s, was the unscheduled visits from the mushroom foragers and wild-crafters.  Back then it was mostly Les and Nova Kim with beautiful chanterelles, ramps and fiddleheads.  Some combination of the poor economy and people realizing that money does actually grow on trees and here we are just a few years later - every Tom, Dick and Harry walking in with bags full of wild edibles.  What does this mean for the sustainability of wild edibles? DH: “I’m beginning to sense the need for a wild foods guild, like the one Les and Nova Kim have started, is more crucial than ever before.  All these people out there need some kind of sense of the picture they’re working on.  Frankly, I get a lot of guys coming in here, bringing stuff that they shouldn’t be harvesting.  And they’re trying to sell them to me and I’m stuck trying to educate them ‘You really shouldn’t have harvested that – you should have let it grow for 3, 5 more days and instead of a 10 pound mushroom, you know, maybe you’re coming in here with a 12, 15, 20 pound mushroom.’  ‘Well, I’m worried someone’s gonna take it’ is their response.” “Why is this person in this situation they’re in?  How could it be better for them?  What do they need to do to change the cycle?  What do I need to do to participate in changing the cycle?  Is it giving them education? Or making my demands even greater on what they’re supplying me? And then I wonder, why does each restaurant compete with each other on prices?  Why don't we establish a buying guild?” “All of these things would help establish a real vibrant economy, keep the money in Vermont, keep the jobs here, and a really keep a lot of interesting people in this area, too.” I think his questions are better than mine.  I hope some of our readers will attempt to answer them in the comments below. Thank you, David.  I will try to pay your generosity forward today.]]>
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Ch ch ch cha changes… https://www.localvoretoday.com/2012/09/03/ch-ch-ch-cha-changes/ https://www.localvoretoday.com/2012/09/03/ch-ch-ch-cha-changes/#comments Tue, 04 Sep 2012 02:49:35 +0000 https://www.localvoretoday.com/?p=2736 webmaster@localvoretoday.com. We actually have had some debates about whether to ditch the pop up or use the splash screen since we started building this... about a year ago now... We ended up ditching it. It might come back. The splash screen is the same amount of clicks to bypass - so... in essence it is the same thing. The web team always thinks in clicks - the usability team thinks in terms of slickness. Sometimes they get along. Sometimes we have to put them in separate offices. Some people have said the site is a bit slow to load - and we want to let you know we are working on that. We are also working on our share to earn feature and the mobile avenues. Stay tuned! Thank you- Team Localvore]]> If you visited our site last week, you might notice things look a little different this week. They act a little different too! Like any start up you gain a great deal of fast and furious knowledge about what people think of your site during the initial launch phase. We are taking that information and working toward making this the best experience for you. We want supporting local Vermont businesses to be fun and easy!

Got any feedback? We would love to hear it! Send it to webmaster@localvoretoday.com.

We actually have had some debates about whether to ditch the pop up or use the splash screen since we started building this… about a year ago now… We ended up ditching it. It might come back. The splash screen is the same amount of clicks to bypass – so… in essence it is the same thing. The web team always thinks in clicks – the usability team thinks in terms of slickness. Sometimes they get along. Sometimes we have to put them in separate offices.

Some people have said the site is a bit slow to load – and we want to let you know we are working on that.

We are also working on our share to earn feature and the mobile avenues. Stay tuned!

Thank you-

Team Localvore

If you visited our site last week, you might notice things look a little different this week. They act a little different too! Like any start up you gain a great deal of fast and furious knowledge about what people think of your site during the initial launch phase. We are taking that information and working toward making this the best experience for you. We want supporting local Vermont businesses to be fun and easy! Got any feedback? We would love to hear it! Send it to webmaster@localvoretoday.com. We actually have had some debates about whether to ditch the pop up or use the splash screen since we started building this... about a year ago now... We ended up ditching it. It might come back. The splash screen is the same amount of clicks to bypass - so... in essence it is the same thing. The web team always thinks in clicks - the usability team thinks in terms of slickness. Sometimes they get along. Sometimes we have to put them in separate offices. Some people have said the site is a bit slow to load - and we want to let you know we are working on that. We are also working on our share to earn feature and the mobile avenues. Stay tuned! Thank you- Team Localvore]]>
https://www.localvoretoday.com/2012/09/03/ch-ch-ch-cha-changes/feed/ 0
Local, Collective Ownership https://www.localvoretoday.com/2012/01/10/local-collective-ownership/ https://www.localvoretoday.com/2012/01/10/local-collective-ownership/#comments Tue, 10 Jan 2012 18:30:46 +0000 http://www.localvoretoday.com/welcome/?p=120 impossible to turn on the news without hearing a politician warning us darkly about a “socialist agenda” taking root in Washington. A historically loaded and negative term to the ears of most citizens, the fervor with which it has been slung in recent times recalls a ghost of the Red Scare. In reality, America, like any other country, benefits from many institutions that operate under the principles of collective, and often local, ownership. Take the public library, for example, which is a distinctly American invention of which few towns are without. So we are in a bit of a conundrum. While we all benefit from and make good use of collective resources, we at the same time are suspicious of the theory behind which they operate. Thus while on the one hand we deride the idea of universal healthcare as “socialized medicine,” we do not question the merit of public K-12 education, which, let's be honest, is really “socialized education.” It's certainly quite an interesting, confusing, and complicated public debate. That being said, I thought it could be worthwhile to investigate some uniquely American examples of collective ownership at work. The examples that follow include successful businesses, cooperative housing, sports teams, and even a prime example right here in Burlington. While the examples are wide-ranging, they follow a few basic principles: namely, they are locally-owned, and they are run cooperatively, with members having both a say in the decision making process, and a stake in their success or failure. So here goes: Recreational Equipment Incorporated This Seattle-based company is the largest consumer cooperative in the United States. Like other consumer cooperatives (such as City Market), members receive an annual check of 10% of what they spend per year at R.E.I., which can be used as credit or collected as cash. Other perks include discounts on rental equipment, member-only special deals, exclusive coupons, and more. The incentive for membership is clear, and the reward for the business is readily apparent; when a business, at least in part, belongs to you, you are that much more likely to spend your money there. Co-Op City In the northeast corner of NYC, in the Bronx, you can find Co-Op City, the single largest housing development in the United States. Made up of 15,372 residential units in 35 high rise buildings, this city-within-a-city boasts multiple schools, shopping centers, a power plant, daycare centers, parks, a movie theater, two newspapers, and just about anything else one could need. Co-Op City is run by a board elected by tenants of the complex. Moreover, it is a uniquely diverse community. Like any other housing cooperative, it's tenants own shares in the overall cooperative, and thus have more legal power over their apartments than tenants in a traditional owner/tenant situation. In an age in which renting is becoming more and more the norm, the cooperative alternative may be an appealing choice for many people. The Green Bay Packers As the NFL's only self-funded team, they are owned exclusively by their fans.  One of the greatest argument for collective ownership of a sports team, besides the obvious pride the fans have in owning a small fraction of the franchise, is the fact that when funding is required, say, for stadium improvements, that money is given voluntarily. When other teams need a stadium upgrade, it's taxpayers that usually foot the bill, whether they're fans or not. City Market Over a decade ago, Burlington was in the position of looking for a new grocery store to serve the downtown area. While many folks wanted a chain grocery such as Shaw's or Hannaford, others called for a more unique vision. eventually won out, of course. The Market differs from its' corporate counter-parts in a few ways: firstly, it offers a wealth of locally-produced food, which supports Vermont's farming communities. Second, it is a community-owned store, with over 7,000 members owning a share of the profits. As a member, you receive discounts on store purchases, but volunteering at the Co-Op guarantees even better discounts: 7% for two hours worked a month, and $12 for four. Once a year, a share of the profits are given back to you, depending on how much money you spent and how profitable the Market was. Decisions are decided by a board that is made up of community members. Every aspect of the market is community-owned. What could be more important than to have control over your community's source of food? Co-ops and other forms of community ownership are not without their flaws. Since board members are elected, decisions can occasionally be hard to reach, as is the case in any democratically-run institution. However, with more of a vested interest in a community, co-ops usually have the well-being of that community as a priority. Moreover, they suffer less from the heavy-handed top-down structure of traditional businesses and institutions, and capital is more equitably distributed. In an age in which CEOs and others at the top of companies regularly receive compensation many, many hundreds of times percent higher than employees lower on the totem poll, it's easy to see why a more cooperative approach is appealing. There is also something appealing in the concept of local ownership—in the case of City Market, for example, the powers that be are members of our own community, and not strangers sitting in offices out of state or even out of country. So collective ownership, as an economic concept, isn't as foreign as many today might make it out to be. Besides libraries and public education, as mentioned above, other institutions that fall under the umbrella of services we collectively pay for, vote on, and share the benefits of include parks, roads and transportation infrastructure, energy utilities, hospitals, police forces, firemen, and the military. It is possible, I believe, for a company, a sports team, a housing development, and a grocery store to both make money, share earnings in a more collective manner, reach decisions democratically (we certainly abide that principle when it comes to government—so why are we so quick to bemoan it when it comes to economics?), and operate with the interest of the community they serve as a priority. In an age in which terms like “socialism” are used by our politicians with such negativity, they would perhaps do well to open their eyes to the myriad ways we actually make use of both local and national collective ownership in this country.]]> These days, it’s nearly impossible to turn on the news without hearing a politician warning us darkly about a “socialist agenda” taking root in Washington. A historically loaded and negative term to the ears of most citizens, the fervor with which it has been slung in recent times recalls a ghost of the Red Scare. In reality, America, like any other country, benefits from many institutions that operate under the principles of collective, and often local, ownership. Take the public library, for example, which is a distinctly American invention of which few towns are without.

So we are in a bit of a conundrum. While we all benefit from and make good use of collective resources, we at the same time are suspicious of the theory behind which they operate. Thus while on the one hand we deride the idea of universal healthcare as “socialized medicine,” we do not question the merit of public K-12 education, which, let’s be honest, is really “socialized education.” It’s certainly quite an interesting, confusing, and complicated public debate.

That being said, I thought it could be worthwhile to investigate some uniquely American examples of collective ownership at work. The examples that follow include successful businesses, cooperative housing, sports teams, and even a prime example right here in Burlington. While the examples are wide-ranging, they follow a few basic principles: namely, they are locally-owned, and they are run cooperatively, with members having both a say in the decision making process, and a stake in their success or failure.
So here goes:

Recreational Equipment Incorporated

This Seattle-based company is the largest consumer cooperative in the United States. Like other consumer cooperatives (such as City Market), members receive an annual check of 10% of what they spend per year at R.E.I., which can be used as credit or collected as cash. Other perks include discounts on rental equipment, member-only special deals, exclusive coupons, and more. The incentive for membership is clear, and the reward for the business is readily apparent; when a business, at least in part, belongs to you, you are that much more likely to spend your money there.

Co-Op City

In the northeast corner of NYC, in the Bronx, you can find Co-Op City, the single largest housing development in the United States. Made up of 15,372 residential units in 35 high rise buildings, this city-within-a-city boasts multiple schools, shopping centers, a power plant, daycare centers, parks, a movie theater, two newspapers, and just about anything else one could need. Co-Op City is run by a board elected by tenants of the complex. Moreover, it is a uniquely diverse community. Like any other housing cooperative, it’s tenants own shares in the overall cooperative, and thus have more legal power over their apartments than tenants in a traditional owner/tenant situation. In an age in which renting is becoming more and more the norm, the cooperative alternative may be an appealing choice for many people.

The Green Bay Packers

As the NFL’s only self-funded team, they are owned exclusively by their fans.  One of the greatest argument for collective ownership of a sports team, besides the obvious pride the fans have in owning a small fraction of the franchise, is the fact that when funding is required, say, for stadium improvements, that money is given voluntarily. When other teams need a stadium upgrade, it’s taxpayers that usually foot the bill, whether they’re fans or not.

City Market

Over a decade ago, Burlington was in the position of looking for a new grocery store to serve the downtown area. While many folks wanted a chain grocery such as Shaw’s or Hannaford, others called for a more unique vision. eventually won out, of course. The Market differs from its’ corporate counter-parts in a few ways: firstly, it offers a wealth of locally-produced food, which supports Vermont’s farming communities. Second, it is a community-owned store, with over 7,000 members owning a share of the profits. As a member, you receive discounts on store purchases, but volunteering at the Co-Op guarantees even better discounts: 7% for two hours worked a month, and $12 for four. Once a year, a share of the profits are given back to you, depending on how much money you spent and how profitable the Market was. Decisions are decided by a board that is made up of community members. Every aspect of the market is community-owned. What could be more important than to have control over your community’s source of food?
Co-ops and other forms of community ownership are not without their flaws. Since board members are elected, decisions can occasionally be hard to reach, as is the case in any democratically-run institution. However, with more of a vested interest in a community, co-ops usually have the well-being of that community as a priority. Moreover, they suffer less from the heavy-handed top-down structure of traditional businesses and institutions, and capital is more equitably distributed. In an age in which CEOs and others at the top of companies regularly receive compensation many, many hundreds of times percent higher than employees lower on the totem poll, it’s easy to see why a more cooperative approach is appealing. There is also something appealing in the concept of local ownership—in the case of City Market, for example, the powers that be are members of our own community, and not strangers sitting in offices out of state or even out of country.

So collective ownership, as an economic concept, isn’t as foreign as many today might make it out to be. Besides libraries and public education, as mentioned above, other institutions that fall under the umbrella of services we collectively pay for, vote on, and share the benefits of include parks, roads and transportation infrastructure, energy utilities, hospitals, police forces, firemen, and the military. It is possible, I believe, for a company, a sports team, a housing development, and a grocery store to both make money, share earnings in a more collective manner, reach decisions democratically (we certainly abide that principle when it comes to government—so why are we so quick to bemoan it when it comes to economics?), and operate with the interest of the community they serve as a priority. In an age in which terms like “socialism” are used by our politicians with such negativity, they would perhaps do well to open their eyes to the myriad ways we actually make use of both local and national collective ownership in this country.

These days, it's nearly impossible to turn on the news without hearing a politician warning us darkly about a “socialist agenda” taking root in Washington. A historically loaded and negative term to the ears of most citizens, the fervor with which it has been slung in recent times recalls a ghost of the Red Scare. In reality, America, like any other country, benefits from many institutions that operate under the principles of collective, and often local, ownership. Take the public library, for example, which is a distinctly American invention of which few towns are without. So we are in a bit of a conundrum. While we all benefit from and make good use of collective resources, we at the same time are suspicious of the theory behind which they operate. Thus while on the one hand we deride the idea of universal healthcare as “socialized medicine,” we do not question the merit of public K-12 education, which, let's be honest, is really “socialized education.” It's certainly quite an interesting, confusing, and complicated public debate. That being said, I thought it could be worthwhile to investigate some uniquely American examples of collective ownership at work. The examples that follow include successful businesses, cooperative housing, sports teams, and even a prime example right here in Burlington. While the examples are wide-ranging, they follow a few basic principles: namely, they are locally-owned, and they are run cooperatively, with members having both a say in the decision making process, and a stake in their success or failure. So here goes: Recreational Equipment Incorporated This Seattle-based company is the largest consumer cooperative in the United States. Like other consumer cooperatives (such as City Market), members receive an annual check of 10% of what they spend per year at R.E.I., which can be used as credit or collected as cash. Other perks include discounts on rental equipment, member-only special deals, exclusive coupons, and more. The incentive for membership is clear, and the reward for the business is readily apparent; when a business, at least in part, belongs to you, you are that much more likely to spend your money there. Co-Op City In the northeast corner of NYC, in the Bronx, you can find Co-Op City, the single largest housing development in the United States. Made up of 15,372 residential units in 35 high rise buildings, this city-within-a-city boasts multiple schools, shopping centers, a power plant, daycare centers, parks, a movie theater, two newspapers, and just about anything else one could need. Co-Op City is run by a board elected by tenants of the complex. Moreover, it is a uniquely diverse community. Like any other housing cooperative, it's tenants own shares in the overall cooperative, and thus have more legal power over their apartments than tenants in a traditional owner/tenant situation. In an age in which renting is becoming more and more the norm, the cooperative alternative may be an appealing choice for many people. The Green Bay Packers As the NFL's only self-funded team, they are owned exclusively by their fans.  One of the greatest argument for collective ownership of a sports team, besides the obvious pride the fans have in owning a small fraction of the franchise, is the fact that when funding is required, say, for stadium improvements, that money is given voluntarily. When other teams need a stadium upgrade, it's taxpayers that usually foot the bill, whether they're fans or not. City Market Over a decade ago, Burlington was in the position of looking for a new grocery store to serve the downtown area. While many folks wanted a chain grocery such as Shaw's or Hannaford, others called for a more unique vision. eventually won out, of course. The Market differs from its' corporate counter-parts in a few ways: firstly, it offers a wealth of locally-produced food, which supports Vermont's farming communities. Second, it is a community-owned store, with over 7,000 members owning a share of the profits. As a member, you receive discounts on store purchases, but volunteering at the Co-Op guarantees even better discounts: 7% for two hours worked a month, and $12 for four. Once a year, a share of the profits are given back to you, depending on how much money you spent and how profitable the Market was. Decisions are decided by a board that is made up of community members. Every aspect of the market is community-owned. What could be more important than to have control over your community's source of food? Co-ops and other forms of community ownership are not without their flaws. Since board members are elected, decisions can occasionally be hard to reach, as is the case in any democratically-run institution. However, with more of a vested interest in a community, co-ops usually have the well-being of that community as a priority. Moreover, they suffer less from the heavy-handed top-down structure of traditional businesses and institutions, and capital is more equitably distributed. In an age in which CEOs and others at the top of companies regularly receive compensation many, many hundreds of times percent higher than employees lower on the totem poll, it's easy to see why a more cooperative approach is appealing. There is also something appealing in the concept of local ownership—in the case of City Market, for example, the powers that be are members of our own community, and not strangers sitting in offices out of state or even out of country. So collective ownership, as an economic concept, isn't as foreign as many today might make it out to be. Besides libraries and public education, as mentioned above, other institutions that fall under the umbrella of services we collectively pay for, vote on, and share the benefits of include parks, roads and transportation infrastructure, energy utilities, hospitals, police forces, firemen, and the military. It is possible, I believe, for a company, a sports team, a housing development, and a grocery store to both make money, share earnings in a more collective manner, reach decisions democratically (we certainly abide that principle when it comes to government—so why are we so quick to bemoan it when it comes to economics?), and operate with the interest of the community they serve as a priority. In an age in which terms like “socialism” are used by our politicians with such negativity, they would perhaps do well to open their eyes to the myriad ways we actually make use of both local and national collective ownership in this country.]]>
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Local Frame of Mind https://www.localvoretoday.com/2011/12/11/local-frame-of-mind/ https://www.localvoretoday.com/2011/12/11/local-frame-of-mind/#comments Sun, 11 Dec 2011 19:57:25 +0000 http://www.localvoretoday.com/welcome/?p=109 Dostie Bros. Frame Shop. Located in the heart of Burlington's South End Arts District, my first impression of the shop, with its stone walls, exposed wood beams, floor-to-ceiling frames, and local artwork, was that it successfully combined a rustic, authentic feel with a commitment to the art community that it served. Behind a glass window I could see the workshop where the framing was actually done. And the fact that customers were invited to sit at a table rather than haggle it out over a cash register seemed to speak to the brothers' particular business philosophy. I've known Alex for a few years now. A prominent figure in the Burlington arts community, I've seen his work time and again, worked with him in my years at The Shelburne Art Center, and have shown my own art courtesy Art's Alive, a non-profit for which he sits on the board. Alex wasn't available, however, but I was more than happy to sit down with Jeremy to get his take on their burgeoning business. So to start, what made you want to open a frame shop? My brother Alex had been working for another frame shop in the Burlington area for about ten years and in that time learned all the ins and outs of the business. Eventually, he wanted to move beyond being an employee for someone else and was confident that he could open up and run his own shop. For me, I'd worked as a flood-map analyst since graduating college, but work started drying up a few years ago. I decided it was time to shift careers. The timing and opportunity just made a lot of sense. So why Burlington? We both grew up near here and we have a lot of connections. When you're opening a business, connections can be crucial to success. Besides owning one yourself, why do you think it is important to support local businesses? I believe it's important to keep money here in our economy, and I don't like watching money go out of state or out of country in support of a chain store. Local businesses also tend to support one another. We all want to see each other succeed. That's a big part of why we love being on Pine Street. Many of the businesses are locally owned, and for the most part strongly supportive of one another. What sets you apart as a frame shop? Our ties to the arts community are pretty strong, and besides making frames, we also operate as a gallery. Right now we're showing works by Vermont artists including Adrian Tans, Kristen L'Esperance, Brooke Monte, and Sage Tucker-Ketcham. In terms of framing, what truly sets us apart is that we custom mill many frames of our own design as well as frames milled by other Burlington artisans, something you don't find very often. And those we don't make ourselves are either American made, or produced in Canada, France or Italy. We're definitely headed in a green direction, in that we use a lot of recycled goods to create our frames. Having wood from ReSource across the street available to us is pretty perfect. Alex and I also like to peruse garage sales where we'll find old vintage frames and fix them up. Artists in particular like that because we can offer one-of-a-kind frames at a very reasonable price. So that's our niche: custom frames made from green or recycled materials, eco-friendly North American and European made lines. You won't find frames made in China in our shop for much longer, we are trying to cull those from our selection as much as possible. What made you want to get involved with LocalvoreToday.com? We were familiar with the daily deal business model and wanted to try it out for our own business. We offered a deal through JumpOnIt, and had a profitable experience. But once we were introduced to LocalvoreToday.com, we much preferred the idea of working with another local business that itself had a commitment to supporting a local economy. It's keeping in line with our ethos as a local, green business.]]> If I am going to be blogging about a local economy I thought it was high time to get out and talk one-on-one with a business owner. With that in mind, I found myself sitting down with Jeremy Dostie, co-owner of the Dostie Bros. Frame Shop.

Located in the heart of Burlington’s South End Arts District, my first impression of the shop, with its stone walls, exposed wood beams, floor-to-ceiling frames, and local artwork, was that it successfully combined a rustic, authentic feel with a commitment to the art community that it served. Behind a glass window I could see the workshop where the framing was actually done. And the fact that customers were invited to sit at a table rather than haggle it out over a cash register seemed to speak to the brothers’ particular business philosophy.

I’ve known Alex for a few years now. A prominent figure in the Burlington arts community, I’ve seen his work time and again, worked with him in my years at The Shelburne Art Center, and have shown my own art courtesy Art’s Alive, a non-profit for which he sits on the board. Alex wasn’t available, however, but I was more than happy to sit down with Jeremy to get his take on their burgeoning business.

So to start, what made you want to open a frame shop?

My brother Alex had been working for another frame shop in the Burlington area for about ten years and in that time learned all the ins and outs of the business. Eventually, he wanted to move beyond being an employee for someone else and was confident that he could open up and run his own shop.

For me, I’d worked as a flood-map analyst since graduating college, but work started drying up a few years ago. I decided it was time to shift careers. The timing and opportunity just made a lot of sense.

So why Burlington?

We both grew up near here and we have a lot of connections. When you’re opening a business, connections can be crucial to success.

Besides owning one yourself, why do you think it is important to support local businesses?

I believe it’s important to keep money here in our economy, and I don’t like watching money go out of state or out of country in support of a chain store. Local businesses also tend to support one another. We all want to see each other succeed. That’s a big part of why we love being on Pine Street. Many of the businesses are locally owned, and for the most part strongly supportive of one another.

What sets you apart as a frame shop?

Our ties to the arts community are pretty strong, and besides making frames, we also operate as a gallery. Right now we’re showing works by Vermont artists including Adrian Tans, Kristen L’Esperance, Brooke Monte, and Sage Tucker-Ketcham.

In terms of framing, what truly sets us apart is that we custom mill many frames of our own design as well as frames milled by other Burlington artisans, something you don’t find very often. And those we don’t make ourselves are either American made, or produced in Canada, France or Italy.

We’re definitely headed in a green direction, in that we use a lot of recycled goods to create our frames. Having wood from ReSource across the street available to us is pretty perfect. Alex and I also like to peruse garage sales where we’ll find old vintage frames and fix them up. Artists in particular like that because we can offer one-of-a-kind frames at a very reasonable price.

So that’s our niche: custom frames made from green or recycled materials, eco-friendly North American and European made lines. You won’t find frames made in China in our shop for much longer, we are trying to cull those from our selection as much as possible.

What made you want to get involved with LocalvoreToday.com?

We were familiar with the daily deal business model and wanted to try it out for our own business. We offered a deal through JumpOnIt, and had a profitable experience. But once we were introduced to LocalvoreToday.com, we much preferred the idea of working with another local business that itself had a commitment to supporting a local economy. It’s keeping in line with our ethos as a local, green business.

If I am going to be blogging about a local economy I thought it was high time to get out and talk one-on-one with a business owner. With that in mind, I found myself sitting down with Jeremy Dostie, co-owner of the Dostie Bros. Frame Shop. Located in the heart of Burlington's South End Arts District, my first impression of the shop, with its stone walls, exposed wood beams, floor-to-ceiling frames, and local artwork, was that it successfully combined a rustic, authentic feel with a commitment to the art community that it served. Behind a glass window I could see the workshop where the framing was actually done. And the fact that customers were invited to sit at a table rather than haggle it out over a cash register seemed to speak to the brothers' particular business philosophy. I've known Alex for a few years now. A prominent figure in the Burlington arts community, I've seen his work time and again, worked with him in my years at The Shelburne Art Center, and have shown my own art courtesy Art's Alive, a non-profit for which he sits on the board. Alex wasn't available, however, but I was more than happy to sit down with Jeremy to get his take on their burgeoning business. So to start, what made you want to open a frame shop? My brother Alex had been working for another frame shop in the Burlington area for about ten years and in that time learned all the ins and outs of the business. Eventually, he wanted to move beyond being an employee for someone else and was confident that he could open up and run his own shop. For me, I'd worked as a flood-map analyst since graduating college, but work started drying up a few years ago. I decided it was time to shift careers. The timing and opportunity just made a lot of sense. So why Burlington? We both grew up near here and we have a lot of connections. When you're opening a business, connections can be crucial to success. Besides owning one yourself, why do you think it is important to support local businesses? I believe it's important to keep money here in our economy, and I don't like watching money go out of state or out of country in support of a chain store. Local businesses also tend to support one another. We all want to see each other succeed. That's a big part of why we love being on Pine Street. Many of the businesses are locally owned, and for the most part strongly supportive of one another. What sets you apart as a frame shop? Our ties to the arts community are pretty strong, and besides making frames, we also operate as a gallery. Right now we're showing works by Vermont artists including Adrian Tans, Kristen L'Esperance, Brooke Monte, and Sage Tucker-Ketcham. In terms of framing, what truly sets us apart is that we custom mill many frames of our own design as well as frames milled by other Burlington artisans, something you don't find very often. And those we don't make ourselves are either American made, or produced in Canada, France or Italy. We're definitely headed in a green direction, in that we use a lot of recycled goods to create our frames. Having wood from ReSource across the street available to us is pretty perfect. Alex and I also like to peruse garage sales where we'll find old vintage frames and fix them up. Artists in particular like that because we can offer one-of-a-kind frames at a very reasonable price. So that's our niche: custom frames made from green or recycled materials, eco-friendly North American and European made lines. You won't find frames made in China in our shop for much longer, we are trying to cull those from our selection as much as possible. What made you want to get involved with LocalvoreToday.com? We were familiar with the daily deal business model and wanted to try it out for our own business. We offered a deal through JumpOnIt, and had a profitable experience. But once we were introduced to LocalvoreToday.com, we much preferred the idea of working with another local business that itself had a commitment to supporting a local economy. It's keeping in line with our ethos as a local, green business.]]>
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Why Localvore? https://www.localvoretoday.com/2011/10/27/why-localvore/ https://www.localvoretoday.com/2011/10/27/why-localvore/#comments Thu, 27 Oct 2011 15:48:38 +0000 http://www.localvoretoday.com/welcome/?p=74 localvore? There are certainly a lot of interpretations. On one end of the spectrum, you have folks who, when given the choice, use their purchasing power to buy food grown and produced by local farmers over the stuff the comes from national or even international suppliers. At the more extreme end of things, you have people who test their pallets and their willpower by taking the localvore challenge, and forgoing all food that is produced outside of a 100-mile radius. Some people undergo this challenge for a week; others press on through the whole winter. You can learn more about this at http://www.vermontlocalvore.org/challenge/ While traditionally the term localvore pertains to food, I'd like to expand the definition beyond just what we eat. To me, being a localvore can encompass all things we consume, from clothing to furniture to artwork. It can mean choosing to shop at locally-owned businesses over national or international chains, and in the process making a concerted effort to keep your money in-state and support your local economy. Well, why should that matter? There are many reasons to be a local consumer. In subsequent blog posts I'll explore them all, from the environmental, the economic, the social, the political, and even the aesthetic reasons buying local can be a good idea. Today I'd like to explore some of the basic ideas behind localvorism through the perspective of a coffee shop patron. In Burlington, there are many coffee shops. Off the top of my mind, I can think of about five I frequent regularly within a six block radius of each other, all of them locally owned and operated, and each with their own unique look, vibe, and specialties. And then there's one other downtown shop that is a national chain. I'm jonesing for a cup of coffee. I head into the national chain coffee shop. Their coffee is great, their baristas are friendly, the place is clean, and they have free wi-fi. So far, though, these guys don't really have a leg up on the local competition. After all, you can get a great cup of coffee at all of the shops locally from friendly baristas in relatively clean environments, and usually with free wi-fi. Perhaps the only difference is that our national chain has issued uniforms and dress codes for their staff, and mandates that, for example, tattoos must be hidden. So style-wise, they've actually lost a few points to the more expressive-looking staff at every other shop around town. But baristas in hipster chic is really no reason to become a localvore, so let's move on. What if you're thinking about getting a pastry with your coffee? The ones at the national chain certainly look good, and I'm sure they're delicious. But the difference here between the national chain and local should be obvious: at your local coffee shops, you're likely to find at least a portion of the baked goods—and sometimes all of them—coming fresh from the oven of local bakers. And these local bakers likely used at least some ingredients produced at local farms. Maybe they used fruits grown by Charlotte Berry Farm out in Charlotte, Vermont, or used flour from King Arthur Flour in Norwich. Either way, a whole lot of Vermonters had a hand in stocking that coffee shop full of pastries and desserts, something that can't be said for our corporate coffee shop. So already by choosing to purchase a muffin at your local shop, chances are you're helping to keep Vermonters in business. And what about the general aesthetic of the place? While our local coffee shops often rotate artwork by local artists, play diverse music, and host local musicians and poets, our national chain does no such thing. For them, every bit of aesthetic in their shop, from the color scheme, to the artwork, to the dress of their employees, have been designed with a brand in mind. That's not a judgment—and in fact, it can be quite an appealing brand. It's even rumored that in every one of these national coffee shops in locations across the country, the same music is being played at the same time throughout them all. The point here is that this shop has been designed by a team of folks far, far away. Their tested brand is designed to appeal to the maximum—but it is identical regardless of where you go in the world. To me, there's something special about the unique design, aesthetic, and creativity that locals have poured into their businesses. Can you find a funkier vibe downtown than at The Radiobean? How can you beat the earthy Shire-like quality of Muddy Waters? You can't get a quicker cup of coffee downtown than at the streamlined Uncommon Grounds, and I, for one, love the regularly rotated artwork at Speeder & Earl's (both Church Street and Pine Street locations). But what if the look and feel of a place doesn't really speak to you, and you're more concerned with the pure economics of a national chain vs. a local business? If you dig even deeper, consider that while it is true our corporate chain employs Vermont baristas and managers in their shop, everyone who has a hand in running the company—from its executives to its public relations teams to its creative professionals—are employed out-of-state. And this phenomena is all the more true when you look at any other example of a national chain vs. a local business. Local businesses, by their very nature, have a vested interest in their community. They are dependent on the support of local consumers and employ locals in many or all aspects of their operation. Beyond this, if our national chain decided it would be more profitable to move elsewhere, they can leave a town high and dry without coffee. Which, granted, is perhaps not the most important consumer good. But what if instead we're talking about a national grocery store closing? Like a factory town dying off when a plant closes, for some towns that become reliant on national chains for goods and jobs (albeit often minimum wage), the loss of a store, which with ease can close up shop and move elsewhere, often has a huge impact on a community. Therefore supporting local business means looking at the long view in terms of the economic health of a community. It means supporting local jobs, many of which are the ones behind-the-scenes. It means going for a local aesthetic over a corporate brand. It means making a conscious effort to keep money and good-paying jobs in state. In that sense, every cup of coffee helps.  ]]> What does it mean to be a localvore? There are certainly a lot of interpretations. On one end of the spectrum, you have folks who, when given the choice, use their purchasing power to buy food grown and produced by local farmers over the stuff the comes from national or even international suppliers. At the more extreme end of things, you have people who test their pallets and their willpower by taking the localvore challenge, and forgoing all food that is produced outside of a 100-mile radius. Some people undergo this challenge for a week; others press on through the whole winter. You can learn more about this at http://www.vermontlocalvore.org/challenge/

While traditionally the term localvore pertains to food, I’d like to expand the definition beyond just what we eat. To me, being a localvore can encompass all things we consume, from clothing to furniture to artwork. It can mean choosing to shop at locally-owned businesses over national or international chains, and in the process making a concerted effort to keep your money in-state and support your local economy.

Well, why should that matter?

There are many reasons to be a local consumer. In subsequent blog posts I’ll explore them all, from the environmental, the economic, the social, the political, and even the aesthetic reasons buying local can be a good idea. Today I’d like to explore some of the basic ideas behind localvorism through the perspective of a coffee shop patron.

In Burlington, there are many coffee shops. Off the top of my mind, I can think of about five I frequent regularly within a six block radius of each other, all of them locally owned and operated, and each with their own unique look, vibe, and specialties. And then there’s one other downtown shop that is a national chain.

I’m jonesing for a cup of coffee. I head into the national chain coffee shop. Their coffee is great, their baristas are friendly, the place is clean, and they have free wi-fi.

So far, though, these guys don’t really have a leg up on the local competition. After all, you can get a great cup of coffee at all of the shops locally from friendly baristas in relatively clean environments, and usually with free wi-fi. Perhaps the only difference is that our national chain has issued uniforms and dress codes for their staff, and mandates that, for example, tattoos must be hidden. So style-wise, they’ve actually lost a few points to the more expressive-looking staff at every other shop around town. But baristas in hipster chic is really no reason to become a localvore, so let’s move on.

What if you’re thinking about getting a pastry with your coffee? The ones at the national chain certainly look good, and I’m sure they’re delicious. But the difference here between the national chain and local should be obvious: at your local coffee shops, you’re likely to find at least a portion of the baked goods—and sometimes all of them—coming fresh from the oven of local bakers. And these local bakers likely used at least some ingredients produced at local farms. Maybe they used fruits grown by Charlotte Berry Farm out in Charlotte, Vermont, or used flour from King Arthur Flour in Norwich. Either way, a whole lot of Vermonters had a hand in stocking that coffee shop full of pastries and desserts, something that can’t be said for our corporate coffee shop. So already by choosing to purchase a muffin at your local shop, chances are you’re helping to keep Vermonters in business.

And what about the general aesthetic of the place? While our local coffee shops often rotate artwork by local artists, play diverse music, and host local musicians and poets, our national chain does no such thing. For them, every bit of aesthetic in their shop, from the color scheme, to the artwork, to the dress of their employees, have been designed with a brand in mind. That’s not a judgment—and in fact, it can be quite an appealing brand. It’s even rumored that in every one of these national coffee shops in locations across the country, the same music is being played at the same time throughout them all.

The point here is that this shop has been designed by a team of folks far, far away. Their tested brand is designed to appeal to the maximum—but it is identical regardless of where you go in the world. To me, there’s something special about the unique design, aesthetic, and creativity that locals have poured into their businesses. Can you find a funkier vibe downtown than at The Radiobean? How can you beat the earthy Shire-like quality of Muddy Waters? You can’t get a quicker cup of coffee downtown than at the streamlined Uncommon Grounds, and I, for one, love the regularly rotated artwork at Speeder & Earl’s (both Church Street and Pine Street locations).

But what if the look and feel of a place doesn’t really speak to you, and you’re more concerned with the pure economics of a national chain vs. a local business? If you dig even deeper, consider that while it is true our corporate chain employs Vermont baristas and managers in their shop, everyone who has a hand in running the company—from its executives to its public relations teams to its creative professionals—are employed out-of-state. And this phenomena is all the more true when you look at any other example of a national chain vs. a local business. Local businesses, by their very nature, have a vested interest in their community. They are dependent on the support of local consumers and employ locals in many or all aspects of their operation.

Beyond this, if our national chain decided it would be more profitable to move elsewhere, they can leave a town high and dry without coffee. Which, granted, is perhaps not the most important consumer good. But what if instead we’re talking about a national grocery store closing? Like a factory town dying off when a plant closes, for some towns that become reliant on national chains for goods and jobs (albeit often minimum wage), the loss of a store, which with ease can close up shop and move elsewhere, often has a huge impact on a community.

Therefore supporting local business means looking at the long view in terms of the economic health of a community. It means supporting local jobs, many of which are the ones behind-the-scenes. It means going for a local aesthetic over a corporate brand. It means making a conscious effort to keep money and good-paying jobs in state. In that sense, every cup of coffee helps.

 

What does it mean to be a localvore? There are certainly a lot of interpretations. On one end of the spectrum, you have folks who, when given the choice, use their purchasing power to buy food grown and produced by local farmers over the stuff the comes from national or even international suppliers. At the more extreme end of things, you have people who test their pallets and their willpower by taking the localvore challenge, and forgoing all food that is produced outside of a 100-mile radius. Some people undergo this challenge for a week; others press on through the whole winter. You can learn more about this at http://www.vermontlocalvore.org/challenge/ While traditionally the term localvore pertains to food, I'd like to expand the definition beyond just what we eat. To me, being a localvore can encompass all things we consume, from clothing to furniture to artwork. It can mean choosing to shop at locally-owned businesses over national or international chains, and in the process making a concerted effort to keep your money in-state and support your local economy. Well, why should that matter? There are many reasons to be a local consumer. In subsequent blog posts I'll explore them all, from the environmental, the economic, the social, the political, and even the aesthetic reasons buying local can be a good idea. Today I'd like to explore some of the basic ideas behind localvorism through the perspective of a coffee shop patron. In Burlington, there are many coffee shops. Off the top of my mind, I can think of about five I frequent regularly within a six block radius of each other, all of them locally owned and operated, and each with their own unique look, vibe, and specialties. And then there's one other downtown shop that is a national chain. I'm jonesing for a cup of coffee. I head into the national chain coffee shop. Their coffee is great, their baristas are friendly, the place is clean, and they have free wi-fi. So far, though, these guys don't really have a leg up on the local competition. After all, you can get a great cup of coffee at all of the shops locally from friendly baristas in relatively clean environments, and usually with free wi-fi. Perhaps the only difference is that our national chain has issued uniforms and dress codes for their staff, and mandates that, for example, tattoos must be hidden. So style-wise, they've actually lost a few points to the more expressive-looking staff at every other shop around town. But baristas in hipster chic is really no reason to become a localvore, so let's move on. What if you're thinking about getting a pastry with your coffee? The ones at the national chain certainly look good, and I'm sure they're delicious. But the difference here between the national chain and local should be obvious: at your local coffee shops, you're likely to find at least a portion of the baked goods—and sometimes all of them—coming fresh from the oven of local bakers. And these local bakers likely used at least some ingredients produced at local farms. Maybe they used fruits grown by Charlotte Berry Farm out in Charlotte, Vermont, or used flour from King Arthur Flour in Norwich. Either way, a whole lot of Vermonters had a hand in stocking that coffee shop full of pastries and desserts, something that can't be said for our corporate coffee shop. So already by choosing to purchase a muffin at your local shop, chances are you're helping to keep Vermonters in business. And what about the general aesthetic of the place? While our local coffee shops often rotate artwork by local artists, play diverse music, and host local musicians and poets, our national chain does no such thing. For them, every bit of aesthetic in their shop, from the color scheme, to the artwork, to the dress of their employees, have been designed with a brand in mind. That's not a judgment—and in fact, it can be quite an appealing brand. It's even rumored that in every one of these national coffee shops in locations across the country, the same music is being played at the same time throughout them all. The point here is that this shop has been designed by a team of folks far, far away. Their tested brand is designed to appeal to the maximum—but it is identical regardless of where you go in the world. To me, there's something special about the unique design, aesthetic, and creativity that locals have poured into their businesses. Can you find a funkier vibe downtown than at The Radiobean? How can you beat the earthy Shire-like quality of Muddy Waters? You can't get a quicker cup of coffee downtown than at the streamlined Uncommon Grounds, and I, for one, love the regularly rotated artwork at Speeder & Earl's (both Church Street and Pine Street locations). But what if the look and feel of a place doesn't really speak to you, and you're more concerned with the pure economics of a national chain vs. a local business? If you dig even deeper, consider that while it is true our corporate chain employs Vermont baristas and managers in their shop, everyone who has a hand in running the company—from its executives to its public relations teams to its creative professionals—are employed out-of-state. And this phenomena is all the more true when you look at any other example of a national chain vs. a local business. Local businesses, by their very nature, have a vested interest in their community. They are dependent on the support of local consumers and employ locals in many or all aspects of their operation. Beyond this, if our national chain decided it would be more profitable to move elsewhere, they can leave a town high and dry without coffee. Which, granted, is perhaps not the most important consumer good. But what if instead we're talking about a national grocery store closing? Like a factory town dying off when a plant closes, for some towns that become reliant on national chains for goods and jobs (albeit often minimum wage), the loss of a store, which with ease can close up shop and move elsewhere, often has a huge impact on a community. Therefore supporting local business means looking at the long view in terms of the economic health of a community. It means supporting local jobs, many of which are the ones behind-the-scenes. It means going for a local aesthetic over a corporate brand. It means making a conscious effort to keep money and good-paying jobs in state. In that sense, every cup of coffee helps.  ]]>
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